Remedy

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Modern drug ampoules are shown. Credit: ignis.

Def. "a medicine, application, or treatment that relieves or cures a disease"[1] is called a remedy.

Cures[edit | edit source]

Def. a "method, device or medication that restores good health"[2] or an act "of healing or state of being healed; restoration to health after a disease, or to soundness after injury"[3] is called a cure.

Medicines[edit | edit source]

Def. a "substance which specifically promotes healing [when][4] ingested or consumed in some way"[5], a "treatment or cure"[4], or the "study of the cause, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease or illness"[4] is called a medicine or medicine.

Nutraceuticals[edit | edit source]

Chia Salvia hispanica is grown commercially for its seeds rich in α-linolenic acid. Credit: Daniel Schwen.

Def. a "nutrient or food believed to have curative properties"[6] or a "food used as a drug"[6] is called a nutraceutical.

A nutraceutical or 'bioceutical' is a pharmaceutical alternative which claims physiological benefits.[7][8]

In the US, "nutraceuticals" are largely unregulated, as they exist in the same category as dietary supplements and food additives by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.[9][10]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Deekayen (19 April 2005). "remedy". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2013-06-17. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  2. Citizen Premier~enwiktionary (6 October 2005). "cure". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 17 July 2021. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  3. Equinox (12 October 2013). "cure". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 17 July 2021. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Littenberg (10 February 2007). "medicine". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 26 June 2021. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  5. Merphant (16 January 2003). "medicine". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 26 June 2021. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  6. 6.0 6.1 Dvortygirl (23 March 2005). "nutraceutical". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 26 June 2021. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  7. Sarris, Jerome; Murphy, Jenifer; Mischoulon, David; Papakostas, George I.; Fava, Maurizio; Berk, Michael; Ng, Chee H. (2016). "Adjunctive Nutraceuticals for Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses". American Journal of Psychiatry 173 (6): 575–587. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.2016.15091228. PMID 27113121. 
  8. Banach, Maciej; Patti, Angelo Maria; Giglio, Rosaria Vincenza; Cicero, Arrigo F.G.; Atanasov, Atanas G.; Bajraktari, Gani; Bruckert, Eric; Descamps, Olivier et al. (2018). "The Role of Nutraceuticals in Statin Intolerant Patients". Journal of the American College of Cardiology 72 (1): 96–118. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.040. PMID 29957236. 
  9. "Supplement Makers Touting Cures for Alzheimer's and Other Diseases Get F.D.A. Warning". The New York Times. 11 February 2019. Retrieved 2019-05-11.
  10. "Labeling & Nutrition". The Food and Drug Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services. 5 October 2016. Retrieved 2016-10-11.

External links[edit | edit source]