Enzymology

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Hexokinase is displayed as an opaque surface with a pronounced open binding cleft next to an unbound substrate (top) and the same enzyme with more closed cleft that surrounds the bound substrate (bottom). Credit: Thomas Shafee.

Enzymology is the study of enzymes, their kinetics, structure, and function, as well as their relation to each other.

In the diagram on the right, hexokinase is displayed as an opaque surface with a pronounced open binding cleft next to an unbound substrate (top) and the same enzyme with more closed cleft that surrounds the bound substrate (bottom). The enzyme changes shape by induced fit upon substrate binding to form an enzyme-substrate complex. Hexokinase has a large induced fit motion that closes over the substrates adenosine triphosphate and xylose. Binding sites in blue, substrates in black and Mg2+ cofactor in yellow.

Biochemistry[edit]

A classification of enzymes includes

  1. hydrolases,
  1. carbohydrases,
  2. nucleases,
  3. amidases,
  4. purine deaminases,
  5. peptidases,
  6. proteinases,
  7. esterases,
  8. iron enzymes,
  9. copper enzymes,
  10. enzymes containing co-enzymes 1 and/or 2,
  11. yellow enzymes

2. hydrases,

3. mutases,

4. desmolases,

5. other enzymes, and

6. polysaccharide-synthesizing enzymes.

Enzymes[edit]

Def. a "globular protein that catalyses a biological chemical reaction"[1] is called an enzyme.

Theoretical enzymology[edit]

Def. a science "that studies enzymes"[2] is called enzymology.

Entities[edit]

The image shows Aleksandr Oparin (right) and Andrei Kursanov at the enzymology laboratory in 1938. Credit: Pavel Troshkin.

Electromagnetics[edit]

A "new enzymology develops around the organic liquids more favorable in the THz frequencies. ... The design of such microfluidic hioMEMS should answer to a good microfluidic and electromagnetic propagation, and should have an antiseptic character."[3]

Hypotheses[edit]

Main source: Hypotheses
  1. Enzymology through varied gene expression may hold the key to reversing deleterious gene expression.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. "enzyme, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 7 June 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-15. 
  2. "enzymology, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 20 June 2013. Retrieved 2014-08-15. 
  3. V Mille, NE Bourzgui, F Mejdjoub, L. Desplanque, J.F. Lampin, P. Supiot, and B. Bocquet (2004). Technological development of THz microfluidic microsystems for biological spectroscopy, In: Infrared and Millimeter Waves. IEEE. pp. 549-50. doi:10.1109/ICIMW.2004.1422207. ISBN 0-7803-8490-3. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=1422207&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D1422207. Retrieved 2015-11-04. 

External links[edit]

{{Medicine resources}}{{Phosphate biochemistry}}

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