Dominant group/Sociology/Term test

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The two-word term dominant group occurs in about 280 articles on Wikipedia and several times on other WMF projects. Those that appear to be part of sociology are included here. Some of the sentences containing dominant group in these articles may not be attributed (cited or referenced to a source). What would you do?

Below in the sections, including "Dominant group on wikipedia", is a partial list.

Some of these occurrences have a right or wrong answer, but many may be open to debate.

Read through each of the following learning guides, then take the test.

Some of the answers are listed on the 'Discuss' page for this learning resource. Others are awaiting your answers.

Be bold.

Enjoy learning by doing!

Original research[edit]

Some hints about original research can be found in original research inquiry or original research.

For evaluating the occurrences of dominant group, here is the associated 'original research' question:

Are any of these uses of dominant group original research or original synthesis?

Attributions[edit]

Hints about attribution can be found in this article, dominant group/attribution and copyright.

Should each sentence using dominant group have a reference or citation after it?

Are any of the uses of dominant group plagiarism?

Copyrights[edit]

Main sources: Laws/Copyrights and Copyrights

Please keep in mind that the copyright policy on Wikipedia (or any of the WMF projects) is in line with WMF desires to allow others to sell educational materials such as books in countries and political regions that may have a much more restrictive copyright law than the USA where the WMF is located.

This is a learning resource for Wikiversity that you may enjoy with respect to publication in the US. Please refrain from making any actual changes to Wikipedia, or any project, unless and until you are sure these changes are in line with local project policy.

Hints about copyright can be found in this article, "dominant group/attribution and copyright".

As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?

What to do[edit]

What would you do if you found each sentence, or for each sentence, on Wikipedia, or any of the WMF projects?

Some hints can be found in this article, dominant group/attribution and copyright.

Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?

Dominant group on wikibooks[edit]

Here is a summary list of the test questions.

  1. Are any of these uses of dominant group original research or original synthesis?
  2. Should each sentence using dominant group have a reference or citation after it?
  3. Are any of the uses of dominant group plagiarism?
  4. As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?
  5. What you would do if you found each sentence (for each sentence) on Wikipedia, or on Wikiversity?
  6. Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?
  7. How would you edit the entry or the current page on Wikipedia or Wikiversity?

Separately, write what you believe about each of these with respect to

  1. original research or synthesis,
  2. attribution,
  3. copyright, and
  4. a step by step procedure of what to do if you (or anyone) finds anything similar on Wikipedia or Wikiversity.

The current page is either within the quote, before the quote, after the quote as a reference, or indicated after the reference to the author who contributed dominant group to the page.

  1. Per Survey of Communication Study/Chapter 12 - Intercultural Communication: "These people are what we refer to as the dominant group: white, male, Christian, middle-class, able-bodied, educated, and heterosexual."
  2. "People whose cultural identities do not conform to this model are the nondominant groups and have less sociopolitical and economic power.", same as above.
  3. "Peggy McIntosh uses the term privilege to refer to the power of dominant groups.", same.
  4. "This ethnocentric bias has received some challenge in United States’ schools as teachers make efforts to create a multicultural classroom by incorporating books, short stories, and traditions from nondominant groups." same book, different section: Survey of Communication Study/Chapter 12 - Intercultural Communication.
  5. "Do they bring up different historical periods, varying degrees of sociopolitical power, a variety of relationships to the dominant group?", per Survey of Communication Study/Chapter 12 - Intercultural Communication.
  6. "When a group reclaims a word they are attempting to take it back from the dominant group.", same as immediately above.
  7. "If the dominant group has used a word or phrase as an insult then the oppressed group reclaims it for their own, positive meaning.", same as immediately above.
  8. From Bilingual Education/Coercive Power and Language: "The civic perspective deals with the expansion of dynasties into new territories, hence, strengthening the boundaries of the states; the ethnic perspective refers to movement in which “leaders of a cultural and linguistic group aimed to provide the group with territory within which they would be the sole and dominant group” (p.46). It is not difficult to assume that in order to be the “sole and dominant group” these leaders would have to override other cultural and linguistic expressions if not by means of violence, then, by legal means, passing laws that could prohibit the practices of other languages."
  9. "The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has less power (whether political or economic) than a dominant group.", from Introduction to Sociology/Race and Ethnicity.
  10. "In this process, the minority group sheds its distinctive traits and is absorbed into the dominant group.", same as immediately above.
  11. Per Gender and ICT/Taking a Closer Look at Women's Realities: "Thus the dominant group in a society determines the shape and direction of a society’s techno-economic order - and the image of an inventor has almost always been male."
  12. From Survey of Communication Study/Chapter 6 - Communication Research: "This research often uncovers assumptions and biases in our language that provide insight into how dominant groups and systems are maintained rhetorically, and how they can be challenged and transformed through rhetoric."
  13. "Women (and members of other subordinate groups) are not as free or as able as men are to say what they wish, when and where they wish, because the words and the norms for their use have been formulated by the dominant group, men.", per Survey of Communication Study/Chapter 13 - Gender Communication.
  14. "Most of the vocabulary of Hawaiian Pidgin is derived from English, the language of the dominant group.", from Cultural Anthropology/Communication and Language.

Dominant group on wikimedia meta-wiki[edit]

Here is a summary list of the test questions.

  1. Are any of these uses of dominant group original research or original synthesis?
  2. Should each sentence using dominant group have a reference or citation after it?
  3. Are any of the uses of dominant group plagiarism?
  4. As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?
  5. What you would do if you found each sentence (for each sentence) on Wikipedia, or on Wikiversity?
  6. Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?
  7. How would you edit the entry or the current page on Wikipedia or Wikiversity?

Separately, write what you believe about each of these with respect to

  1. original research or synthesis,
  2. attribution,
  3. copyright, and
  4. a step by step procedure of what to do if you (or anyone) finds anything similar on Wikipedia or Wikiversity.

The current page is either within the quote, before the quote, after the quote as a reference, or indicated after the reference to the author who contributed dominant group to the page.

  1. "Forms of communication that occur in the dominant group of men between the ages of 15-30 and 40-50 can be deterrent for people of other ages or for women.", from Wikimedia Deutschland/2012 Programme Plan.
  2. "As long as there is one clearly dominant group things are easier, because all you need is warranties for minorities.", per Language committee/Archives/2007-04.

Dominant group on wikipedia[edit]

Here is a summary list of the test questions.

  1. Are any of these uses of dominant group original research or original synthesis?
  2. Should each sentence using dominant group have a reference or citation after it?
  3. Are any of the uses of dominant group plagiarism?
  4. As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?
  5. What you would do if you found each sentence (for each sentence) on Wikipedia, or on Wikiversity?
  6. Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?
  7. How would you edit the entry or the current page on Wikipedia or Wikiversity?

Separately, write what you believe about each of these with respect to

  1. original research or synthesis,
  2. attribution,
  3. copyright, and
  4. a step by step procedure of what to do if you (or anyone) finds anything similar on Wikipedia or Wikiversity.

The current page is either within the quote, before the quote or indicated after the reference to the author who contributed dominant group to the page.

Some hints occur after several of these examples.

  1. "The Establishment is a term used to refer to a visible dominant group or elite that holds power or authority in a nation."[1] Searched over 400 articles on Google scholar out of about 3,800 with keywords such as "dominant group", "the Establishment", "visible", "power", "elite", "authority", and "nation". An association of "the Establishment" and "dominant group" occurs in at least one article.[2]
  2. "A minority group refers a social group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has less power or social status than the dominant group."[3]
  3. "Feagin (1984)[4] states that a minority group has five characteristics: (1) suffering discrimination and subordination, (2) physical and/or cultural traits that set them apart, and which are disapproved by the dominant group, (3) a shared sense of collective identity and common burdens, (4) socially shared rules about who belongs and who does not determine minority status, and (5) tendency to marry within the group."[5]
  4. "The definition of a minority group can vary, depending on specific context, but generally refers to either a sociological sub-group that does not form either a majority or a plurality of the total population, or a group that, while not necessarily a numerical minority, is disadvantaged or otherwise has less power (whether political or economic) than a dominant group."[6]
  5. "The term minority is unavoidably associated with the political movements which push for assimilation, in which the minority group sheds its distinctive traits and is absorbed into the dominant group."[6]
  6. "[T]o aviod confusion, some authors alternately substitute the terms subordinate group and dominant group for the terms "minority group" and majority group, respectively."[7]
  7. "A sociological minority is not necessarily a numerical minority — it may include any group that is subnormal with respect to a dominant group in terms of social status, education, employment, wealth and political power."[8]
  8. "Rather, they are disadvantaged by technologies and social institutions that are designed to cater for the dominant group."[9]
  9. "Vellalar amongst Sri Lankan Tamils are a dominant group of formerly agricultural landlord related caste from Sri Lanka that is found amongst all walks of life and around the world as part of the Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora.[10]" from the article Vellalar of Sri Lanka.
  10. "It refers to the strain in interpretation of feedback between dominant groups and socially stigmatized minority groups. Minority groups find it difficult to interpret the feedback received from dominant groups. According to this concept, members of stigmatized groups find it challenging to determine whether feedback from dominant groups is based upon their actual behavior or membership in a stereotyped stigmatized group. This can cause stigmatized group members to discredit feedback from dominant group members because of the belief that stereotypes played a part in the overall decision." from the article Attributional Ambiguity.
  11. "This compliance-based model gave rise to the idea that tokenism was the reason an individual was hired into a company when they differed from the dominant group."[11]
  12. "The social justice model evolved next and extended the idea that individuals outside of the dominant group should be given opportunities within the workplace, not only because it was the law, but because it was the right thing to do."[11]
  13. "The plural organization has a more heterogeneous membership than the monolithic organization and takes steps to be more inclusive of persons from cultural backgrounds that differ from the dominant group."[11]
  14. "Standpoint theory suggests that marginalized groups bring a different perspective to an organization that challenges the status quo since their socially constructed world view will differ from that of the dominant group.[12]"[11]
  15. "Although the standpoint of the dominant group will often carry more weight, a transformational leader will encourage conflicting standpoints to coexist within an organization which will create a forum for sanctioned conflict to ensue."[11]
  16. "One of the greatest challenges an organization has when trying to adopt a more inclusive environment is assimilation for any member outside of the dominant group."[11]
  17. "Everything from organizational symbols, rituals, and stories serve to maintain the position of power held by the dominant group.[13]"[11]
  18. "Extending this concept to diversity inclusion where organizations seek to hire or promote individuals that are not part of this dominant group into management positions, a difficult tension develops between the socially constructed organizational norm and acceptance of cultural diversity."[11]
  19. "Hegemony refers to the dominant structure where one group is benefitting over others; however, the dominant group is not "doing" this to the other marginalized groups, all members are a part of actively participating and maintaining the dominant structure.[14]"[11]
  20. "Ardener’s 1975 muted group theory also posited that dominant group members formulate a “communication system that support their perception of the world and conceptualized it as ‘’the’’ appropriate language for the rest of society”.[15]", from the article Co-Cultural Communication Theory.
  21. "They noted 4 ways in which the non-dominant groups tend to communicate with the dominant groups.", from the article Co-Cultural Communication Theory.
  22. "They asserted also that, “From the perspective of the dominant group, the behaviors in each form of communication are appropriate.", from the article Co-Cultural Communication Theory.
  23. "The dynasty resided at Ráith Mór, east of Antrim in the Mag Line area and emerged as the dominant group among the Cruthin of Ulaid."[16] and "In the sixth and seventh centuries the Cruthin were a loose confederation of petty states with the Dal nAraidi emerging as the dominant group in the 8th century.[1]"[16]
  24. "Ethnoreligious communities define their ethnic identity neither exclusively by ancestral heritage nor simply by religious affiliation, but often through a combination of both[citation needed] (a long shared history; a cultural tradition of its own; either a common geographical origin, or descent from a small number of common ancestors; a common language, not necessarily peculiar to the group; a common literature peculiar to the group; a common religion different from that of neighbouring groups; being a minority or being an oppressed or a dominant group within a larger community).[citation needed]", from the article Ethnoreligious group.
  25. "being a minority or being an oppressed or dominant group within a larger community. For example, a conquered people (say, the inhabitants of England shortly after the Norman conquest) and their conquerors might both be ethnic groups", from the article Ethnoreligious group.
  26. "This has often been conceived to be a unidimensional, zero-sum cultural conflict in which the minority's culture is displaced by the dominant group's culture in a process of assimilation.", from the article Acculturation.
  27. "Beginning perhaps with Child (1943) and Lewin (1948), acculturation began to be conceived as the strategic reaction of the minority to continuous contact with the dominant group.", from the article Acculturation.
  28. "The dominant group unconsciously uses dominant social values to justify and rationalize social oppression, while often lacking awareness or understanding of the ways in which they are privileged on the basis of their social identities.[17]"[18] Google scholar does not have access to this book. It is cited as "[CITATION] Investigating Christian privilege and religious oppression in the United States WJ Blumenfeld, KY Joshi… - 2009 - Sense Publishers". Cannot confirm that inclusion of "dominant group" occurs as quoted from the article Christian privilege
  29. "Many overt forms of oppression are obvious when a dominant group tyrannizes a subordinate group; e.g. apartheid, slavery, ethnic cleansing, etc. However, many forms of oppression (and dominant group privilege) are not as apparent, especially to members of dominant groups.[17]"[18] Same as above regarding Google scholar access from the article Christian privilege.
  30. "Oppression occurs when the dominant group imposes its cultural norms, values, and perspectives on individuals (Hardiman & Jackson, 1997).[19]"[18] Source "(Hardiman & Jackson, 1997)" is available as pdf and the sentence "Oppression ... on individuals" does not occur in the text, from the article Christian privilege
  31. "Other ideas about Christian hegemony relate to the thinking of French philosopher Michel Foucault, who described how dominant-group oppression is advanced through “discourses” (Foucault, 1980).[20]"[18] Cannot confirm use of the phrase "dominant-group oppression" as Google scholar does not have access to Foucault 1980, from the article Christian privilege.
  32. "The term is used to describe the ways in which women, and other minority groups, are able to have a much clearer understanding of how the power structure works within a given society because they are not members of the dominant group.", from the article Epistemic advantage.
  33. "Uma Narayan points out that while it is in the interest of various subordinate groups to have knowledge of the dominant group, the dominant group does not have the same need.", from the article Epistemic advantage.
  34. "Because men are the dominant group in society, the male perception is also dominant. Women’s perceptions and systems of perceiving are seen as less competent.", from the article Muted group theory.
  35. "In order to become participating members in society, women must transform their perceptions and models of perceiving into terms of the dominant group", from the article Muted group theory.
  36. "Miller (2005) explains that muted group theory also posits that the dominant group in a culture (generally males) controls the various avenues of expression, including things like media outlets, the government and therefore the ways laws and rules are written, and the words that are used to describe the culture (i.e. books, dictionaries, etc).", from the article Muted group theory.
  37. "Because the dominant group controls these avenues, their style of expression will be favored. In the United States, for instance, evidence that white European males dominate the culture includes:", from the article Muted group theory.
  38. "The ways that the muted groups communicate will not be recognized or understood in the world of the dominant group.", from the article Muted group theory.
  39. "Some examples of these acts that members of muted groups can choose from are: emphasizing commonalities and downplaying cultural differences, educating others about norms of the muted group, and avoiding members of the dominant group.", from the article Muted group theory.
  40. "As an example, the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group in Germany is the Germans.", from the article Ethnonym.
  41. "The indigenous peoples of Africa are those peoples of Africa whose way of life, attachment or claims to particular lands, and social and political standing in relation to other more dominant groups have resulted in their substantial marginalisation within modern African states (viz., "indigeneity" for the purposes of this article has the narrow definition of "politically underprivileged group who have been an ethnic entity in the locality before the present ruling nation took over power"; see definitions and identity of indigenous peoples)."
  42. "Pierre Bourdieu discusses how the practices of dominant groups in society are legitimized to the disadvantage of subordinate groups.", from the article Dumbing down. See Discussion page for answer.
  43. "The capital of the district is Rawalakot with the Sudhan tribes being the dominant groups in the district." from the article Poonch District, Pakistan.
  44. "The Nupe, traditionally called the Tapa by the neighbouring Yoruba, are an ethnic group located primarily in the Middle Belt and northern Nigeria, and are the dominant group in Niger and an important minority in Kwara State." from the article Nupe people.
  45. "In the 1990s he was a member of the dominant group of Slovak humorists (with Stano Radič, Rasťo Piško and others) who appeared in several formats both on TV and radio commenting on political and social life in the country."[21]
  46. "Revenge of the cradle refers to when a minority group has a birthrate that is significantly higher than that of the dominant group." from the entry Revenge of the cradle.
  47. "The Daju appear to be the dominant group in Darfur from earliest times vying for control with their northern Marrah Mountain rivals, the agricultural Fur people." from the entry Daju people.
  48. "Numerically, the Khmer are the dominant group among Cambodians in France, but Cambodians of Chinese descent can also be found among the population; though interethnic marriages between Chinese and Khmers were common in Cambodia and remain so in France, the Chinese they have tended to organise themselves around dialect groups and remain somewhat separate from other Cambodians in France.[22]" from the entry Cambodians in France.
  49. "The dominant group in the villages were the Panthay, chiefly Hui migrants from Dali, Baoshan, Shanning, Menghua and elsewhere in southern and western Yunnan." from the entry Panglong.
  50. "Master suppression techniques are defined as strategies of social manipulation by which a dominant group maintains such a position in a (established or unexposed) hierarchy."[23]
  51. "In sociology, an elite is a group of relatively small size, that is dominant within a large society, having a privileged status perceived as being envied by others of a lower line of order.", from the article elite. There is this, also from 2011: "On state level the only contestants to noticeably influence the bureaucracy is the political elite. In general elites have to be groups of relatively small size, that are dominant within society, having a privileged status perceived as being envied by others of a lower line of order."[24] The following three are from the "View history", has the challenge been met? This example and the following three can be assessed together. I can't find any of these three in a resource accessible by Google scholar of prior date.
  52. "In sociology as in general usage, the elite is a group of relatively small size, that is dominant within a large society, having a privileged status perceived as being envied by others of a lower line of order."[25]
  53. "In sociology as in general usage, the elite is a hypothetical group of relatively small size, that is dominant within a large society, having a privileged status perceived as being envied by others of a lower line of order."[26]
  54. "In sociology as in general usage, the elite (the "elect"; sometimes the French form "élite" is used) is a relatively small dominant group within a larger society, which enjoys a privileged status which is upheld by individuals of lower social status within the structure of a group."[27] From a master's degree thesis, there is this: "We can define [the elite] in the following way; the elite is a relatively small dominant group within a larger society, which enjoys a privileged status which is upheld by individuals of lower social status within the structure of a group."[28] Hint: one reference listed is www.en.wikipedia.org.
  55. "Insecurity and fear of an unknown future and instability can result in displacement, exclusion, and forced assimilation into the dominant group."[29] Cannot confirm origin, from the former entry Marginalization. The marginalization entry has been redirected to social exclusion.
  56. "The individual is forced into a new system of rules while facing social stigma and stereotypes from the dominant group in society, further marginalizing and excluding individuals (Young, 2000)."[29] Cannot confirm origin, do not have access to Young 2000, from the article Marginalization. The marginalization entry has been redirected to social exclusion.
  57. "The dominant Group C formula Porsche 962 s by Porsche under the new Group C race car formula that encouraged fuel efficiency.", from 24 Hours of Le Mans.
  58. "Including atrocities committed with impunity against communal groups and/or specific groups singled out by state authorities, or by dominant groups, for persecution or repression.", from Failed state.
  59. "From an American conservative standpoint, color blindness is generally perceived as an issue of fairness rather than an attempt to provide an advantage to either socially dominant groups or minority groups.", from the article Color blindness (race). The entire section of the article entitled, "Definition" containing "dominant group" has been blanked by a user[30].
  60. "Supporters of affirmative action believe that the perceived injustice to the dominant group is not supported by facts.", from Racism in the United States.
  61. "The dominance hierarchy also comes into play, as the offspring of the more dominant group members get preferential treatment." from Chlorocebus.
  62. "It is a trend displayed since historical times created by its unique Newari people who continue to be one of the dominant groups in the city.", from Kathmandu.
  63. "Those cultures have gained cultural capital and are considered the dominant group among the rest.", from Cultural reproduction.
  64. "The dominant group are of European stock, the descendants of colonists, known as colons.", from San Serriffe.
  65. "Ascribed statuses are determined by the dominant groups in society and as a result, minorities are often assigned lower statuses.", from Ascribed status.
  66. "Social order is maintained by certain rules of expected behavior and dominant group members enforce order through punishment." from Evolution of morality and Evolutionary origin of religions.
  67. "Barbudans of Portuguese descent, status differences were based on the varying degrees of assimilation into the dominant group's Anglicized practices.", from Antigua and Barbuda.
  68. "These traditions suggest that they were a very populous people and the dominant group in Wisconsin in the century before Nicolet's visit.", from Ho-Chunk.
  69. "Barbudans, status differences move along a continuum of varying degrees of assimilation into the Anglicised practices of the dominant group.", from Antigua.
  70. "That Afrikaans was first language to two thirds of the people (the dominant group, at 52 percent, were ‘Coloureds’) could have been a significant further factor.[31]" from History of the Northern Cape. The abstract sentence is "In addition, most inhabitants are Afrikaans-speaking (70%), with the so-called coloureds (almost 52%) as the dominant group."[31]
  71. "Creoles Today: They are the dominant group in Politics.", from Seychellois Creole people.
  72. "Second-generation immigrants: passing as a member of the dominant group.", from Cultural dissonance.
  73. "According to some traditions, the Bayar are connected to the Bhar tribes, who were once the dominant group in eastern Uttar Pradesh.", from Bayar caste.
  74. "Ricardo Salles said that although his character "evidenced a conservative mind, typical of a dominant group of a socially hierarchical society divided by slavery, there is no reason to deduce based on that he conducted the army without regard to reduce to the maximum the human losses, in battle or by diseases".", from the article Luís Alves de Lima e Silva, Duke of Caxias. See Answers on Discussion page.
  75. Progressive stack: "The theory behind the progressive stack is that people who are part of the majority or dominant culture are generally encouraged to express themselves, while people from minority or non-dominant groups are mostly silenced or ignored."
  76. Progressive stack: "In practice, "majority culture" is typically interpreted by progressive stack practitioners to mean white or male or young adult, while non-dominant groups include women, people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, non-white people, and very young or older people.[32][33]"
  77. Progressive stack: "In meetings that use the progressive stack, people from non-dominant groups are sometimes allowed to speak before people from dominant groups, by facilitators, or stack-keepers, urging speakers to "step forward, or step back" based on which racial, age, or gender group they belong to.[34]"
  78. "Privilege differs from conditions of overt prejudice, in which a dominant group actively seeks to oppress or suppress another group for its own advantage."[35]

Dominant group on wikiquote[edit]

Here is a summary list of the test questions.

  1. Are any of these uses of dominant group original research or original synthesis?
  2. Should each sentence using dominant group have a reference or citation after it?
  3. Are any of the uses of dominant group plagiarism?
  4. As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?
  5. What you would do if you found each sentence (for each sentence) on Wikipedia, or on Wikiversity?
  6. Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?
  7. How would you edit the entry or the current page on Wikipedia or Wikiversity?

Separately, write what you believe about each of these with respect to

  1. original research or synthesis,
  2. attribution,
  3. copyright, and
  4. a step by step procedure of what to do if you (or anyone) finds anything similar on Wikipedia or Wikiversity.

The current page is either within the quote, before the quote, after the quote as a reference, or indicated after the reference to the author who contributed dominant group to the page.

  1. "The first precondition is exclusion of the victim from the universe of obligation of the dominant group.", from Armenian Genocide.
  2. "Such groups are viewed by the dominant group as people who do not belong, to whom nothing is owed, who do not have to be accounted for, and to whom one need not account.", same as above.
  3. "Utopia tends to be the tool of social groups seeking ascendancy; while ideology tends to be the tool of dominant groups seeking to assuage their own sense of failing and justify the inadequacy of the status quo." per Karl Mannheim.
  4. From Indian Railways: "The dominant group was determined to hold on to remaining power of appointments in India as long as they could. relating to India with the group."

Dominant group on wikisource[edit]

There are 12 current usages.

  1. "I am sure I understand the purpose of the dominant group of the Senate.", from An Association of Nations.
  2. "The dominant group frightfully exaggerates their numbers and power.", per On Questions of Zionist Theory.
  3. Per The Age of Innocence/Chapter VI: "Firmly narrowing upward from this wealthy but inconspicuous substratum was the compact and dominant group which the Mingotts, Newlands, Chiverses and Mansons so actively represented."
  4. From Skinner v. Oklahoma/Opinion of the Court: "In evil or reckless hands it can cause races or types which are inimical to the dominant group to wither and disappear."

Hypotheses[edit]

Main source: Hypotheses
  1. Based on this term test, too many contributors on Wikipedia are performing original research through the use of dominant group.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Lambiam (July 19, 2010). "The Establishment Revision as of 07:14, 19 July 2010, In: Wikipedia". Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  2. Seymour Martin Lipset (August 1963). "The value patterns of democracy: A case study in comparative analysis". American Sociological Review 28 (4): 515-31. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2090068. Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  3. Niko481 (February 22, 2006). "Minority group Revision as of 00:24, 22 February 2006, In: Wikipedia". Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  4. Fegin, Joe R.; Joe R. Fegin (1984 (2nd edition)). Racial and Ethnic Relations. Prentice-Hall. pp. 10. ISBN 0-13-75012-0. 
  5. Bohmanlars (November 30, 2008). Minority group Revision as of 09:13, 30 November 2008, In: Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Minority_group&diff=254963676&oldid=254677957. Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 Fastifex (March 16, 2006). "Minority group Revision as of 14:39, 16 March 2006, In: Wikipedia". Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  7. 67.173.39.3 (February 26, 2006). "Minority group Revision as of 19:05, 26 February 2006, In: Wikipedia". Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  8. Ntennis (May 14, 2006). "Minority group Revision as of 03:30, 14 May 2006, In: Wikipedia". Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  9. Ntennis (May 14, 2006). "Minority group Revision as of 03:55, 14 May 2006, In: Wikipedia". Retrieved 2011-10-09. 
  10. Pfaffenberger, Bryan (1985). "Vellalar domination". Man 20 (1): 158. 
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 "Diversity (business), In: Wikipedia". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. August 10, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-28. 
  12. Allen, Brenda J. (September 1995). "Diversity and Organizational Communication". Journal of Applied Communication Research 23: 143–55. doi:10.1080/00909889509365420. 
  13. Mumby, Dennis (1988). Communication and Power in Organizations. New York: Ablex Publishing. pp. 1–210. ISBN 978-1-56750-160-5. 
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External links[edit]