Dominant group/Anthropology/Term test

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Cast members of the play "White's Lies" pose for this photograph. Here used to represent a dominant anthropological group. Credit: Cristina V.

The technical or scientific term dominant group occurs in about 280 articles on Wikipedia and in several entries on other WMF projects. Some of these may be considered part of anthropology. None of the sentences containing dominant group in each article seems to be attributed (cited or referenced to a source). What would you do?

Below in the sections, including "Dominant group on wikipedia", is a partial list.

Some of these occurrences have a right or wrong answer, but many may be open to debate.

Read through each of the following learning guides, then take the test.

Prepare to defend your answers and enjoy this learning resource!

Some of the answers are listed on the 'Discuss' page for this learning resource. Be bold.

Original research[edit]

Some hints about original research can be found in original research inquiry or original research.

For evaluating the occurrences of "dominant group", here is the associated 'original research' question:

Are any of these uses of "dominant group" original research or original synthesis?

Attribution[edit]

Main sources: Law/Attributions and Attributioms

Hints about attribution can be found in this article, dominant group|attribution and copyright.

Should each sentence using "dominant group" have a reference or citation after it?

Are any of the uses of "dominant group" plagiarism?

Copyright[edit]

Main sources: Law/Copyrights and Copyrights

Please keep in mind that the copyright policy on Wikipedia (or any of the WMF projects) is in line with WMF desires to sell educational materials such as books in countries and political regions that may have a much more restrictive copyright law than the USA where the WMF is located.

This is a learning resource for Wikiversity that you may enjoy with respect to publication in the US. Please refrain from making any actual changes to Wikipedia, or any project, unless and until you are sure these changes are in line with local project policy.

Hints about copyright can be found in this article, "dominant group/attribution and copyright".

As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?

What to do[edit]

What would you do if you found each sentence (for each sentence) on Wikipedia, or any of the WMF projects?

Some hints can be found in this article, dominant group/attribution and copyright.

Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?

Dominant group on wikipedia[edit]

Here is a summary list of the test questions.

  1. Are any of these uses of "dominant group" original research or original synthesis?
  2. Should each sentence using "dominant group" have a reference or citation after it?
  3. Are any of the uses of "dominant group" plagiarism?
  4. As each sentence stands, is it a copyright violation?
  5. What you would do if you found each sentence (for each sentence) on Wikipedia, or on Wikiversity?
  6. Should you put a notice on a notice board somewhere on either site to let others know what some author or editor did, or didn't do?
  7. How would you edit the entry or the current page on Wikipedia or Wikiversity?

Separately, write what you believe about each of these with respect to

  1. original research or synthesis,
  2. attribution,
  3. copyright, and
  4. a step by step procedure of what to do if you (or anyone) finds anything similar on Wikipedia or Wikiversity.

The current page is either within the quote, before the quote or indicated after the reference to the author who contributed "dominant group" to the page.

Some hints occur after several of these examples.

  1. "Siah-Posh (black-Robed) Kafirs was the former designation of the major and dominant group of the Hindukush Kafirs inhabiting the Bashgul (Kam) valley of the Kafiristan, now called Nuristan." Siah-Posh Kafirs.
  2. "Vellalar amongst Sri Lankan Tamils are a dominant group of formerly agricultural landlord related caste from Sri Lanka that is found amongst all walks of life and around the world as part of the Sri Lankan Tamil diaspora.[1], per Wikipedia Vellalar of Sri Lanka.
  3. "Pushtuns, mainly Persian speaking, educated and urban were the dominant group in Parcham but non-Pushtuns were also represented in cadres.", from the article Parcham.
  4. "Also, social differentiation became more pronounced: a small dominant group ruled over the majority of the population.", from Mesoamerican chronology.
  5. "By the time Spanish explorers arrived in the sixteenth century, the dominant group were the Tongva people.", from Long Beach, California.
  6. South Dakota: "By the early 19th century, the Sioux had largely replaced the Arikara as the dominant group in the area.[2]"
  7. History of Nigeria before 1500: "Historically the Yoruba have been the dominant group on the west bank of the Niger."
  8. Bahrain: "The Al Bin Ali were the dominant group controlling the town of Zubarah on the Qatar peninsula,[3][4] originally the center of power of the Bani Utbah."
  9. Diarmait mac Áedo Sláine: "Other groups descended from the sons of Diarmait included Clann Cholmáin, or more precisely Clann Cholmáin Már, descended from Colmán Már, which replaced the Síl nÁedo Sláine as the dominant group of the southern Uí Néill from the middle of the 8th century, and the less important Caílle Follamain or Clann Cholmáin Bicc, descended from Colmán Beg."
  10. History of Eurasia: "[w:Homo neanderthalensis|Homo neanderthalensis]], with his Mousterian technology emerged, in areas from Europe to western Asia, after this and continued to be the dominant group of humans in Europe and Middle East up until 70000-40000 ybp."
  11. Kata people: "The Katir/Katir or Kata Kafir group was numerically the most dominant group of the Siah-Posh (Turkish "Black Scarf") tribes."
  12. Ajmer-Merwara: "They were defeated by the Chauhan Kings Rao Anoop and Rao Anhal, whose descendents the Rawat-Thakurs and Cheeta-Kathat were the dominant group here."
  13. Blathmac mac Áedo Sláine: "Other groups descended from the sons of Diarmait included Clann Cholmáin, or more precisely Clann Cholmáin Már, descended from Colmán Már, which replaced the Síl nÁedo Sláine as the dominant group of the southern Uí Néill from the middle of the 8th century, and the less important Caílle Follamain or Clann Cholmáin Bicc, descended from Colmán Beg."
  14. Comancheria: "Pekka Hämäläinen (2008) argues that from the 1750s to the 1850s, the Comanches were the dominant group in the Southwest, and the domain they ruled was known as Comancheria."
  15. Alum Creek State Park: "They were displaced by the arriving colonial settlers and the Iroquois Indians who were the dominant group in the area."
  16. History of Hong Kong under Imperial China: "The Hakka people became the dominant group to occupy the territory,[5] today they are integrated into the very fabric of Hong Kong with many traditional villages still in place in the New Territories."
  17. History of the Philippines (1521–1898): "The previously dominant groups resisted Spanish rule, refusing to pay Spanish taxes and rejecting Spanish excesses."
  18. History of Darfur: "The Daju, inhabitants of Jebel Marra, appear to have been the dominant group in Darfur in the earliest period recorded."
  19. Economic history of Iran: "Economic and social polarization minimized competition among businesses and limited development to the part of the economy concerned with the interests of dominant groups closely tied to the shah’s court and the state."
  20. History of Nigeria: "Historically the Yoruba people have been the dominant group on the west bank of the Niger."
  21. Demographic history of Bosnia and Herzegovina: "In general, Muslims were the dominant group in most developed urban centers of the country."
  22. History of the University of California, Riverside: "But it was the dominant group that was hired here primarily to teach and who didn’t want to do research ... and he was supposed to change this.[6]"
  23. History of New Mexico: "Scholar Hämäläinen (2008) argues that from the 1750s to the 1850s, the Comanches were the dominant group in the Southwest, and the domain they ruled was known as Comancheria."
  24. History of Saskatchewan: "The dominant groups comprised British settlers from eastern Canada and Britain, who comprised about 50% of the population during the late 19th and early 20th centuries."
  25. History of Bulgaria: "Thraco-Romans became a dominant group in the region, and eventually yielded several military commanders and emperors such as Galerius and Constantine I the Great."
  26. Indo-Greeks: "Because the Ionians were either the first of the most dominant group among the Greeks with whom people in the east came in contact, the Persians called all of them Yauna, and the Indians used Yona and Yavana for them"[7]
  27. History of Texas: "Hämäläinen (2008) argues that from the 1750s to the 1850s, the Comanches were the dominant group in the Southwest, and the domain they ruled was known as Comancheria. Hämäläinen calls it an empire."
  28. Merina people: "The Merina are the dominant "highlander" Malagasy ethnic group in Madagascar, and one of the country's eighteen official ethnic groups.[1][2]" and "The Merina emerged as the politically dominant group in the course of the 17th and 18th century."
  29. Kings of Dál nAraidi: "The dynasty resided at Ráith Mór, east of Antrim in the Mag Line area and emerged as the dominant group among the Cruthin of Ulaid. In the sixth and seventh centuries the Cruthin were a loose confederation of petty states with the Dal nAraidi emerging as the dominant group in the 8th century.[1]"
  30. Indigenous peoples of Africa: "The indigenous people of Africa are those people of Africa whose way of life, attachment or claims to particular lands, and social and political standing in relation to other more dominant groups have resulted in their substantial marginalisation within modern African states (viz., "indigeneity" for the purposes of this article has the narrow definition of "politically underprivileged group who have been an ethnic entity in the locality before the present ruling nation took over power"; see definitions and identity of indigenous peoples)." and "Their traditional practices and land claims often have come into conflict with the objectives and policies promulgated by governments, companies and surrounding dominant societies."
  31. Island Caribs: "At the time of Spanish contact, the Caribs were one of the dominant groups in the Caribbean, which owes its name to them."
  32. Qahtanite: "Another dominant group among the Arab people are variously known as Adnan, Ma'add or Nizar." Statement was removed on 25 August 2014.
  33. Indigenous peoples: "The legislation is based on the conclusion that certain indigenous people are vulnerable to exploitation, marginalization and oppression by nation states formed from colonising populations or by politically dominant, different ethnic groups.", "A defining characteristic for an indigenous group is that it has preserved traditional ways of living, such as present or historical reliance upon subsistence-based production (based on pastoral, horticultural and/or hunting and gathering techniques), and a predominantly non-urbanized society.", and "Groups and communities who do claim this recognition are those who by a variety of historical and environmental circumstances have been placed outside of the dominant state systems, and whose traditional practices and land claims often come into conflict with the objectives and policies promulgated by governments, companies and surrounding dominant societies." Dominant society is a synonym for dominant group.
  34. Poonch District, Pakistan: "The capital of the district is Rawalakot with the Sudhan, Awans tribes being the dominant groups in the district."
  35. Nupe people: "The Nupe, traditionally called the Tapa by the neighbouring Yoruba, are an ethnic group located primarily in the Middle Belt and northern Nigeria, and are the dominant group in Niger State and an important minority in Kwara State."
  36. Samaritan Revolts: "The events irreversibly shifted the demographics of the region, making the Christians the only dominant group in the Palaestina Prima province for many decades onward."
  37. Afro-Surinamese: "Gloria Wekker, [...] and other theorists, argue that African cultural retentions are found most often in Afro-diasporic communities that either had irregular contact with dominant groups of the host community or that shielded their cultural retentions from their colonizers." and "The Akans of Fanti subgroup (a subgroup exported, at least, from Ivory Coast) and Ashanti (from the Ashanti Region, in central Ghana) were, legally, the predominant group among slaves in Suriname."

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Pfaffenberger, Bryan (1985). "Vellalar domination". Man 20 (1): 158. 
  2. Schell, pp. 18–21.
  3. Arabia's Frontiers: The Story of Britain's Boundary Drawing in the Desert, John C. Wilkinson, p44
  4. Around the Coast, Amin Reehani, p297
  5. Barber, Nicola. [2004] (2004) Hong Kong. Gareth Stevens Publishing. ISBN 0-8368-5198-6
  6. "Adrian Oral History Transcript". 
  7. A.K. Narain (1957). The Indo-Greeks. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

{{Dominant group}}{{Linguistics resources}}{{Semantics resources}}{{Terminology resources}}