Dominant group/Courses

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Ruffles and lace are dominant in the fashions of the day. Credit: SLQbot.

Any course on dominant group is likely to serve as a suggestion for reading through, studying, and researching "what is dominant group?", or perhaps "what are dominant groups?"

Hopefully, as each student reaches an apparent terminus on their course to understand and perhaps successfully cope with dominant groups as they find them, they will also come to appreciate the need to reduce domination where or when it is harmful and increase it when or where it is beneficial.

Prerequisites[edit]

Having prerequisites for a course on or about dominant group is a bit like a course on exploitation. If you have been exploited all your life, you've probably acquired all the prerequisites you need to start to understand it, research it, and benefit from it.

Completion levels[edit]

These courses are dynamic. Changes and additions should help to improve the depth and quality of the resources involved.

Lectures[edit]

The category of dominant group lectures contains many of the efforts to discover and explore the literature where dominant group and its synonyms have been found.

Quizzes[edit]

Quizzes exist and more are being generated to challenge you regarding what dominant groups are and to explore the concepts behind dominance and its synonyms such as ruling.

Laboratories[edit]

These include at least one example. The idea is for you to construct an experiment regarding a dominant group, then record, discuss, and conclude about your results.

Lessons[edit]

These are participatory original research projects focused on one hypothesis each about dominant group.

Problem sets[edit]

Can you tell when you are a member of a dominated or dominate group? These problem sets may help you to identify "unfair advantages", slavery, despotism, or other aspects of dominant group behavior.

Student participations[edit]

Dominant group has been the number ten Wikiversity project two years (2014 & 2015, statistics on projects are not available for 2016) in a row.

Hypotheses[edit]

Main source: Hypotheses
  1. A member of a dominated group can "turn the tables" on a dominant group.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]