Literature/2008/Cronin

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Cronin, Blaise & Lokman I. Meho (2008). "The shifting balance of intellectual trade in information studies," Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, vol. 59, no. 4 (15 February 2008): 551–564.

Authors[edit | edit source]

Blaise Cronin
Lokman I. Meho

Abstract[edit | edit source]

The authors describe a large-scale, longitudinal citation analysis of intellectual trading between information studies and cognate disciplines. The results of their investigation reveal the extent to which information studies draws on and, in turn, contributes to the ideational substrates of other academic domains. Their data show that the field has become a more successful exporter of ideas as well as less introverted than was previously the case. In the last decade, information studies has begun to contribute significantly to the literatures of such disciplines as computer science and engineering on the one hand and business and management on the other, while also drawing more heavily on those same literatures. [c 1]

Introduction[edit | edit source]

Citation analysis is a powerful means of mapping the flow of ideas between specialty groups, disciplines, and nation states (e.g., Liu & Wang, 2005; Peritz & Bar-Ilan, 2002; Urata, 1990). The matrices and maps produced by bibliometricians and others can be used to demonstrate the relative impact and perceived utility of research, all the way from a single article on topic X to the entire published output of a nation state in a discipline, in both domestic (intradisciplinary) and foreign (extradisciplinary) markets. Here we describe a large-scale citation analysis of intellectual trading between information studies and other disciplines. The results of our study reveal the extent to which information studies draws on and, in turn, contributes to the ideational bases of other academic domains. For an overview of the theory and application of citation analysis, the reader is referred to Garfield (1979).

Excerpts[edit | edit source]

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w: information science

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  1. Free information would be one definite aspect of the recent information revolution, if any. The idea of information as commodity was so deep-rooted, especially in computer industry. Informative essays used to be too split up and mixed up with advertizing bits and pieces in American commercial computer magazines. It was too hard for, so to speak, tall and digitall librarians to break with this idea. So it remained more likely the vision of information scientists, perhaps as best envisioned by H. G. Wells, especially in his World Encyclopedia (1938). The influence of information science on others may rise from him among a few others, though he was basically a textualist.
        Free and good texts as Wells well envisioned may not be everything of itself, that is, without the cognitive or knowing subject. As such it could hardly explain why the information revolution or cognitive revolution had to occur. We have to deal with texts but break with logic-centered textualism and join with human-centered contextualism, as perhaps best shown by Ogden & Richards (1923).
        Information science prefers human-computer interaction while computer science prefers dehumanizing computing AI, namely, cognitivism or computationalism. Texts and our attention to them should turn out to do good to the society after all, as perhaps best shown by Bernal (1939). Citation analysis may be not so good to recognize explicitly their contributions to information science, which at its best may act as metascience or science of science. The influence of metascience on sciences is self-evident.

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."