Literature/1969/Kochen

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Kochen, Manfred (1969). "Stability in the Growth of Knowledge." American Documentation, 20 (3): 186-197.

Excerpts[edit]

  • Priority is given to evaluation and synthesis above access.
  • Cassidy ... [1] draws a distinction between knowledge, understanding, and wisdom. He points out that, while knowledge results from analytic activity, understanding results from synthetic activity, such as the invention of a connection between apples and planets.[2] [...] He stresses that "fragmentation of knowledge and experience opposes wisdom; excessive specialization, while it may give deep understanding, does not confer wisdom." (p. 192)
  • I have tried to demonstrate that a new scientific discipline is emerging. We might call it epistemo-dynamics. It is concerned with lawful regularities governing the acquisition of information and its transformation into knowledge, the assimilation of knowledge into understanding, the fusion of understanding into wisdom. These dynamic processes are presumed to occur in nature, of which evolving man and his societies are part. Nature, in its wisdom to date, has always evolved enough self-regulating mechanisms to ensure stability at all levels.

See also[edit]

  • Kochen, Manfred (1965). Some Problems in Information Science. Scarecrow Press. (Jan 1, 1965) [^]
  • Kochen, Manfred (1969). "Stability in the Growth of Knowledge." American Documentation, 20 (3): 186-197. [^]
  • Kochen, Manfred (1972). "WISE: A World Information Synthesis and Encyclopaedia." Journal of Documentation, 28: 322-341. [^]
  • Kochen, Manfred, ed. (1975). Information for Action: from Knowledge to Wisdom. New York: Academic Press. [^]
  • Kochen, Manfred (1987). "How Well Do We Acknowledge Intellectual Debts?" Journal of Documentation, 43 (1): 54-64. [^]
  • Kochen, Manfred, ed. (1989). The Small World: A Volume of Recent Research Advances Commemorating Ithiel de Sola Pool, Stanley Milgram, Theodore Newcomb. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corp. (January 1, 1989). [^]

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Notes[edit]

  1. Cassidy, H. G., "Liberation and Limitation," in: Sweeney, S. (ed.) The Knowledge Explosion: Liberation and Limitation, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York, 1966, p. 188.
  2. This refers, of course, to the story by which Newton may have hit upon the law of universal gravitation during that summer when, at age 21, because Cambridge University was closed due to the plague and he had to while away his time at home, he discovered the telescope, the law of gravitation and the use of fluxions (differential calculus). The association between an apple falling from a tree or from heights visible only by telescope, and the moon, is not so far-fetched.
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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."