Literature/1987/Kochen

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Kochen, Manfred (1987). "How Well Do We Acknowledge Intellectual Debts?" Journal of Documentation, 43 (1): 54-64.

Excerpts[edit]

A paper that conforms to the norms of scholarly perfection would explicitly cite every past publication to which it owes an intellectual debt. Not knowing what he should acknowledge his intellectual debt to is no excuse for omission, any more than ignorance of the law can excuse its violation. Acknowledgement of intellectual debt is not the only function of the paper's bibliography.[1] It indicates the author's actual source of ideas, which may not be the true origin of the idea. It directs the reader to further information. It meets others' expectations about the content of a scholarly paper. There are many other reasons for citing.

From Introduction (p. 54)

Author[edit]

He is perhaps the earliest pioneer in the small world phenomenon, and an enthusiastic world brainist, as dubbed by Eugene Garfield in memoriam (1989), who himself is another in effect as he founded the Science Citation Index only to prefer the World Brain (1938) in global perspective to the Memex (1939, 1945) [2] in personal perspective of information management. [3]

It is an irony and pity that the relevant academics neglect to acknowledge their intellectual debts and pay due homage to Kochen,[4] the pioneer of the "small world" above all. They may fatally endanger the fair free market as well as academic morality. Take seriously why and how serious it is. Such unfairness or injustice may give way to the recent emergence of Pirate Party, WikiLeaks, and twitter in a year, 2006!

Selected publications

Wikimedia[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. Moravcsik, M. J. & Murugesan P. "Some results on the function and quality of citations." Soc. Stud. Sci. 5: 85-92. 1975.
  2. The Memex is, so to speak, a mechanical memory index to allow brain-like rapid, random access to information, hence the title "As We May Think."
  3. It is simply untrue and misleading for Wikipedia to describe as if Garfield had been mainly inspired by Bush's idea of Memex, especially without mentioning Wells's World Brain. See the details on the Talk: Eugene Garfield page.
  4. No information but just redirection to the small world experiment.
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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."