Literature/1938/Wells

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Wells, H. G. (1938). World Brain. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran & Co.

Reprints[edit]

  • Mayne, Alan J., ed. (1993). World Brain: H. G. Wells on the Future of World Education. London, UK: Adamantine Press. [^]
    • Critical Introduction, pp. 1-70
    • World Brain (reprint), pp. 71-154
    • Annotated Bibliography, pp. 155-180

Excerpts[edit]

My particular line of country has always been generalization and synthesis. I dislike isolated events and disconnected details. I really hate statements, views, prejudices and beliefs that jump at you suddenly out of mid-air. I like my world as coherent and consistent as possible. So far at any rate my temperament is that of a scientific man. And that is why I have spent a few score thousand hours of my particular allotment of vitality in making outlines of history, short histories of the world, general accounts of the science of life, attempts to bring economic, financial and social life into one conspectus and even, still more desperate, struggles to estimate the possible consequences of this or that set of operating causes upon the future of mankind. All these attempts had profound and conspicuous faults and weaknesses; even my friends are apt to mention them with an apologetic smile; presumptuous and preposterous they were, I admit, but I look back upon them, completely unabashed. Somebody had to break the ice. Somebody had to try out such summaries on the general mind. My reply to the superior critic has always been--forgive me--"Damn you, do it better." (p. 3-4)

Excerpt from World Encyclopaedia (Lecture delivered at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, Weekly Evening Meeting, Friday, November 20th, 1936) p. 3-35.

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."