Literature/1937

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  • Beginnings in Documentation

ASIS&T was founded on March 13, 1937, as the American Documentation Institute (ADI), a service organization made up of individuals nominated by and representing affiliated scientific and professional societies, foundations and government agencies. Its initial interest was in the development of microfilm as an aid to information dissemination. ADI compiled an impressive record of achievement in its early years: development of microfilm readers, cameras and services; fostering negotiations and research which resulted in the so-called "gentleman's agreement" covering the photo duplication of copyrighted materials; establishment of programs for the storage and reproduction of auxiliary publications in support of journal editors; operation of an Oriental scientific literature service during World War II; support of interlingua, an early rival of Esperanto, to foster international science communications; and co-sponsoring of the 1958 International Conference on Scientific Information.

History of ASIS&T [1] http://www.asis.org/history.html

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Notes[edit]

  1. Quick Facts

    ``ASIS&T has existed for over 60 years and has over 4,000 members worldwide.``

    Vision

    ``Establish a new information professionalism in a world where information is of central importance to personal, social, political, and economic progress by: Advancing knowledge about information, its creation, properties, and use; Providing analysis of ideas, practices, and technologies; Valuing theory, research, applications, and service; Nurturing new perspectives, interests, and ideas; Increasing public awareness of the information sciences and technologies and their benefits to society.``

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."