Literature/1905/Wells

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Wells, H. G. (1905). A Modern Utopia. New York, NY: Penguin Group, 2005.

Excerpts[edit]

  • A little army of attendants would be at work upon his index day and night... constantly engaged in checking back thumb-marks and numbers, and incessant stream of information would come, of births, of deaths, of arrivals at inns, or applications to post-offices for letters, of tickets taken for long journeys, of criminal convictions, marriages, applications for public doles and the like.... So the inventory of the State would watch its every man and the wide world write its history as the fabric of its destiny flowed on. [c 1]

Wikimedia[edit]

w: A Modern Utopia

Chronology[edit]

Reviews[edit]

  • June Deery refers to A Modern Utopia as a work in progress for two obvious reasons: (1) it is about social and technological advance and (2) Wells stresses that he is describing a dynamic Utopia .... This means that this modern society requires and allows further improvement. [1] [1]

Comments[edit]

  1. This is quoted in: Reagle Jr., Joseph Michael (2010). Good Faith Collaboration: The Culture of Wikipedia. MIT Press. [^] (p. 24) to point out that Wells was keen on information management long before World Brain (1938). This also suggests the likelihood that the "microfilm rapid selector" might have been used in searching finger prints.

Notes[edit]

  1. Deery, June (1993). "H.G. Wells's A Modern Utopia as a Work in Progress." Extrapolation (Kent State University Press) 34(3): 216-229.
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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."