Literature/2011/Grudin

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Grudin, Jonathan (2011). "Human-Computer Interaction," in: Cronin, B., ed. (2011), Annual Review of Information Science and Technology 45: 369-430.

Authors[edit | edit source]

1997-2003
Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction
2006-2011
Edit and write column on HCI history for ACM Interactions

Summary[edit | edit source]

The history of library and information science is covered here, along with HCI research in human factors, information systems, and computer science (CHI).

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Wikimedia[edit | edit source]

w: Human-computer interaction
w: Category:History of human–computer interaction

Chronology[edit | edit source]

  • Grudin, Jonathan (2011). "Human-Computer Interaction," in: Cronin, B., ed. (2011), Annual Review of Information Science and Technology 45: 369-430. [^]
  • Grudin, Jonathan & Donald Norman (1991). "Language evolution and human-computer interaction." Proc. Cognitive Science Conference, 611-616. (PDF). The forces that shape languages provide insights into limitations of consistency in interaction design.
  • Grudin, Jonathan & A. MacLean (1984). "Adapting a psychophysical method to measure performance and preference tradeoffs in human-computer interaction." Proc. INTERACT '84, 737-741. (PDF). More a poster than a paper, my first HCI study identified a distinction that 20 years later shaped my view of HCI history.

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."