Literature/1949/Shaw

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Shaw, Ralph R. (1949). "Machines and the Bibliographical Problems of the Twentieth Century." (pp. 37-71) In: L. N. Ridenour, et al. Bibliography in an Age of Science. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Wikimedia[edit]

w: Ralph R. Shaw
w: Vannevar Bush
w: Emanuel Goldberg
  • After four years working for Zeiss subsidiaries in France, Goldberg moved to Palestine in 1937 where he established a laboratory, later called Goldberg Instruments, which became the Electro-Optical Industries ("El-Op") in Rehovot. A photograph taken 1943 by John Phillips for Life Magazine shows Goldberg in his work shop in Palestine. [1]

Chronology[edit]

See also[edit]

  • Shaw, R. R. (1949). "The Rapid Selector." Journal of Documentation', 5: 164-171.

Shaw (1949a) provides a convenient introduction to microfilm selectors. A postscript to this paper by E. M. R. Ditmas incorrectly cites the technical report by Engineering Research Associates (1949) on the ERA microfilm rapid selector as PB 97 535 instead of PB 97 313, an error repeated by some subsequent writers. Bagg and Stevens (1961) provide the best historical account of microfilm selector development, albeit incomplete with respect to Goldberg, which can be supplemented by the later account by Alexander and Rose (1964). G. W. W. Stevens (1968, chap. 12) provides a summary, as does the International Federation for Documentation (1964, chap. 9).


From http://people.ischool.berkeley.edu/~buckland/goldbush.html

Comments[edit]


Notes[edit]

  1. Two years later, that magazine happened to reprint Vannevar Bush's "[[w: As We May Think|]]" related to Goldberg's (1931) patent.
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