Motivation and emotion/Tutorials/Physiological needs

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Tutorial 03: Physiological needs

Wikiversity.logo.svg Resource type: this resource contains a tutorial or tutorial notes.

This is the third tutorial for the Motivation and emotion unit of study.



Overview[edit | edit source]

This tutorial:

  1. introduces brain structures which are relevant to motivation and emotion
  2. discusses the motivational and emotional role of neurotransmitters and hormones
  3. assists with book chapter topic development

Physiological aspects of motivation and emotion[edit | edit source]

Important physiological elements of our motivational and emotional experiences include brain structures, neurotransmitters, and hormones. Whilst each of these components serves particular functions, they also communicate directly or indirectly with one another to work dynamically and holistically.

Brain structures[edit | edit source]

The purpose of this section is to become familiar with brain structures which have important motivational and emotional functions.

Activity: Mix and match activity in small groups

  1. Go to the mix and match spreadsheet:
    Brain structure mix and match activity
  2. Allocate your name to one of the structures and research the correct answer. Once finished, select any that are free until the task is complete.
  3. As a group, discuss and review the answers. Then delete the answers and try again. Second time around, group members should select different structures. Aim to complete the exercise at least twice.
Brain structures linked to Wikipedia articles and videos
  1. Overview brain diagram (note: useful summary, but not all structures of interest are listed)
Cortical
  1. Cerebral cortex (Frontal lobes)
  2. Anterior cingulate cortex
  3. Dorsolateral cortex
  4. Orbitofrontal cortex
  5. Prefrontal cortex
  6. Ventromedial cortex
Sub-cortical
  1. Amygdala - Video (19 secs) Video
  2. Basal ganglia
  3. Hypothalamus - Video (23 secs)
  4. Insula
Brain limbicsystem.jpg
  1. Reticular formation - Video (15 secs)
  2. Ventral striatum and Nucleus accumbens
  3. Ventral tegmental area - Video (2 mins)
Learn more about the limbic system

Hormones[edit | edit source]

Ask/discuss:

  1. What is a hormone?
  2. What is a neurotransmitter?
Hormones linked to Wikipedia articles and videos
  1. Cortisol - Video (40 secs)
  2. Testosterone
  3. Oxytocin - Video (2 mins)
  4. Ghrelin
  5. Leptin

Activity
  1. Go to the mix and match spreadsheet:
    Hormones, neurotransmitters and their motivational and emotional function - Mix and match
  2. Allocate your name to one of the hormones research the correct answer. Once finished, select any that are free until the task is complete.
  3. As a group, discuss and review the answers. Then delete the answers and try again. Second time around, group members should select different structures. Aim to complete the exercise at least twice.

Neurotransmitters[edit | edit source]

Neurotransmitters linked to Wikipedia articles and videos
  1. Dopamine - Video (2 mins)
  2. Serotonin - Video (2 mins)
  3. Norepinephrine - Video (2 mins)
  4. Endorphins - Video (2 mins)

Activity
  1. Go to the mix and match spreadsheet:
    Hormones, neurotransmitters and their motivational and emotional function - Mix and match
  2. Allocate your name to one of the neurotransmitters and research the correct answer. Once finished, select any that are free until the task is complete.
  3. As a group, discuss and review the answers. Then delete the answers and try again. Second time around, group members should select different structures. Aim to complete the exercise at least twice.

Wiki editing[edit | edit source]

Images[edit | edit source]

Live demo - ask for a volunteer chapter.

Figure X. An example image with an APA style caption, right justified and 150px in size.
  1. Image search options:
    1. Wikimedia Commons
      1. Search results might include:
        1. A page containing thumbnails of relevant images (e.g., Psychology
        2. A category containing links to sub-categories and thumbnails (e.g., Category:Emotions)
        3. A list of search results with thumbnails (e.g., worried)
      2. Wikimedia Commons can also be searched through the Visual Editor, Insert - Image - enter search text into the File name field.
    2. Google Images Advanced Search with License filtering (free to use, share or modify, even commercially) to identify free to use images (advanced - filter - usage rights)
    3. Creative Commons
  2. Embedding an image
    1. Edit a Wikiversity page and add insert an image using the Visual Editor (Edit - Insert - Media - File name). Adjust the:
      1. Caption
      2. Position
      3. Size
    2. Repeat for a second image
  3. Uploading to Wikimedia Commons
    1. Who is the copyright owner?
    2. What is the copyright license?
    3. If appropriate, upload images to Wiki Commons - how to video

Tables[edit | edit source]

  1. Easiest to use the visual editor
  2. Wikiversity help:Tables
  3. APA style caption

Topic development checklist[edit | edit source]

Have you:

  1. selected a topic?
  2. edited the chapter page?
  3. created a heading structure?
  4. added dot points for each section?
  5. embedded and captioned a relevant image?
  6. added at least one internal links (See also) and at least one external link (External links)?
  7. made at least one social contribution and summarised it on your user page?

For more info, see the topic development author guidelines.

Recording[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

3D Brain structure app
Book chapters
Extra tutorial exercises
Lectures and tutorials
Wikipedia

External links[edit | edit source]