Literature/1949/Orwell

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Authors
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z &

Orwell, George (1949). Nineteen Eighty-Four. London: Secker and Warburg, 1949.

Excerpts[edit]

  • Don't you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it. Every concept that can ever be needed, will be expressed by exactly one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all its subsidiary meanings rubbed out and forgotten.
  • The Ministry of Peace concerns itself with war, the Ministry of Truth with lies, the Ministry of Love with torture, and the Ministry of Plenty with starvation. These contradictions are not accidental, nor do they result from ordinary hypocrisy; they are deliberate exercises in DOUBLETHINK. For it is only by reconciling contradictions that power can be retained indefinitely. In no other way could the ancient cycle be broken. If human equality is to be forever averted--if the High, as we have called them, are to keep their places permanently--then the prevailing mental condition must be controlled insanity.
More...
q: Nineteen Eighty-Four

Wikimedia[edit]

w: Nineteen Eighty-Four
w: George Orwell

Chronology[edit]

Reviews[edit]

  • Google books: "13919 reviews" [1]  KYPark [T] 23:36, 2 October 2011 (UTC)

Comments[edit]


Notes[edit]

Wikiversity-logo-en.svg 1900s ^
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
'20 '21 '22 '23 '24 '25 '26 '27 '28 '29
'30 '31 '32 '33 '34 '35 '36 '37 '38 '39
'40 '41 '42 '43 '44 '45 '46 '47 '48 '49
'50 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59
'60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '67 '68 '69
'70 '71 '72 '73 '74 '75 '76 '77 '78 '79
'80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89
'90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99
2000s
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
Wikiversity-logo-en.svg 1900s category ^
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
'20 '21 '22 '23 '24 '25 '26 '27 '28 '29
'30 '31 '32 '33 '34 '35 '36 '37 '38 '39
'40 '41 '42 '43 '44 '45 '46 '47 '48 '49
'50 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59
'60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '67 '68 '69
'70 '71 '72 '73 '74 '75 '76 '77 '78 '79
'80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89
'90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99
2000s category
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg 1900s works ad hoc
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
'20 '21 '22 '23 '24 '25 '26 '27 '28 '29
'30 '31 '32 '33 '34 '35 '36 '37 '38 '39
'40 '41 '42 '43 '44 '45 '46 '47 '48 '49
'50 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59
'60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '67 '68 '69
'70 '71 '72 '73 '74 '75 '76 '77 '78 '79
'80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89
'90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99
2000s works
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg 1900s books cat. ^
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19
'20 '21 '22 '23 '24 '25 '26 '27 '28 '29
'30 '31 '32 '33 '34 '35 '36 '37 '38 '39
'40 '41 '42 '43 '44 '45 '46 '47 '48 '49
'50 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 '59
'60 '61 '62 '63 '64 '65 '66 '67 '68 '69
'70 '71 '72 '73 '74 '75 '76 '77 '78 '79
'80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '86 '87 '88 '89
'90 '91 '92 '93 '94 '95 '96 '97 '98 '99
2000s books category
'00 '01 '02 '03 '04 '05 '06 '07 '08 '09
'10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16 '17 '18 '19

http://books.google.com/advanced_book_search

Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."