Literature/1926/Russell

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Russell, Bertrand (1926). "The Meaning of Meaning." Dial, vol.81 (August 1926) pp. 114-121.

Reprints[edit]

  • W. Scott Wood (1986). "Bertrand Russell's Review of The Meaning of Meaning," Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, vol. 45, no. 1 (January 1986) pp. 107-113. [1]
  • W. Terrence Gordon, ed. (1994). C. K. Ogden and Linguistics (5 Volumes). London: Routledge/Thoemmes Press. [^] pp. 1-12. [2]

Excerpts[edit]

  • I have not space to deal with the many topics occurring in other parts of The Meaning of Meaning. There are discussions of beauty, of the folly of philosophers, of the wisdom of savages, and a host of subjects more or less cognate to the main theme. [c 1]

Wikimedia[edit]

w: Bertrand Russell
w: The Meaning of Meaning

Chronology[edit]

Reviews[edit]

  • W. Scott Wood (1986). "Bertrand Russell's Review of The Meaning of Meaning," Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, vol. 45, no. 1 (January 1986) pp. 107-113. [3]


Comments[edit]

  1. This closing passage may have made many if not most of Russell's fellow philosophers become angry at the book as (perhaps unjustly) exposing their folly as contrasted with the wisdom of savages, hence as if they had been worse than savages. According to w: General semantics #Criticism,
      Peter Strawson, in a review of Black’s book, commented on the chapter "Korzybski’s General Semantics" that it was "a subject which, to judge from the quotations from Science and Sanity, was hardly worth Professor Black’s attention."
    In his essay "On Referral" (1950) a year ago, Strawson attacked Russell "On Denoting" (1905), who in turn counter-attacked in "Mr Strawson On Referral" (1957).

Notes[edit]

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."