Literature/1975/Putnam

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Putnam, Hilary (1975). Mind, Language and Reality, Philosophical Papers Vol. 2, Cambridge University Press.
  • This page specially has the twin page, Putnam/Hilary/1975, which looks to another, more precise and less concise, way of identifying entries.

Author[edit]

w: Hilary Putnam

Contents[edit]

Introduction
 1  Language and philosophy
 2  The analytic and the synthetic
 3  Do true assertions correspond to reality?
 4  Some issues in the theory of grammar
 5  The 'innateness hypothesis' and 
    explanatory models in linguistics 
 6  How not to talk about meaning
 7  Review of The concept of a person
 8  Is semantics possible?
 9  The refutation of conventionalism
10  Reply to Gerald Massey
11  Explanation and reference
12  The meaning of 'meaning'
13  Language and reality
14  Philosophy and our mental life
15  Dreaming and 'depth grammar'
16  Brains and behavior
17  Other minds
18  Minds and machines
19  Robots: machines or artificially created life?
20  The mental life of some machines 
21  The nature of mental states
22  Logical positivism and the philosophy of mind
Bibliography
Index
vii
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456

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."