Literature/1994/Gordon

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Authors
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z &

W. Terrence Gordon, ed. (1994). C. K. Ogden and Linguistics (5 Volumes). London: Routledge/Thoemmes Press.

General[edit | edit source]

The "whole linguistic problem" which Ogden addressed is a vast range of linguistic features and their use and the inadequacies in existing analyses of language. It was the study of these and related questions which give his work an enduring quality of particular relevance to late twentieth century linguistics.

Contents[edit | edit source]

Volume 2. From Russell to Russo: Reviews and Commentaries
http://books.google.com/books?id=fE8JYH1eBoEC
Introduction W. Terrence Gordon vii
The Meaning of Meaning Bertrand Russell 001
Basic English and its Applications I. A. Richards 013
The New Bentham Michael Oakeshott 037
Adolf Myers 063
Basic English Hugh Walpole 099
Another Approach to the Problem of Meaning John A. Oesterle 117
Whately Carington Whately Carington 155
Some Objections to Ogden and Richards Max Black 213
Essential World English Lancelot Hogben 229
Language Thought and Comprehension W. H. N. Hotopf 261
Ogden and Richards William G. Hardy 329
Semantics John Paul Russo 373

Excerpts[edit | edit source]

Wikimedia[edit | edit source]

w: C. K. Ogden

Chronology[edit | edit source]

Reviews[edit | edit source]

Comments[edit | edit source]


Notes[edit | edit source]

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."