Literature/1980/Schank

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Schank, Roger C.; Janet L. Kolodner & Gerald DeJong (1980). "Conceptual Information Retrieval." Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM conference on research and development in information retrieval (SIGIR '80, Cambridge, England, 1980) Kent, UK: Butterworth, 1981. pp. 94-116.

Authors[edit | edit source]

w: Roger C. Schank
Department of Computer Science, Yale University
w: Janet L. Kolodner
Department of Computer Science, Yale University
Gerald DeJong
Department of Computer Science, Yale University

Abstract[edit | edit source]

If we want to build intelligent information retrieval systems, we will have to give them the capabilities of understanding natural language, automatically organizing and reorganizing their memories, and using intelligent heuristics for searching their memories. These systems will have to analyze and understand both new text and Natural Language queries. In answering questions, they will have to direct memory search to reasonable places. This requires good organization of both the conceptual content of text and knowledge necessary for understanding those texts and accessing memory. The CYRUS and FRUMP systems (Kolodner (1978), Schank and Kolodner (1979), Dejong (1979)) comprise an information retrieval system called CyFr. Together, they have the analysis and retrieval capabilities mentioned above. FRUMP analysis news stories from the UPI wire for their conceptual content, and produces summaries of those stories. It sends summaries of stories about important people to CYRUS automatically adds those stories to its memory, and can then retrieve that information to answer question posed to it in natural language. This paper describes the problems involved in building such an intelligent system. It proposes solutions to some of those problems bases on recent research in Artificial Intelligence and Natural Language processing, and describes the CyFr system, which implements those solutions. The solutions we propose and implement are based on a model of human understanding and memory retrieval. (Author) [1]

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w: Case based reasoning
w: Natural language understanding

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The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

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H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."