Social Victorians/People/Prince Charles of Denmark

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Also Known As[edit | edit source]

  • Family name: Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
  • Christian Frederik Carl Georg Valdemar Axel
  • Prince Charles of Denmark
  • Prince Carl of Denmark (until 1905)
  • King Haakon of Norway (1905–1957)

Demographics[edit | edit source]

  • Nationality: Danish, Norwegian

Residences[edit | edit source]

  • In England, a house on the Sandringham estate.

Family[edit | edit source]

  • Christian Frederik Carl Georg Valdemar Axel (3 August 1872 – 21 September 1957)[1]
  • Maud Charlotte Mary Victoria, Princess Maud of Wales (26 November 1869 – 20 November 1938)[2]

Relations[edit | edit source]

Acquaintances, Friends and Enemies[edit | edit source]

Organizations[edit | edit source]

  • He is from the Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg branch of the ruling family of Denmark.
  • She is a daughter of the Prince and Princess of Wales.

Timeline[edit | edit source]

1896 July 22, Prince Charles of Denmark and Princess Maud of Wales married.

1897 July 3, Prince and Princess Charles of Denmark (Princess Maud of Wales) attended the Duchess of Devonshire's fancy-dress ball at Devonshire House, accompanying the Prince and Princess of Wales.

Costume at the Duchess of Devonshire's 2 July 1897 Fancy-dress Ball[edit | edit source]

Maud of Wales (Princess Charles of Denmark) and Prince Charles of Denmark were attended by

  1. Lady Suffield (at 536)
  2. Miss Knollys
  3. Major-General Ellis

Princess Maud of Wales (Princess Charles of Denmark)[edit | edit source]

At the Duchess of Devonshire's 2 July 1897 fancy-dress ball, Princess Maud of Wales (at 159) — called Princess Charles of Denmark in the newspapers — accompanied the Princess of Wales as one of the ladies of her Court, along with Mary of Teck, Duchess of York, Princess Louise of Wales, Duchess of Fife, Princess Victoria of Wales, and Princess Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein. She sat at Table 5 and

  • wore pink with silver, her favorite colour.[3]:5, Col. 6c
  • accompanied the Princess of Wales as one of the ladies of her Court, along with the Duchess of York, the Duchess of Fife, Princess Victoria of Wales, and Princess Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein.[3]:5, Col. 6
  • was dressed "in pink satin and silver, and Princess Victoria of Wales, in pale yellow crêpe de chine, represented other ladies of the court" of Margaret of Valois.[4]
  • was attended by "in pink and silver ….. All the Princesses wore a profusion of diamonds."[5]
  • "Princess Charles of Denmark wore pink and silver."[6]

Prince Charles of Denmark[edit | edit source]

Prince Charles of Denmark (at 144) accompanied the Prince and Princess of Wales as a gentleman of the Court of Denmark in the time of Elizabeth. He sat at Table 3 and had "sought the aid of Alias," the costumier.[7]:41, Col. 1a He

  • "was a gentleman of the Court of Denmark, about the same period (Elizabethan); pourpoint, trunks and mantle of black satin, richly embroidered mauve, and studded black jet; high boots, turned back with deep red; toque of black velvet and grey feather."[7]:41, Col. 1b
  • "wore purple brocade doublet and trunks, the latter slashed with mauve satin, as a gentleman of the Court of Denmark in the 18th century."[3]:5, Col. 6a
  • "went as a gentleman of the Court of Denmark in the time of Elizabeth, wearing an embroidered purple velvet doublet, with reddish purple velvet mantle and a black velvet toque with white plumes."[8]:5, Col. 9c
  • was a "Gentleman of the Court of Denmark."[9]

Questions and Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Princess Maud was the youngest daughter of Edward Albert, Prince of Wales, and Alexandra, Princess of Wales.
  2. Prince Charles of Denmark became King Haakon VII of Norway, and Princess Maud of Wales Queen of Norway. Søren Pilmark played the role of the old King Haakon VII (Prince Charles or Carl of Denmark) in the tv series Atlantic Crossing.

Footnotes[edit | edit source]

  1. "Haakon VII of Norway". Wikipedia. 2020-11-04. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Haakon_VII_of_Norway&oldid=986997999. 
  2. "Maud of Wales". Wikipedia. 2020-09-11. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Maud_of_Wales&oldid=977873537. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Duchess of Devonshire's Fancy Ball. A Brilliant Spectacle. Some of the Dresses." London Daily News Saturday 3 July 1897: 5 [of 10], Col. 6a–6, Col. 1b. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000051/18970703/024/0005 and https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000051/18970703/024/0006.
  4. “The Devonshire House Ball. A Brilliant Gathering.” The Pall Mall Gazette 3 July 1897, Saturday: 7 [of 10], Col. 2a–3a. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000098/18970703/019/0007.
  5. “The Devonshire House Ball.” The Man of Ross 10 July 1897, Saturday: 2 [of 8], Col. 4b. British Newspaper Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0001463/18970710/033/0002.
  6. “The Duchess’s Costume Ball.” Westminster Gazette 03 July 1897 Saturday: 5 [of 8], Cols. 1a–3b [of 3]. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002947/18970703/035/0005.
  7. 7.0 7.1 “The Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball.” The Gentlewoman 10 July 1897 Saturday: 32–42 [of 76], Cols. 1a–3c [of 3]. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0003340/18970710/155/0032.
  8. "The Duchess of Devonshire's Fancy Dress Ball. Special Telegram." Belfast News-Letter Saturday 03 July 1897: 5 [of 8], Col. 9c [of 9]–6, Col. 1a. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000038/18970703/015/0005.
  9. "Ball at Devonshire House." The Times Saturday 3 July 1897: 12, Cols. 1a–4c The Times Digital Archive. Web. 28 Nov. 2015.