Social Victorians/People/Pless

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Also Known As[edit | edit source]

Daisy, Princess of Pless[edit | edit source]

  • Family name: Cornwallis-West
  • Daisy, Princess of Pless
  • Princess Henry of Pless

Prince Henry of Pless[edit | edit source]

  • Family name: Hochberg[1]
  • Prince Henry of Pless
  • Hans Heinrich XV Prinz von Pless
  • Count of Hochberg
  • Baron of Fürstenstein
  • Heinrich, Prince of Pless: VIAF: 301773884


Demographics[edit | edit source]

  • Nationality: Daisy, British, born in Wales; Henreich, Silesian, from what is now Poland

Family[edit | edit source]

  • Daisy (Mary Theresa) Cornwallis-West, then Daisy, Princess of Pless or Princess Henry of Pless (28 June 1873 — 29 June 1943)[2]
  • Hans Heinrich XV Prinz von Pless (23 April 1861 — 3 February 1938)
  1. Daughter (25 February 1893 – 11 March 1893)
  2. Hans Heinrich XVII Wilhelm Albert Eduard 4th Fürst von Pless (2 February 1900 – 26 January 1984)
  3. Alexander Friedrich Wilhelm Georg Konrad Ernst Maximilian 5th Fürst von Pless (1 February 1905 – 22 November 1984)
  4. Bolko Conrad Friedrich von Pless Graf von Hochberg (23 September 1910 – 22 June 1936)

Acquaintances, Friends and Enemies[edit | edit source]

Friends[edit | edit source]

Timeline[edit | edit source]

1891 December 8, Daisy Cornwallis-West and Hans Heinrich, XV Prince of Pless, married in St. Margaret's in Westminster, with Edward Albert, Prince of Wales, as witness.[2]

1897 July 2, Daisy, Princess of Pless and Prince Henry of Pless attended the Duchess of Devonshire's fancy-dress ball at Devonshire House.[4]

1922 December 12, Daisy Cornwallis-West, Princess of Pless and Hans Heinrich, XV Prince of Pless divorced.[2]

Costume at the Duchess of Devonshire's 2 July 1897 Fancy-dress Ball[edit | edit source]

Daisy, Princess Henry of Pless[edit | edit source]

At the Duchess of Devonshire's fancy-dress ball, Daisy, Princess Henry of Pless (at 38), sat at Table 5. She was dressed as the Queen of Sheba and walked in the "Oriental" procession, at the beginning, as the Queen of Sheba (right after Lady Cynthia Graham).[5][6]:7, Col. 5b

  • She was dressed in "gold and purple gauze, the short-waisted bodice encrusted with immense turquoises set round with diamonds and other precious stones; the skirt and draperies of gold gauze embroidered to correspond, and the long gold girdle was encrusted and fringed with jewels; bird of paradise and crown. Four negroes held her train."[5]:7, Col. 7b
  • She was dressed in "gold and purple gauze, the short-waisted bodice encrusted with immense turquoises set round with diamonds and other precious stones; the skirt and draperies of gold gauze embroidered to correspond, and the long gold girdle encrusted and fringed with jewels. Bird of paradise and crown. Four niggers [sic] held her train."[6]
  • She was dressed "as Queen of Sheba with her train."[5]:7, Col. 4c
  • She was dressed "as Queen of Sheba, [and] wore diaphonous draperies of purple and gold gauze, with barbaric splendour of heavy jewellery."[7]:5, Col. 7c
  • "Among the most magnificent of the Oriental personages was Princess Henry Pless, who, as the Queen of Sheba, was gorgeous to behold. Her dress was of purple and gold-shot gauze, bodice and skirt embroidered nearly to the knees, the train being one mass of jewels encrusted in gold. An Assyrian headdress, with clusters of diamonds over each ear, jewelled feathers, and chains of diamonds and turquoises, which were attached to armlets from shoulder to wrist, completed a costume of dazzling splendour."[8]:32, Col. 2c
  • "Princess Henry of Pless was splendidly dressed as the Queen of Sheba in gold gauze shot with maize [sic, s/b mauve?], and with a soft white sash tied across the waist. The whole robe was encrusted with lovely jewels, and the head-dress was composed of a diamond peahen, white paradise plumes, and chains of diamonds falling at each side."[9]:5, Col. 9c (This description of Daisy, Princess Henry of Pless's costume in the Belfast News-Letter is almost identical to the one in the Carlisle Patriot through the description of the robe but not the headdress.[10])
  • "As the Queen of Sheba, Princess Henry of Pless was attended by five black pages and five white, in gorgeous dresses, who carried her train. Her dress was of purple and gold shot gauze."[11]
  • "the Queen of Sheba was delightfully impersonated by Princess Henry of Pless, in robes of gold tissue shot with purple, and bordered with a wonderful jewelled embroidery, in which turquoises, amethysts, rubies, and diamonds were effectively intermingled."[12]
  • "gold and purple gauze, the short-waisted bodice encrusted with immense turquoises set round with diamonds and other precious stones; the skirt and draperies of gold gauze embroidered to correspond, and the long gold girdle encrusted and fringed with jewels. Bird of paradise and crown."[13]
  • "Princess Henry of Pless as the Queen of Sheba was also [like Louisa Duchess of Devonshire?] attended by black pages, trainbearers, &c., and her procession was the most dazzling of all."[14]
  • "The Princess Henry of Pless was a dream in purple and gold and diamonds."[14]:Col. 2

She had attendants, perhaps 5 white and 5 black pages; also, her sister, Miss Cornwallis West, Shelagh Cornwallis-West, was her "Ethiopian attendant."[7]:5, Col. 7c

Lafayette's portrait of "Mary Theresa Olivia ('Daisy') (née Cornwallis-West), Princess of Pless as Cleopatra" in costume is #85 in the album presented to the Duchess of Devonshire and now in the National Portrait Gallery.[15] The printing on the portrait says, "H. H. Princess Henry of Pless as Cleopatra," with a Long S in Princess and Pless.[16]

Prince Henry of Pless[edit | edit source]

Prince Henry of Pless was present, but his name is not listed among those in the first seating for supper. Prince Henry of Pless (at 40) was dressed as

  • "Beside [Lady Raincliffe, as the Empress Catherine] was Prince Orloff, represented by Prince Henry Pless, in a costume of red cloth with heavy gold embroideries; he also wore the Order of St. Catherine."[8]:32, Col. 3b
  • "Prince Orloff (Court of Catherine of Russia). Scarlet cloth coat embroidered in gold, with vest worked to correspond; white breeches and jewelled decorations."[5]:7, Col. 7b
  • H.S.H. Prince Henry of Pless "personated Prince Orloff, of the Court of Catherine of Russia. His scarlet coat and white vest were embroidered in gold, and he wore diamond jewels and orders."[7]:5, Col. 7c
  • "Prince Henry of Pless, as Count Orloff, the favourite of Catherine of Russia, was imposing in scarlet and gold."[9]:5, Col. 9c

He is not listed among those in the first seating for supper, although the Princess of Pless was, so he probably was? He walked in the Court in the procession of Empress Catherine II of Russia as Count Orloff.[5] (7, Col. 5b).[6] Prince Henry of Pless's original costume appeared in the Drury Lane production of The White Heather.[17]

Questions and Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Notice her attendants and the variation in how they are described; the Times uses the n-word.
  2. Daisy Cornwallis-West, Princess Henry of Pless, is described as being dressed as Cleopatra in the Album of portraits and as the Queen of Sheba in other reports.
  3. Daisy Cornwallis-West's mother, Patsy Cornwallis-West, was one of Bertie's mistresses ( Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, King Edward VII).

Footnotes[edit | edit source]

  1. "Hans Heinrich XV Prinz von Pless." "Person Page". www.thepeerage.com. Retrieved 2020-10-05.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Mary Theresa Cornwallis-West." "Person Page". www.thepeerage.com. Retrieved 2020-10-05.
  3. "Hans Heinrich XV von Hochberg". Wikipedia. 2020-09-30. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hans_Heinrich_XV_von_Hochberg&oldid=981092541. 
  4. "Daisy, Princess of Pless". Wikipedia. 2020-08-10. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Daisy,_Princess_of_Pless&oldid=972068300. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 "Fancy Dress Ball at Devonshire House." Morning Post Saturday 3 July 1897: 7 [of 12], Col. 4a–8 Col. 2b. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000174/18970703/054/0007.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 "Ball at Devonshire House." The Times Saturday 3 July 1897: 12, Cols. 1a–4c The Times Digital Archive. Web. 28 Nov. 2015.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 "Duchess of Devonshire's Fancy Ball. A Brilliant Spectacle. Some of the Dresses." London Daily News Saturday 3 July 1897: 5 [of 10], Col. 6a–6, Col. 1b. British Newspaper Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000051/18970703/024/0005 and http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000051/18970703/024/0006.
  8. 8.0 8.1 “The Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball.” The Gentlewoman 10 July 1897 Saturday: 32–42 [of 76], Cols. 1a–3c [of 3]. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0003340/18970710/155/0032.
  9. 9.0 9.1 "The Duchess of Devonshire's Fancy Dress Ball. Special Telegram." Belfast News-Letter Saturday 03 July 1897: 5 [of 8], Col. 9 [of 9]. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/BL/0000038/18970703/015/0005.
  10. "Fancy Dress Ball: Unparalleled Splendour." Carlisle Patriot Friday 9 July 1897: 7 [of 8], Col. 4a–b. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000365/18970709/084/0007.
  11. "Duchess of Devonshire's Fancy-Dress Ball. Brilliant Spectacle." The [Guernsey] Star 6 July 1897, Tuesday: 1 [of 4], Col. 1–2. British Newspaper Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000184/18970706/003/0001.
  12. “The Devonshire House Ball. A Brilliant Gathering.” The Pall Mall Gazette 3 July 1897, Saturday: 7 [of 10], Col. 2a–3a. British Newspaper Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000098/18970703/019/0007.
  13. Greville, Violet, Lady. "Devonshire House Ball." The Graphic Saturday 10 July 1897: 15 [of 24]: Col. 1a–16, Col. 1c. British Newspaper Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000057/18970710/019/0015.
  14. 14.0 14.1 “The Duchess’s Costume Ball.” Westminster Gazette 03 July 1897 Saturday: 5 [of 8], Cols. 1a–3b [of 3]. British Newspaper Archive https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0002947/18970703/035/0005.
  15. "Devonshire House Fancy Dress Ball (1897): photogravures by Walker & Boutall after various photographers." 1899. National Portrait Gallery https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait-list.php?set=515 (accessed June 2019).
  16. "Mary Theresa Olivia ('Daisy') (née Cornwallis-West), Princess of Pless as Cleopatra." Diamond Jubilee Fancy Dress Ball. National Portrait Gallery https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw158443/Mary-Theresa-Olivia-Daisy-ne-Cornwallis-West-Princess-of-Pless-as-Cleopatra (accessed June 2019).
  17. "The Morning’s News." London Daily News 18 September 1897, Saturday: 5 [of 8], Col. 2b. British Newspaper Archive http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000051/18970918/027/0005.