Literature/1999/Goldenfeld

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Goldenfeld, Nigel & Kadanoff, Leo P. (1999). "Simple Lessons from Complexity," Science 284 (Apr 2, 1999): 87-89.

Authors[edit]

Goldenfeld, Nigel
w: Leo P. Kadanoff

Abstract[edit]

The complexity of the world is contrasted with the simplicity of the basic laws of physics. In recent years, considerable study has been devoted to systems which exhibit complex outcomes. This experience has not given us any new laws of physics, but instead has given us a set of lessons about appropriate ways of approaching complex systems.

Excerpts[edit]

  • Nature can produce complex structures, even in simple situations, and some simple laws, even in complex situations.
  • Use the right level of description to catch the phenomena of interest. Don't model bulldozers with quarks.
  • So every good model starts from a question. The modeler should aways pick the right level of detail to answer the question.

Wikimedia[edit]

w: Complex systems

Chronology[edit]

  • Colander, D. (2000). The Complexity Vision and the Teaching of Economics. E. Elgar, Northampton, Massachusetts.
  • Goldenfeld, Nigel & Kadanoff, Leo P. (1999). "Simple Lessons from Complexity," Science 284 (Apr 2, 1999): 87-89. [^]
  • Cilliers, P. (1998). Complexity and Postmodernism: Understanding Complex Systems. London: Routledge.
  • Prigogine, I. (1997). The End of Certainty, New York: The Free Press.
  • Bak, Per (1996). How Nature Works: The Science of Self-Organized Criticality. New York: Copernicus.
  • Bale, L.S. (1995). Gregory Bateson, Cybernetics and the Social/Behavioral Sciences. http://www.narberthpa.com/Bale/lsbale_dop/cybernet.htm
  • Kauffman, Stuart A. (1995). At Home in the Universe. Oxford University Press.
  • Kauffman, Stuart A. (1993). The Origin of Order. Oxford University Press,
  • Hayek, Friedrich (1978), "The Results of Human Action but Not of Human Design," in: New Studies in Philosophy, Politics, Economics, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 96-105.
  • Nicolis, G. & I. Prigogine (1977). Self-Organization in Nonequilibrium Systems. New York: John Wiley.
  • Lorenz, Edward Norton (1972). "Predictability: Does the Flap of a Butterfly's Wings in Brazil Set Off a Tornado in Texas?" Address at the 139th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Sheraton Park Hotel, Boston, Mass., December 29, 1972. [^]
  • Lorenz, Edward Norton (1963). "Deterministic Nonperiodic Flow". Journal of Atmospheric Sciences 20(2): 130-141. [^]

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Gradient-optical-illusion.svg
The shade of the bar looks invariant in isolation but variant in context, in (favor of) sharp contrast with the color gradient background, hence an innate illusion we have to reasonably interpret and overcome as well as the mirage. Such variance appearing seasonably from context to context may not only be the case with our vision but worldview in general in practice indeed, whether a priori or a posteriori. Perhaps no worldview from nowhere, without any point of view or prejudice at all!

Ogden & Richards (1923) said, "All experience ... is either enjoyed or interpreted ... or both, and very little of it escapes some degree of interpretation."

H. G. Wells (1938) said, "The human individual is born now to live in a society for which his fundamental instincts are altogether inadequate."