Rainwater harvesting

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Ancient Rainwater Harvesting Well, Vrindavan

Rain water harvesting (RWH) is a technique of collection and storage of rainwater into natural reservoirs or tanks, or the infiltration of surface water into subsurface aquifers (before it is lost as surface runoff). One method of rainwater harvesting is rooftop harvesting. With rooftop harvesting, most any surface — tiles, metal sheets, plastics, but not grass or palm leaf — can be used to intercept the flow of rainwater and provide a household with high-quality drinking water and year-round storage. Other uses include water for gardens, livestock, and irrigation, etc.

The reasons for using rainwater harvesting systems answer three questions:

What: Rainwater harvesting will improve water supply, food production, and ultimately food security.

Who: Water insecure households or individuals in rural areas will benefit the most from rainwater harvesting systems.

How: Since rainwater harvesting leads to water supply which leads to food security, this will greatly contribute to income generation.


Rainwater Harvesting TOOLS - simple methods applicable to project planning
Greywater treatment system in school.jpg
New Destiny Tailoring Project.jpg
Dew water from metal roofs.jpg
Rainwater harvesting in Burkina Faso (2957138015).jpg
3R (Recharge,
Retention & Reuse)
Business Development -
Micro-financing
Multiple Use
Services (MUS)
SamSam
RWH Tool
Dew water from metal roofs.jpg
Africa Precipitation Map cropped.svg.png
Field Trip- water sampling.jpg
Rain is Gain Tool
Rainwater Harvesting
GIS Map
WASH Environmental
Sustainability Assessment


Rainwater Harvesting TECHNOLOGIES - technical construction details, costs, and applicability
Ceres rainwater tank 1 Pengo2.jpg
Rijstvelden Myanmar 2006.jpg
Shipot.jpg
Tourbière 03 - Parc de Frontenac - Juillet 2008.jpg
Bush in fog.jpg
Rooftop
In situ
Surface water
Groundwater
recharge
Fog and dew


RWH INNOVATIONS - approaches, technologies, applications and projects on 3R, MUS and sustainable financing
Dailekh Gate.JPG
Beautiful scene of Salyan district.jpg
COLLECTIE TROPENMUSEUM Groepsportret van een Masai vrouw met drie kinderen bij Kajiado TMnr 20014283.jpg
Batwa Uganda.jpg
Uganda field trials2 lo.jpg
Salyan and Dailekh,
Nepal
Salyan District,
Nepal
Kajiado, Kenya -
3R and MUS
Rwambu, Uganda -
Clearwater Revival
Rwambu
Uganda Hills


Example rainwater harvesting in India[edit]

Vismaya rainwater harvesting

Tamil Nadu is the first Indian state to make rainwater harvesting mandatory. On 30 May 2014, the state government announced that it will set up 50,000 rainwater harvesting structures at various parts of the capital city of Chennai. [1]

Around 4,000 temples in Tamil Nadu state traditionally had water tanks that were used for various rituals. The tanks also served as natural aquifers and helped recharge groundwater. Over the years, however, many of these tanks have gone out of use. Overflowing mounds of silt and garbage have replaced the water in them.

Now, following sustained campaigns by voluntary organisations and departments in charge of water distribution and use, authorities in Chennai have decided to restore around 40 major temple tanks in the city. The aim is to convert the tanks into catchments for rainwater harvesting. [2]

Rainwater harvesting links[edit]

Rainwater harvesting and hand washing system are combined. The tank is secured with the steel bracket to protect from theft or misuse.

Field experiences[edit]

Rainwater collector. © Copyright Jonathan Wilkins and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons License.

The following projects utilize rainwater harvesting techniques, as seen on the Akvo Really Simple Reporting (RSR) pages.

Community Exchange - Rainwater Harvesting[edit]

Here are conversations about rainwater harvesting (RWH) including best practices, troubleshooting, and advice about tanks and systems. Sourced from the Dgroups website, which is a free member-only forum, where people can ask a pool of over 3,000 members about rainwater harvesting. You can always become a member on their site for greater involvement, if you have questions you need to know for your RWH project. Go to the Community Exchange.

Acknowledgements[edit]