Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Selected quizzes

Beta particle astronomy quiz

Beta particles are produced by X-rays passing through air. Credit: Unknown.

Beta-particles astronomy is a lecture from the radiation astronomy department that is included in the course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on beta-particles astronomy at any time.

To improve your score, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{radiation astronomy resources}} and {{principles of radiation astronomy}} templates. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Blue astronomy quiz

This is a detailed, photo-like view of Earth based largely on observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. Credit: Robert Simmon and Marit Jentoft-Nilsen, NASA.

Blue astronomy is a lecture from the radiation astronomy department for the course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on blue astronomy at any time.

To improve your scores, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{principles of radiation astronomy}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Radiation astrochemistry quiz

This is a natural color image of Titan. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.

Radiation chemistry, or astronomical radiation chemistry, is a lecture for the course principles of radiation astronomy about the abundance and reactions of chemical elements and molecules in the universe.

You are free to take this quiz at any time and as many times as you wish to improve your score.

Once you’ve read and studied the lecture, the links contained within, and listed under See also, External links and those in the {{principles of radiation astronomy}} template, you should have adequate background to get 100 %.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Color astronomy quiz

Gases above Io's surface produced a ghostly glow that could be seen at visible wavelengths (red, green, and violet). Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.

Color astronomy is a lecture as part of the radiation astronomy department course development of principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on color astronomy at any time.

To improve your scores, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, and listed under See also, External links and the {{radiation astronomy resources}} and {{principles of radiation astronomy}} templates. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

This quiz may need up to an hour to take and is equivalent to an hourly.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Cosmic ray astronomy quiz

The cosmic-ray telescope collects data on the composition of the cosmic ray particles and their energy ranges. Credit: NASA.

Cosmic-ray astronomy is a lecture as part of the radiation astronomy course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on cosmic-ray astronomy at any time.

To improve your score, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{principles of radiation astronomy}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Cyan astronomy quiz

The visual image shows the natural cyan color of planetary nebula NGC 7048. Credit: Aladin from CDS.

Cyan astronomy is a lecture as part of the radiation astronomy department course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on cyan astronomy at any time.

To improve your score, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links and in the {{principles of radiation astronomy}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Radiation detector astronomy quiz

This is an animation of a radiation scintillation counter. Credit: KieranMaher.

Radiation astronomy detectors is a lecture as part of the radiation astronomy department course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on radiation astronomy detectors at any time.

To improve your score, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{principles of radiation astronomy}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

This quiz may need up to an hour to take and is equivalent to an hourly.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Electromagnetic radiation astronomy quiz

A new image from all three of NASA's Great Observatories--Chandra, Hubble, and Spitzer--has been created of the star-forming region 30 Doradus, also known as the Tarantula Nebula. Credit: NASA.

Electromagnetic astronomy is a lecture from the radiation astronomy department.

This is a quiz based on the lecture that you are free to take at any time or knowledge level.

Once you’ve read and studied the lecture itself, the links contained within the article and lecture, listed under See also and External links, you should have adequate background to take the quiz and score highly. The templates {{radiation astronomy resources}} and {{principles of radiation astronomy}} may also be helpful.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Electron astronomy quiz

The composite shows upper atmospheric lightning and electrical discharge phenomena. Credit: Abestrobi.

Electron astronomy is a lecture as part of the radiation astronomy course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on electron astronomy at any time.

To improve your score, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{principles of radiation astronomy}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Empirical radiation astronomy quiz

This is a volcanic bomb found in the Mojave Desert National Preserve by Rob McConnell. Credit: Wilson44691.

Empirical radiation astronomy is a lecture about an approach to understanding radiation astronomy phenomena. It is an adjunct lecture for the radiation astronomy department course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on empirical radiation astronomy at any time.

To improve your score, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{radiation astronomy resources}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

As a "learning by doing" resource, this quiz helps you to assess your knowledge and understanding of the information, and it is a quiz you may take over and over as a learning resource to improve your knowledge, understanding, test-taking skills, and your score.

Suggestion: Have the lecture available in a separate window.

To master the information and use only your memory while taking the quiz, try rewriting the information from more familiar points of view, or be creative with association.

Enjoy learning by doing!




Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/11



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/12



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/13



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/14



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/15



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/16



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/17



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/18



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/19



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/20



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/21



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/22



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/23



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/24



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/25



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/26



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/27



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/28



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/29



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/30



Portal:Radiation astronomy/Quiz/31



Nominating or creating selected quizzes

If you have a suggestion for future Selected quizzes for this portal, please suggest them on the discussion page, or create them yourself. You can also suggest future Selected quizzes at Portal talk:Radiation astronomy/Quiz. If you have any questions, contact User:Marshallsumter or leave a message at Radiation astronomy.