Brexit

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BREXIT LEARNING PROJECT

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Welcome to the Brexit Learning Project. The word Brexit refers to the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union.[1] Following the 2016 referendum vote to leave, the UK started the withdrawal process on 29 March 2017, putting the UK on course to leave by April 2019.[2]

Etymology

Brexit (and the earlier variant, Brixit)[3] is a portmanteau of "British" and "exit". It was derived from Grexit, a hypothetical Greek withdrawal from the Eurozone (and possibly the EU).[4]

The terms of withdrawal have not yet been negotiated and the UK remains a full member of the European Union.[5] Theresa May has announced 12 negotiating objectives and confirmed that the UK Government would not seek permanent single market membership.[6] She has proposed a Great Repeal Bill to repeal the European Communities Act 1972 and incorporate existing EU laws directly into UK law.[7]


Blue question mark icon.svg When you have read the resources listed below, test yourself on the Quiz.

Negotiation objectives[6]

  1. Certainty
  2. Control of "our laws"
  3. Strengthen the Union
  4. Maintain the Common Travel Area with Ireland
  5. Control of immigration
  6. Rights for EU nationals in Britain, and British nationals in the EU
  7. Protect workers’ rights
  8. Free trade with European markets
  9. New trade agreements with other countries
  10. The best place for science and innovation
  11. Co-operation in the fight against crime and terrorism
  12. A smooth, orderly Brexit

Blue question mark icon.svg Do you think these objectives are clear enough and sufficient for negotiation?

Learning resources

  1. Brexit/Background
  2. Brexit/Bibliography
  3. Brexit/Consequences
  4. Brexit/Great Repeal Bill
  5. Brexit/Legislation
  6. Brexit/Procedure
  7. Brexit/Quiz
  8. Brexit/Summary

Notes

  1. Hunt, A. and Wheeler, B. (3 November 2016). "Brexit: All you need to know about the UK leaving the EU". BBC.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. "Article 50: Theresa May to trigger Brexit process". BBC. 20 March 2017.
  3. "Britain and the EU: A Brixit looms". The Economist. 21 June 2012.
  4. Hjelmgaard, K. and Onyanga-Omara, J. (22 February 2016). "Explainer: The what, when and why of 'Brexit'". USA Today.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. "Advice for British nationals travelling and living in Europe". Government of the United Kingdom. 19 January 2017.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "The government's negotiating objectives for exiting the EU: PM speech". Government of the United Kingdom. 17 January 2017.
  7. "Brexit: PM to trigger Article 50 by end of March". BBC. 2 October 2016.