Wright State University Lake Campus/2016-6/moc

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This moc course contains a small study guide with only 36 questions, taken from 5 wikiquizzes. Only two tests, with 5 questions each randomly select from the study guide in a way that is transparent to the reader. Once the software is set up, a new randomized set of exams can be constructed in a few minutes.

Wikisyllabus[edit]

The first fraction indicates how many questions from each practice quiz will be on the test. For example, the second line for Test 1 (2/9) indicates that this test will contain 2 questions from the 9 questions listed in the quiz called AstroApparentRetroMotion. The numbers 1284510 represent permalinks to the quiz on Wikiversity and serve two purposes: (1) they allow students to study online, and (2) they satisfy the collective commons copyright license by leading to the authors of the quizzes.

Test 1[edit]

1/4 from 1282320 to c24ElectromagneticWaves_displacementCurrent
2/9 from 1284510 to AstroApparentRetroMotion
1/7 from 1293955 to AstroGalileanMoons

Test 2[edit]

1/9 from 1284510 to AstroApparentRetroMotion
2/48 from 1284517 to AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB
2/4 from 1378627 to c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry

Studyguide[edit]

If the internet is not available, students can use a studyguide that can be printed out in pdf form. The last page of that studyguide indicates which questions in the bank appear on each test.

Sample exams[edit]

Exams cannot be posted on Wikiversity, but must be requested by instructors. In the sample shown below, two versions were selected for use in proctored classroom.

Wikiskeleton[edit]

Wikiseleton is a debugging tool that permits developers to investigate the software that writes the exams and studyguides. Each set of exams is unique and is identified the code moc20160705T105613

moc20160705T105613
*ntest=1: S_G
{<!--c24ElectromagneticWaves_displacementCurrent_1-->A circlular capactitor of radius  4.2 m has a gap of 8 mm, and a charge of 45 μC.  What is the electric field between the plates?}
{<!--c24ElectromagneticWaves_displacementCurrent_2-->A circlular capactitor of radius  3.2 m has a gap of 13 mm, and a charge of 49 μC.  Compute the surface integral  <math>c^{-2}\oint\vec E\cdot d\vec A</math> over an inner face of the capacitor.}
{<!--c24ElectromagneticWaves_displacementCurrent_3-->A circlular capactitor of radius  4.9 m has a gap of 17 mm, and a charge of 54 μC.  The capacitor is discharged through a  9 kΩ resistor.  What is the decay time? }
{<!--c24ElectromagneticWaves_displacementCurrent_4-->A circlular capactitor of radius  3.3 m has a gap of 12 mm, and a charge of 93 μC.  The capacitor is discharged through a  9 kΩ resistor.  What is what is the maximum magnetic field at the edge of the capacitor? (There are two ways to do this; you should know both.)}
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_1--> ____ motion is in the usual direction, and _______ is motion that has temporarily reversed itself. }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_2--> Under what conditions would a planet not seem to rise in the east and set in the west? }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_3--> When the faster moving Earth overtakes a slower planet outside Earth's orbit}
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_4--> Which planet spends more days in a given retrograde? }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_5--> Which planet has more days between two consecutive retrogrades? }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_6--> A planet that is very, very far from the Sun would be in retrograde for approximately ___ months.}
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_7--> If a planet that is very, very far from the Sun begins a retrograde, how many months must pass before it begins the next retrograde?  }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_8--> ''Planet'' comes from the Greek word for 'wanderer'. }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_9--> We know that Galileo saw Neptune, but is not credited with its discovery because}
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_1-->How does the density of a Galilean moon depend on its distance from Jupiter?  }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_2-->How does the mass of a Galilean moon depend on its distance from the central body?  }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_3-->Does Jupiter's moon Io have craters?   }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_4-->The mechanism that heats the cores of the Galilean moons is   }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_5-->Immediately after publication of Newton's laws of physics (Principia), it was possible to "calculate" the mass of Jupiter.  What important caveat applied to this calculation?   }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_6-->Ganymede, Europa, and Io have ratios in __________ that are 1:2:4. }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_7-->Which of Jupiter's moons has an anhydrous core? }
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_40-->At 3pm a waxing crescent moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_47-->At 9pm a full moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_1-->At 6am a waning crescent moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_49-->At 3pm a full moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_52-->At 3am a waxing gibbous moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_56-->At 3pm a waning gibbous moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_24-->At 3pm a new moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_41-->At 9am a new moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_10-->At 3pm a third quarter moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_20-->At 3am a waning gibbous moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_4-->At 9am a 1st quarter moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_62-->At 3am a third quarter moon would be} 
{<!--c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry_1-->H is defined by, B=μ<sub>0</sub>H, where B is magnetic field. A current of 48A passes along the z-axis.  Use symmetry to find the integral, <math>\int \vec H\cdot\vec{d\ell}</math>, from the point {{nowrap begin}}(0,6.7){{nowrap end}} to the point {{nowrap begin}}(6.7,0){{nowrap end}}.}
{<!--c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry_2-->H is defined by, B=μ<sub>0</sub>H, where B is magnetic field. A current of 67A passes along the z-axis.  Use symmetry to find the integral, <math>\int \vec H\cdot\vec{d\ell}</math>, from the point {{nowrap begin}}(<big>-</big>6.1, 6.1){{nowrap end}} to the point {{nowrap begin}}(6.1, 6.1){{nowrap end}}.}
{<!--c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry_3-->H is defined by, B=μ<sub>0</sub>H, where B is magnetic field. A current of 84A passes along the z-axis.  Use symmetry to find the integral, <math>\int \vec H\cdot\vec{d\ell}</math>, from the point {{nowrap begin}}(0,9.3){{nowrap end}} to the point {{nowrap begin}}(9.3,9.3){{nowrap end}}.}
{<!--c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry_4-->H is defined by, B=μ<sub>0</sub>H, where B is magnetic field. A current of 81A passes along the z-axis.  Use symmetry to find the integral, <math>\int \vec H\cdot\vec{d\ell}</math>, from  {{nowrap begin}}(<big>-∞</big>,6.4){{nowrap end}} to {{nowrap begin}}(+<big>∞</big>,6.4){{nowrap end}}.}
*ntest=2: T1
{<!--c24ElectromagneticWaves_displacementCurrent_4-->A circlular capactitor of radius  3.3 m has a gap of 12 mm, and a charge of 93 μC.  The capacitor is discharged through a  9 kΩ resistor.  What is what is the maximum magnetic field at the edge of the capacitor? (There are two ways to do this; you should know both.)}
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_4--> Which planet spends more days in a given retrograde? }
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_1--> ____ motion is in the usual direction, and _______ is motion that has temporarily reversed itself. }
{<!--AstroGalileanMoons_6-->Ganymede, Europa, and Io have ratios in __________ that are 1:2:4. }
*ntest=3: T2
{<!--AstroApparentRetroMotion_1--> ____ motion is in the usual direction, and _______ is motion that has temporarily reversed itself. }
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_8-->At 6am a waxing gibbous moon would be} 
{<!--AstroLunarphasesAdvancedB_52-->At 3am a waxing gibbous moon would be} 
{<!--c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry_1-->H is defined by, B=μ<sub>0</sub>H, where B is magnetic field. A current of 48A passes along the z-axis.  Use symmetry to find the integral, <math>\int \vec H\cdot\vec{d\ell}</math>, from the point {{nowrap begin}}(0,6.7){{nowrap end}} to the point {{nowrap begin}}(6.7,0){{nowrap end}}.}
{<!--c22Magnetism_ampereLawSymmetry_3-->H is defined by, B=μ<sub>0</sub>H, where B is magnetic field. A current of 84A passes along the z-axis.  Use symmetry to find the integral, <math>\int \vec H\cdot\vec{d\ell}</math>, from the point {{nowrap begin}}(0,9.3){{nowrap end}} to the point {{nowrap begin}}(9.3,9.3){{nowrap end}}.}
|}