Template:Film School:Storyboarding:Pop Quiz:Answers4

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Answers to the Pop Quiz on thumbnail storyboarding (continued more).



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png

Tbe878 says,

Question #1
I would start out with frame #8, which would set the location and time of the scene. It also establishes who is there and what they are doing.


Question #2
Once the dialog starts, I'd switch to frame #3. This lets us see the characters and the film, and while the focus is on the Young Person, the camera is angled so that the Old Person appears to be taller. - 4 points (16 February 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 13.png

Anthony519 says,

Question #1
I think the first frame for this movie would be frame 8 because it shows both characters and the actual point of the movie, which is the movie poster.


Question #2
My second shot for this movie would be frame 13 because since the younger person is the first one to talk, you would want to focus on him/her and the younger person in the frame is looking at the older person signaling that he/she is about to talk. - 4 points (19 February 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 10.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

Vikramshastri says,

The first shot would be Image # 10...
Reason - The audience will see movie poster clearly....


The second shot would be Image # 8...
Reason - The characters are introduced here.... The audience will know that both characters are looking at the poster of Star Wars movie. The camera angle of both the images is same... So zoom out effect can be used here... - 4 points (1 March 2008)
Alternatively,
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 13.png

Vikramshastri says,

The first shot could be Image # 8...
Reason - The characters are introduced here.... The audience will know that both characters are looking at the poster of Star Wars movie.


The second shot would be Image # 13...
Reason - The young person is about to start a conversation with the old person.....




SBTDS OpeningBlankQ.jpg
SBTDS OpeningBlankQ.jpg

Xvat0x says,

Question #1
My first frame would be from across the street, showing the backs of the Old Person and Young Person looking at the movie poster outside the theater. This way the audience will know where the characters are, and what they're doing.
Question #2
My second frame would be to put the camera in the place where the poster is, so the audience would be looking at the Old Person and Young Person from the front. That's when the Young Person looks up at the Old Person and starts asking him the question. - 2 points (03 March 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 13.png

Maramraj says,

Question #1
Frame 8 would be the first shot as they look at the poster even audience can see what they are looking at.


Question #2
Frame 13 would be the second frame, since the younger started saying something. - 4 points (6 March 2008)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

Raj librans says,

Question #1 & #2
according to me 21st frame should be the first frame and 8th frame should be the second frame - 2 points (March 26, 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

AmosNusheg says,

Question #1
1. I think the 3rd frame I would choose for my first shot, because it shows the two characters in the story and they seem to be in the rule of thirds. With the young person at the left, the old person in the middle, and the movie poster at the right.
Question #2
2. As for my second shot, I would choose the 8th frame, because it shows what the characters are looking at, which is a poster for Star Wars. - 4 points (March 26, 2008)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

Brutal Enigma says,

Question #1
1. My opening shot would be similar to number 21 as I want the physical environment to have a palpable effect on the starkness and emotion of the scene:
EXT. MOVIE THEATER - DOWNTOWN - NIGHT
It is a hot summer night, it has been raining. The lights on the cinema marquee flicker.
The old theater seems to be closing; the downtown streets and sidewalks are empty and silent, save for the far-off din of a woman having an argument on a cellphone.
Question #2
2. My second shot, which would be the first shot with dialogue, would be similar to number 22 with the focus shifting from the YOUNG PERSON to the OLD PERSON as a moviegoer walks up the sidewalk toward them:
YOUNG PERSON
That was a great movie...
An exiting moviegoer, not looking ahead as they are walking, bumps into the YOUNG PERSON. The moviegoer walks on without remark. The YOUNG PERSON strikes an unneccessarily offended pose. - 4 points (March 30, 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 10.png





SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png





SBTDS Storyboard Shot 20.png

Njoymusic2 says,

Question #1
For the first shot, i would start with 10 and slowly zoom out to end with 8. but instead of having the old and young person already standing there, i would place only the young person on the left (standing, viewing poster). once the shot has reached what frame 8 looks like, with just the young person in it, the older person will walk in from the left, behind the young person, notice him/her standing there, and finally stand beside him/her to view the poster on the right side of the frame to conclude the shot.
  • starting with the poster introduces the subject of the movie, how people get seduced by the dark side
  • combining the young person and the poster in the first shot links his/her curiousity/fascination with the movie and how people get seduced by the dark side
  • the separation of the entrances of the two characters clarifies how their meeting was completely by chance


Question #2
As for the second shot, i would use a combination of frame 20 and 22, not as close-up as 20 but i like the more frontal view it has as opposed to the nearly side-view in 22. perhaps panning (is that the right word?) from shot 22 to shot 20 could work, but that might be too much movement since the 1st shot already involves zooming out. a few seconds into the shot, the young person (looking at poster) says "That was a great movie," and turns to speak to old person: "but I don't understand one thing." end of shot. oh, and everything's flipped, of course, because i've already placed the two people on different sides than in the original choice of frames.
  • the 2nd shot shows the faces of the characters for the first time, so a gentle 3/4 / side view would provide a better transition from their backs to a complete frontal view
  • in both 20 and 22, the young person is in the center of the frame, focusing attention in on him/her, because it is he/she who will say the first line and set the plot into motion
  • i like how both 20 and 22 are framed on the right (in my case it would be on the left) side of the shot by the old person, kind of suggesting a protective, guiding figure he/she will be to the young person
  • i especially like how 22 has the poster and the old person on either side of the younger person: showing how both will have an impact on the young, innocent, person. - 4 points (March 30, 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png

Maji says,

Question #1
My first frame would be number 21 : Because at the begining you have to introduce the location. In 21. frame you can see that you have two performers, they're outside of a cinema and they're looking at a poster.


Question #2
The second frama sould be number 1: Because we have to see that they're looking at a star wars poster. - 4 points (March 31, 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 06.png

Eldorino says,

Question #1
As first frame, I would personnaly chose the number 8, where we clearly see both caracters and general subject. More personnaly, I would even put a camera moving forth, up to a close position in the same type as the picture. I think it would permit to anyone to see, in a simple but efficient way, what it is all about.


Question #2
As second frame, I would take the number 6, where we see both caracters, in a more focused way for dialogs. If possible, I would have done a little "transition" in where the background, including the older person, would become blur, just for the young person sentence. - 4 points (April 5, 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png

Hicks999 says,

Question #1
I think the 1st shot in the storyboard would be #21 (despite being crudely drawn). This shot sets the scene as on several other shots, it doesn't show the location as outside a movie theatre.


Question #2
The next shot should be shot 3, this is because it introduces the characters and sets up the young person to start talking. - 4 points (April 5, 2008)




Heddesheimer Thumbnail 1.jpg
Heddesheimer Thumbnail 2.jpg

Heddesheimer says,

Question #1
I would start with a total of the theater for the first shot to set up the scene for the viewer. This will make it clear that we are now standing in front of a movie theater, maybe people are leaving the theater and you can see what has been played this evening.
Question #2
My second shot would be a close up to the movie poster, then a pan or dolly shot into a more total where you can see the two people in front of the poster. This will convey the connection between the theater (total view) and the movie that has just ended. The camera move shall then introduce the two actors.
Instead of using a camera move from the poster, the actors can also walk into the scene, stopping in front of the poster. - 4 points (April 5, 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

Jiffypop says,

Question #1
I'd start with #21 and zoom into # 8.


Question #2
  1. 21 establishes the scene, and zooming into # 8 leaves the wacther eager to know what is being looked at until we finally get there. - 4 points (April 5, 2008)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 04.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 02.png

Pisomojado101 says,

Question #1
I would choose frame 4 for the first shot of the movie, because it captures both of the movie's main characters. In this shot, you can tell that they are looking at something, yet you don't yet know what they are looking at.


Question #2
I would choose frame 2 for the second shot, because it captures both of the characters, and the poster is completely in view. This brings into focus the two main elements of the movie: the characters, and the plot (which is, in this case, Star Wars). - 4 points (May 17, 2008)




Completed assignment - Pop Quiz
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 06.png

May 19, 2008 -- Flowdark says,

Question #1
I will use the frame number 21 .cuse i think its good for introduce for the secene.


Question #2
I take the frame number 6 due to the story.
Completed assignment - Pop Quiz
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 14.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

June 12, 2008 -- Rick14 says,

Question #1
My answers would be to frame first image 14, a more panoramic view,


Question #2
and then slowly zoom in to 8, where the dialogue can get started properly.


Completed assignment - Pop Quiz
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

June 15, 2008 -- JoshLobel says,

Question #1
My first frame of the movie would be 21 because immediately establishes the setting - we know we have two characters at night, outside of a movie theater.


Question #2
My second frame would be 22 because it creates the contrast of one character being younger and the other older while showing that they are looking at a movie poster.