Instructional design/Spotting PBL/Demonstrating

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search


Course Navigation
Spot PBL
Spotting PBL

Demonstrating

You have dug into PBL and practiced your skills. Now, it is time to demonstrate what you have learned. Below are content scenarios where you have to identify examples of problem-based learning. Let's see how good you are at SPOTTING PBL! Your goal is to 9/10 but go for 10/10!

1

True or False. This is an example of problem-based learning: Undergraduate law students study a unit on eminent domain.The professor teaches them what eminent domain is and the laws surrounding it. They are provided examples and non-examples and have to identify if the resolutions were in alignment with the law.

A. True
B. False

2

True or False. This is an example of problem-based learning: Students in a kindergarten classroom make homemade yogurt with their instructor. While making the yogurt, the instructor asks a series of questions to probe them to critically think about the process. For example, the instructor asks, what about this is alive?, and guides them to a discussion around bacteria. At the end, they eat the yogurt and color a page that shows how yogurt is made up of bacteria.

A. True
B. False

3

True or False. This is an example of problem-based learning: Undergraduate nursing students bring into a podcast into class that introduces a debate around whether nursing is a profession. The students are discussing, "Is nursing a profession?" The students and instructor explore possible answers to this question and look at the question from a variety of perspectives in different groups. Through their exploration they get into topics that they were going to cover in the class. The students decide to respond to the podcast authors through Twitter their viewpoints on this question.

A. True
B. False

4

True or False. This is an example of problem-based learning: A group of instructors taking a technology class listen to the guest speaker's presentation about the 21st century classroom. The speaker offers numerous examples of technology that could be implemented in their classrooms. At the end they are asked to consider, how will you transform your classroom to meet the needs of the 21st century learner? For homework, they are asked to write a paper and include examples from the presentation.

A. True
B. False

5

True or False. This is an example of problem-based learning: High school seniors taking economics receive a school-wide text with a recent U.S. News and World Report article with the headline, 'College is no longer necessary for success in the real world' When they come into class, student are discussing the text and the instructor asks them their thoughts. Over the next two weeks, students gather information to understand the issue more fully. They discuss, reflect and collect information. The instructor serves as a tutor and supports students as needed but doesn't teach them the content. In the end, many students explore the issue from multiple perspectives (e.g., parents, colleges administrators, high school students, a loan officer, and graduates). They learn about essential social and economic topics through their self-directed exploration and propose plans on the benefits and drawbacks of college.

A. True
B. False

6

True or False. This is an essential feature of problem-based learning: The instructor is considered an expert resource and teaches students exactly what they need to learn.

A. True
B. False

7

True or False. This is an essential feature of problem-based learning: The instructor may be part of a tutor group exploring the issue along with the students.

A. True
B. False

8

True or False. This is an essential feature of problem-based learning: An authentic case engages students into the relevant content.

A. True
B. False

9

True or False. This is an essential feature of problem-based learning: The students are engaging in critical thinking through problem-solving.

A. True
B. False

10

True or False. This is an essential feature of problem-based learning: Students work in groups to explore a problem from a variety of perspectives.

A. True
B. False


Did you get +10/10? Awesome job! You were able to Spot PBL
Spot PBL
If not, be sure you read the feedback.>>