Instructional design/CARP

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The CARP Model Fits within the Development Portion of the ADDIE Model[edit]

Addie-development.png

Introduction[edit]

Your audience members stifle a yawn and glance down at their smartphones. They are clearly not captivated by the incredibly plain and boring PowerPoint presentation you are attempting to deliver. You may be wondering why you can't hold their attention with your obvious passion and fascinating content. Perhaps it has to do with visual appeal. If this description sounds similar to something you have experienced, or something you wish to prevent in the future, then the CARP model is for you. Whether you are creating a presentation or writing a book chapter, this model will improve the effectiveness of your training material and make it more engaging.

Lesson Goal[edit]

The goal of this lesson is for learners to be able to accomplish the following task, several months after completing the instruction:

Novice instructional designers will apply CARP design principles to a presentation that lacks them, resulting in learners quickly decoding content and appreciating the slide presentation’s esthetics.

Objectives[edit]

In this lesson, you take the role of a novice instructional designer to apply CARP design principles to a presentation that lacks them. After completing the lesson, you will be able to perform the following behaviors:

  • Given text that lacks CARP design principles, create a new four-slide Microsoft PowerPoint presentation, adding the provided text to each slide as indicated and then correctly applying the listed design principle.
  • Type the names of the four CARP design principles without using references.
  • Given a list of descriptions and a CARP design principle, choose the correct description.
  • Given a list of reasons and a CARP design principle, choose all the correct reasons for using that principle.

Lesson Overview[edit]

This lesson consists of 7 parts:

  1. CARP Description
  2. Names of CARP Principles
  3. Design Principle Descriptions
  4. Reasons to Use Each Principle
  5. Applying the Design Principles
  6. Comparing Your Presentation to the Solution
  7. Review

You will first be provided with a description of CARP. This will be followed by the names of each CARP design principle and a mnemonic to memorize, before being asked to fill in the blanks with the names of these design principles. Then, you will be presented with descriptions of each of these design principles and asked to select the one correct multiple choice response. Next, you will be presented with the reasons for using each CARP design principle and instructed to select all correct multiple choice responses. After, you will be asked to create a new four-slide Microsoft PowerPoint presentation, adding the provided sections of text devoid of CARP design principles to each slide as indicated and then correctly applying the specified principles to the content. Finally, you will view example presentation slides that correctly apply all four CARP design principles to compare your work to. Lastly, you will be presented with a summary of the content you have learned in this lesson.


Click the Next button to continue.

ID Homepage CARP Next >

References[edit]