IT Service Management/Service Design

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Service design includes the design of the services, governing practices, processes and policies required to realize the service provider’s strategy and to facilitate the introduction of services into supported environments. Service design includes the processes of design coordination, service catalog management, service level management, availability management, capacity management, IT service continuity management, information security management, and supplier management.[1]

Objectives and Skills[edit]

Objectives and skills for the Service Design portion of ITIL Foundation certification include:[2]

  • Account for the purpose, objectives and scope of service design
  • Briefly explain what value service design provides to the business
  • Understand the importance of people, processes, products and partners for service management
  • Understand the five major aspects of service design:
    • Service solutions for new or changed services
    • Management information systems and tools
    • Technology architectures and management architectures
    • The processes required
    • Measurement methods and metrics
  • Explain the purpose, objectives, scope, basic concepts, process activities and interfaces for:
    • Service level management (SLM)
    • Service-based SLA
    • Multi-level SLAs
    • Service level requirements (SLRs)
    • SLA monitoring (SLAM) chart
    • Service review
    • Service improvement plan (SIP)
    • The relationship between SLM and BRM
  • State the purpose, objectives and scope for:
    • Service catalog management
    • Availability management
    • Service availability
    • Component availability
    • Reliability
    • Maintainability
    • Serviceability
    • Vital business functions (VBF)
    • Information security management (ISM)
      • Information security policy
    • Supplier management
      • Supplier categories
    • Capacity management
      • Capacity plan
      • Business capacity management
      • Service capacity management
      • Component capacity management
    • IT service continuity management
      • Purpose of business impact analysis (BIA)
      • Risk assessment
    • Design coordination
  • Define and explain:
    • Availability
    • Operational level agreement (OLA)
    • Service catalog (both two-view and three-view types)
    • Service design package
    • Service level agreement (SLA)
    • Underpinning contract

Readings[edit]

  1. Wikipedia: Service Design
  2. Wikibooks: ITIL v3 Service Design
  3. Wikipedia: ITIL#Service design
  4. Wikipedia: Service catalog
  5. Wikipedia: Service-level agreement
  6. Wikipedia: Availability
  7. Wikipedia: Capacity management
  8. Wikipedia: Business continuity
  9. Wikipedia: ITIL security management
  10. Wikipedia: Supply management (procurement)
  11. Archive.org: ITIL.org: Service Design
  12. UCISA: ITIL - Introducing Service Design

Multimedia[edit]

  1. YouTube: Introduction to ITIL Service Design
  2. YouTube: What Is The Value Of Service Design To A Business
  3. YouTube: Service Design
  4. YouTube: Service Catalog Explained Simply

Activities[edit]

  1. Describe the purpose, objectives and scope of service design and explain what value service design provides to the business.
  2. Describe the importance of people, processes, products and partners in service management. Include examples for each.
  3. Explain the five major aspects of service design and include examples for each:
    • Service solutions for new or changed services
    • Management information systems and tools
    • Technology architectures and management architectures
    • The processes required
    • Measurement methods and metrics
  4. Explain the purpose, objectives, scope, basic concepts, process activities and interfaces for service level management, including:
    • Service level management (SLM)
    • Service level agreements (SLAs)
    • Service level requirements (SLRs)
    • SLA monitoring (SLAM) chart
    • Service review
    • Service improvement plan (SIP)
    • The relationship between SLM and BRM
  5. Explain the purpose, objectives, and scope for one or more of the following service design processes and include examples:
    • Design coordination
    • Service catalog management
    • Service level management
    • Availability management
    • Capacity management
    • IT service continuity management
    • Information security management
    • Supplier management
  6. Case Project - Continue the hypothetical organization and service desk design your team documented in the previous lesson. Add the following information to the Service Design section.
    • Based on the greatest challenge or opportunity identified in the previous lesson, identify a service solution for new or changed services for the service desk. Describe the new or changed services proposal.
    • Describe any management information systems or tools necessary to implement this proposal.
    • Describe any necessary technology architecture changes or management architecture changes necessary to implement this proposal.
    • Describe the processes that would be impacted by this proposal, including service level, capacity, availability, continuity, and security.
    • Describe the measurement methods and metrics that would be used to determine whether or not the proposal is successful.
    • Define the parameters for a service level agreement that could be used to support this proposal. Include appropriate levels for the metrics identified above.
  7. Use the Discuss page to post comments and questions regarding this lesson.
  8. Review the lesson summary, key terms, review questions and assessments below.

Lesson Summary[edit]

  • Service design includes the design of the services, governing practices, processes and policies required to realize the service provider’s strategy and to facilitate the introduction of services into supported environments. Service design includes the following processes: design coordination, service catalog management, service level management, availability management, capacity management, IT service continuity management, information security management, and supplier management.[3]
  • The value service design provides to the business is efficient services that match business requirements of capacity, continuity, availability, security, and functionality at an affordable cost.[4]
  • People are assets of the organization who help to deliver an IT service through their abilities to carry out activities.[5]
  • Processes are structured sets of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. A process takes one or more defined inputs and turns them into defined outputs. It may include any of the roles, responsibilities, tools and management controls required to reliably deliver the outputs. A process may define policies, standards, guidelines, activities and work instructions if they are needed.[6]
  • Products are items produced or purchased, and distinct from services that are provided.[7]
  • Partners form a relationship that involves working closely together for common goals or mutual benefit. The IT service provider should have a partnership with the business and with third parties who are critical to the delivery of IT services.[8]
  • The five major aspects of service design are service solutions for new or changed services, management information systems and tools, technology architectures and management architectures, the processes required, and measurement methods and metrics.[9]
  • Service level management (SLM) is the service design process responsible for negotiating achievable service level agreements and ensuring that these are met. It is responsible for ensuring that all IT service management processes, operational level agreements and underpinning contracts are appropriate for the agreed service level targets. Service level management monitors and reports on service levels, holds regular service reviews with customers, and identifies required improvements.[10]
  • A service level agreement (SLA) is an agreement between an IT service provider and a customer which describes the IT service, documents service level targets, and specifies the responsibilities of the IT service provider and the customer. A single agreement may cover multiple IT services or multiple customers.[11]
  • Service level agreements may be service-based, customer-based, or multi-level. A multi-level SLA includes a corporate level for the organization, a customer level for the customer, and a service level for each service covered by the agreement.[12]
  • Service level requirements (SLRs) are customer requirements for an aspect of an IT service. Service level requirements are based on business objectives and used to negotiate agreed service level targets.[13]
  • An SLA monitoring (SLAM) chart is used to help monitor and report achievements against service level targets. A SLAM chart is typically color-coded to show whether each agreed service level target has been met, missed or nearly missed during each of the previous 12 months.[14]
  • A service review meeting should be held with customers monthly or quarterly to review any major incidents, service reports, improvement plans, changes anticipated, etc.[15]
  • Service improvement plan (SIP) is a formal plan to implement improvements to a process or IT service.[16]
  • Business relationship management (BRM) is the service strategy process responsible for maintaining a positive relationship with customers. Business relationship management identifies customer needs and ensures that the service provider is able to meet these needs with an appropriate catalog of services. This process has strong links with service level management.[17]
  • Service catalog management is the process responsible for providing and maintaining the service catalog and for ensuring that it is available to those who are authorized to access it.[18]
  • Availability management is the process responsible for ensuring that IT services meet the current and future availability needs of the business in a cost-effective and timely manner. Availability management defines, analyses, plans, measures and improves all aspects of the availability of IT services, and ensures that all IT infrastructures, processes, tools, roles etc. are appropriate for the agreed service level targets for availability.[19]
  • Service availability is the ability of an IT service to perform its agreed function when required. [20]
  • Component availability is the ability of a configuration item to perform its agreed function when required.[21]
  • Reliability is a measure of how long an IT service or other configuration item can perform its agreed function without interruption, usually measured as MTBF or MTBSI.[22]
  • Maintainability is a measure of how quickly and effectively an IT service or other configuration item can be restored to normal working after a failure, often measured and reported as MTRS.[23]
  • Serviceability is the ability of a third-party supplier to meet the terms of its contract. This contract will include agreed levels of reliability, maintainability and availability for a configuration item.[24]
  • Vital business functions (VBF) is part of a business process that is critical to the success of the business.[25]
  • Information security management (ISM) is the process responsible for ensuring that the confidentiality, integrity and availability of an organization’s assets, information, data and IT services match the agreed needs of the business. Information security management supports business security and has a wider scope than that of the IT service provider, and includes handling of paper, building access, phone calls etc. for the entire organization.[26]
  • Information security policy is the policy that governs the organization’s approach to information security management.[27]
  • Supplier management is the process responsible for obtaining value for money from suppliers, ensuring that all contracts and agreements with suppliers support the needs of the business, and that all suppliers meet their contractual commitments.[28]
  • Suppliers are categorized based on value and risk. Strategic suppliers are high value, with a high risk of impact for negative performance. Tactical suppliers are medium value and medium risk. Operational suppliers are either low value or low risk. Commodity suppliers are both low value and low risk.[29]
  • Capacity management is the process responsible for ensuring that the capacity of IT services and the IT infrastructure is able to meet agreed capacity- and performance-related requirements in a cost-effective and timely manner. Capacity management considers all resources required to deliver an IT service, and is concerned with meeting both the current and future capacity and performance needs of the business. Capacity management includes three sub-processes: business capacity management, service capacity management, and component capacity management.[30]
  • Capacity plan is a plan used to manage the resources required to deliver IT services. The plan contains details of current and historic usage of IT services and components, and any issues that need to be addressed (including related improvement activities). The plan also contains scenarios for different predictions of business demand and costed options to deliver the agreed service level targets.[31]
  • Business capacity management is the sub- process of capacity management responsible for understanding future business requirements for use in the capacity plan.[32]
  • Service capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding the performance and capacity of IT services. Information on the resources used by each IT service and the pattern of usage over time are collected, recorded and analyzed for use in the capacity plan.[33]
  • Component capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding the capacity, utilization and performance of configuration items. Data is collected, recorded and analyzed for use in the capacity plan.[34]
  • IT service continuity management is the process responsible for managing risks that could seriously affect IT services. IT service continuity management ensures that the IT service provider can always provide minimum agreed service levels, by reducing the risk to an acceptable level and planning for the recovery of IT services. IT service continuity management supports business continuity management.[35]
  • Business impact analysis (BIA) is the activity in business continuity management that identifies vital business functions and their dependencies. These dependencies may include suppliers, people, other business processes, IT services etc. Business impact analysis defines the recovery requirements for IT services. These requirements include recovery time objectives, recovery point objectives and minimum service level targets for each IT service.[36]
  • Risk assessment is the initial steps of risk management: analysing the value of assets to the business, identifying threats to those assets, and evaluating how vulnerable each asset is to those threats. Risk assessment can be quantitative (based on numerical data) or qualitative.[37]
  • Design coordination is the process responsible for coordinating all service design activities, processes and resources. Design coordination ensures the consistent and effective design of new or changed IT services, service management information systems, architectures, technology, processes, information and metrics.[38]
  • Availability is the ability of an IT service or other configuration item to perform its agreed function when required. Availability is determined by reliability, maintainability, serviceability, performance and security. Availability is usually calculated as a percentage. This calculation is often based on agreed service time and downtime, and it is best practice to calculate availability of an IT service using measurements of the business output.[39]
  • Operational level agreement (OLA) is an agreement between an IT service provider and another part of the same organization.[40]
  • Service catalog (both two-view and three-view types) is a database or structured document with information about all live IT services, including those available for deployment. The service catalog is part of the service portfolio and contains information about two types of IT service: customer-facing services that are visible to the business; and supporting services required by the service provider to deliver customer-facing services.[41]
  • A service design package is document(s) defining all aspects of an IT service and its requirements through each stage of its lifecycle. A service design package is produced for each new IT service, major change or IT service retirement.[42]
  • An underpinning contract is a contract between an IT service provider and a third party. The third party provides goods or services that support delivery of an IT service to a customer. The underpinning contract defines targets and responsibilities that are required to meet agreed service level targets in one or more service level agreements.[43]

Key Terms[edit]

Key Terms definitions are copyright © AXELOS Limited 2011. All rights reserved. Material is reproduced with the permission of AXELOS.[44]

agreed service time (AST)
A synonym for service hours, commonly used in formal calculations of availability.
analytical modelling
A technique that uses mathematical models to predict the behaviour of IT services or other configuration items.
application portfolio
A database or structured document used to manage applications throughout their lifecycle.
application service provider (ASP)
An external service provider that provides IT services using applications running at the service provider’s premises.
application sizing
The activity responsible for understanding the resource requirements needed to support a new application, or a major change to an existing application.
architecture
The structure of a system or IT service, including the relationships of components to each other and to the environment they are in.
availability
Ability of an IT service or other configuration item to perform its agreed function when required.
availability management (AM)
The process responsible for ensuring that IT services meet the current and future availability needs of the business in a cost-effective and timely manner.
availability management information system (AMIS)
A set of tools, data and information that is used to support availability management.
availability plan
A plan to ensure that existing and future availability requirements for IT services can be provided cost- effectively.
backup
Copying data to protect against loss of integrity or availability of the original.
brainstorming
A technique that helps a team to generate ideas.
business capacity management
In the context of ITSM, business capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding future business requirements for use in the capacity plan.
business continuity management (BCM)
The business process responsible for managing risks that could seriously affect the business.
business continuity plan (BCP)
A plan defining the steps required to restore business processes following a disruption.
capacity
The maximum throughput that a configuration item or IT service can deliver.
capacity management
The process responsible for ensuring that the capacity of IT services and the IT infrastructure is able to meet agreed capacity- and performance-related requirements in a cost-effective and timely manner.
capacity management information system (CMIS)
A set of tools, data and information that is used to support capacity management.
capacity plan
A plan used to manage the resources required to deliver IT services, including details of current and historic usage of IT services and components, and any issues that need to be addressed (including related improvement activities).
capacity planning
The activity within capacity management responsible for creating a capacity plan.
commercial off the shelf (COTS)
Pre-existing application software or middleware that can be purchased from a third party.
component capacity management (CCM)
The sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding the capacity, utilization and performance of configuration items.
component failure impact analysis (CFIA)
A technique that helps to identify the impact of configuration item failure on IT services and the business.
confidentiality
A security principle that requires that data should only be accessed by authorized people.
continuous availability
An approach or design to achieve 100% availability.
continuous operation
An approach or design to eliminate planned downtime of an IT service.
customer-facing service
An IT service that is visible to the customer.
demand management
The process responsible for understanding, anticipating and influencing customer demand for services.
design
An activity or process that identifies requirements and then defines a solution that is able to meet these requirements.
design coordination
The process responsible for coordinating all service design activities, processes and resources.
development
The process responsible for creating or modifying an IT service or application ready for subsequent release and deployment.
development environment
An environment used to create or modify IT services or applications.
downtime
The time when an IT service or other configuration item is not available during its agreed service time.
expanded incident lifecycle
Detailed stages in the lifecycle of an incident.
fast recovery
A recovery option that is also known as hot standby, which normally uses a dedicated fixed facility with computer systems and software configured ready to run the IT services.
fault tolerance
The ability of an IT service or other configuration item to continue to operate correctly after failure of a component part.
fault tree analysis (FTA)
A technique that can be used to determine a chain of events that has caused an incident, or may cause an incident in the future.
fixed facility
A permanent building, available for use when needed by an IT service continuity plan.
gradual recovery
A recovery option that is also known as cold standby, which typically uses a portable or fixed facility that has environmental support and network cabling, but no computer systems.
high availability
An approach or design that minimizes or hides the effects of configuration item failure from the users of an IT service.
immediate recovery
A recovery option that is also known as hot standby, in which provision is made to recover the IT service with no significant loss of service to the customer.
information security management (ISM)
The process responsible for ensuring that the confidentiality, integrity and availability of an organization’s assets, information, data and IT services match the agreed needs of the business.
information security management system (ISMS)
The framework of policy, processes, functions, standards, guidelines and tools that ensures an organization can achieve its information security management objectives.
information security policy
The policy that governs the organization’s approach to information security management.
integrity
A security principle that ensures data and configuration items are modified only by authorized personnel and activities.
intermediate recovery
A recovery option that is also known as warm standby, which usually uses a shared portable or fixed facility that has computer systems and network components.
invocation
Initiation of the steps defined in a plan.
ISO/IEC 27001
An international specification for information security management.
IT service continuity management (ITSCM)
The process responsible for managing risks that could seriously affect IT services.
IT service continuity plan
A plan defining the steps required to recover one or more IT services.
IT steering group (ISG)
A formal group that is responsible for ensuring that business and IT service provider strategies and plans are closely aligned.
key performance indicator (KPI)
A metric that is used to help manage an IT service, process, plan, project or other activity.
maintainability
A measure of how quickly and effectively an IT service or other configuration item can be restored to normal working after a failure.
management information system (MIS)
A set of tools, data and information that is used to support a process or function.
mean time between failures (MTBF)
The average time that an IT service or other configuration item can perform its agreed function without interruption, measured from when the configuration item starts working, until it next fails.
mean time between service incidents (MTBSI)
The mean time from when a system or IT service fails, until it next fails, which is equal to MTBF plus MTRS.
middleware
Software that connects two or more software components or applications.
operational level agreement (OLA)
An agreement between an IT service provider and another part of the same organization.
percentage utilization
The amount of time that a component is busy over a given period of time.
planned downtime
Agreed time when an IT service will not be available.
portable facility
A prefabricated building, or a large vehicle, provided by a third party and moved to a site when needed according to an IT service continuity plan.
project management office (PMO)
A function or group responsible for managing the lifecycle of projects.
project portfolio
A database or structured document used to manage projects throughout their lifecycle.
RACI
A model used to help define roles and responsibilities, which stands for responsible, accountable, consulted and informed.
reciprocal arrangement
An agreement between two organizations to share resources in an emergency.
recovery
Returning a configuration item or an IT service to a working state.
recovery option
A strategy for responding to an interruption to service.
recovery point objective (RPO)
The maximum amount of data that may be lost when service is restored after an interruption.
recovery time objective (RTO)
The maximum time allowed for the recovery of an IT service following an interruption.
redundancy
Use of one or more additional configuration items to provide fault tolerance.
reliability
A measure of how long an IT service or other configuration item can perform its agreed function without interruption.
requirement
A formal statement of what is needed.
resilience
The ability of an IT service or other configuration item to resist failure or to recover in a timely manner following a failure.
return to normal
The phase of an IT service continuity plan during which full normal operations are resumed.
security management information system (SMIS)
A set of tools, data and information that is used to support information security management.
service capacity management (SCM)
The sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding the performance and capacity of IT services.
service catalog
A database or structured document with information about all live IT services, including those available for deployment.
service catalog management
The process responsible for providing and maintaining the service catalog and for ensuring that it is available to those who are authorized to access it.
service charter
A document that contains details of a new or changed service.
service design
A stage in the lifecycle of a service, which includes the design of the services, governing practices, processes and policies required to realize the service provider’s strategy and to facilitate the introduction of services into supported environments.
service design package (SDP)
Document(s) defining all aspects of an IT service and its requirements through each stage of its lifecycle.
service failure analysis (SFA)
A technique that identifies underlying causes of one or more IT service interruptions.
service hours
An agreed time period when a particular IT service should be available.
service level agreement (SLA)
An agreement between an IT service provider and a customer which describes the IT service, documents service level targets, and specifies the responsibilities of the IT service provider and the customer.
service level management (SLM)
The process responsible for negotiating achievable service level agreements and ensuring that these are met.
service level requirement (SLR)
A customer requirement for an aspect of an IT service.
service level target
A commitment that is documented in a service level agreement.
service option
A choice of utility and warranty offered to customers by a core service or service package.
serviceability
The ability of a third-party supplier to meet the terms of its contract.
simulation modelling
A technique that creates a detailed model to predict the behaviour of an IT service or other configuration item.
single point of failure (SPOF)
Any configuration item that can cause an incident when it fails, and for which a countermeasure has not been implemented.
SMART
An acronym for helping to remember that targets in service level agreements and project plans should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound.
standby
Used to refer to resources that are not required to deliver the live IT services, but are available to support IT service continuity plans.
statement of requirements (SOR)
A document containing all requirements for a product purchase, or a new or changed IT service.
supplier
A third party responsible for supplying goods or services that are required to deliver IT services.
supplier and contract management information system (SCMIS)
A set of tools, data and information that is used to support supplier management.
supplier management
The process responsible for obtaining value for money from suppliers, ensuring that all contracts and agreements with suppliers support the needs of the business, and that all suppliers meet their contractual commitments.
support hours
The times or hours when support is available to the users.
supporting service
An IT service that is not directly used by the business, but is required by the IT service provider to deliver customer-facing services.
terms of reference (TOR)
A document specifying the requirements, scope, deliverables, resources and schedule for a project or activity.
throughput
A measure of the number of transactions or other operations performed in a fixed time.
underpinning contract (UC)
A contract between an IT service provider and a third party.
urgency
A measure of how long it will be until an incident, problem or change has a significant impact on the business.
usability
The ease with which an application, product or IT service can be used. Usability requirements are often included in a statement of requirements.
use case
A technique used to define required functionality and objectives, and to design tests.
vital business function (VBF)
Part of a business process that is critical to the success of the business.

Review Questions[edit]

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  1. Service design includes _____, _____, _____ and _____ required to realize the service provider’s strategy and to facilitate the introduction of services into supported environments. Service design includes the following processes: _____, _____, _____, _____, _____, _____, _____, and _____.
    Service design includes the design of the services, governing practices, processes and policies required to realize the service provider’s strategy and to facilitate the introduction of services into supported environments. Service design includes the following processes: design coordination, service catalog management, service level management, availability management, capacity management, IT service continuity management, information security management, and supplier management.
  2. The value service design provides to the business is _____.
    The value service design provides to the business is efficient services that match business requirements of capacity, continuity, availability, security, and functionality at an affordable cost.
  3. People are _____.
    People are assets of the organization who help to deliver an IT service through their abilities to carry out activities.
  4. Processes are _____. A process takes one or more defined inputs and turns them into defined outputs. It may include any of the roles, responsibilities, tools and management controls required to reliably deliver the outputs. A process may define _____ if they are needed.
    Processes are structured sets of activities designed to accomplish a specific objective. A process takes one or more defined inputs and turns them into defined outputs. It may include any of the roles, responsibilities, tools and management controls required to reliably deliver the outputs. A process may define policies, standards, guidelines, activities and work instructions if they are needed.
  5. Products are _____.
    Products are items produced or purchased, and distinct from services that are provided.
  6. Partners form _____. The IT service provider should have a partnership with _____.
    Partners form a relationship that involves working closely together for common goals or mutual benefit. The IT service provider should have a partnership with the business and with third parties who are critical to the delivery of IT services.
  7. The five major aspects of service design are _____, _____, _____, _____, and _____.
    The five major aspects of service design are service solutions for new or changed services, management information systems and tools, technology architectures and management architectures, the processes required, and measurement methods and metrics.
  8. Service level management (SLM) is the service design process responsible for _____. It is responsible for ensuring that all _____, _____ and _____ are appropriate for the agreed service level targets. Service level management _____, _____, and _____.
    Service level management (SLM) is the service design process responsible for negotiating achievable service level agreements and ensuring that these are met. It is responsible for ensuring that all IT service management processes, operational level agreements and underpinning contracts are appropriate for the agreed service level targets. Service level management monitors and reports on service levels, holds regular service reviews with customers, and identifies required improvements.
  9. A service level agreement (SLA) is an agreement between _____ and _____ which describes _____, documents _____, and specifies _____. A single agreement may cover multiple IT services or multiple customers.
    A service level agreement (SLA) is an agreement between an IT service provider and a customer which describes the IT service, documents service level targets, and specifies the responsibilities of the IT service provider and the customer. A single agreement may cover multiple IT services or multiple customers.
  10. Service level agreements may be _____-based, _____-based, or _____. A _____ SLA includes a corporate level for the organization, a customer level for the customer, and a service level for each service covered by the agreement.
    Service level agreements may be service-based, customer-based, or multi-level. A multi-level SLA includes a corporate level for the organization, a customer level for the customer, and a service level for each service covered by the agreement.
  11. Service level requirements (SLRs) are _____. Service level requirements are based on _____ and used to negotiate _____.
    Service level requirements (SLRs) are customer requirements for an aspect of an IT service. Service level requirements are based on business objectives and used to negotiate agreed service level targets.
  12. An SLA monitoring (SLAM) chart is used to _____. A SLAM chart is typically color-coded to show _____ during each of the previous 12 months.
    An SLA monitoring (SLAM) chart is used to help monitor and report achievements against service level targets. A SLAM chart is typically color-coded to show whether each agreed service level target has been met, missed or nearly missed during each of the previous 12 months.
  13. A service review meeting should be held with customers _____ to review _____, _____, _____, _____, etc.
    A service review meeting should be held with customers monthly or quarterly to review any major incidents, service reports, improvement plans, changes anticipated, etc.
  14. Service improvement plan (SIP) is a formal plan to implement improvements to a _____ or _____.
    Service improvement plan (SIP) is a formal plan to implement improvements to a process or IT service.
  15. Business relationship management (BRM) is the service strategy process responsible for _____. Business relationship management identifies _____ and ensures that the service provider is able to _____. This process has strong links with service level management.
    Business relationship management (BRM) is the service strategy process responsible for maintaining a positive relationship with customers. Business relationship management identifies customer needs and ensures that the service provider is able to meet these needs with an appropriate catalog of services. This process has strong links with service level management.
  16. Service catalog management is the process responsible for _____ and for ensuring that it is _____.
    Service catalog management is the process responsible for providing and maintaining the service catalog and for ensuring that it is available to those who are authorized to access it.
  17. Availability management is the process responsible for _____. Availability management _____ all aspects of the availability of IT services, and ensures that _____ are appropriate for the agreed service level targets for availability.
    Availability management is the process responsible for ensuring that IT services meet the current and future availability needs of the business in a cost-effective and timely manner. Availability management defines, analyses, plans, measures and improves all aspects of the availability of IT services, and ensures that all IT infrastructures, processes, tools, roles etc. are appropriate for the agreed service level targets for availability.
  18. Service availability is the _____.
    Service availability is the ability of an IT service to perform its agreed function when required.
  19. Component availability is the _____.
    Component availability is the ability of a configuration item to perform its agreed function when required.
  20. Reliability is a measure of _____, usually measured as _____.
    Reliability is a measure of how long an IT service or other configuration item can perform its agreed function without interruption, usually measured as MTBF or MTBSI.
  21. Maintainability is a measure of _____, often measured and reported as _____.
    Maintainability is a measure of how quickly and effectively an IT service or other configuration item can be restored to normal working after a failure, often measured and reported as MTRS.
  22. Serviceability is the ability of _____ to meet the terms of its contract. This contract will include _____, _____ and _____ for a configuration item.
    Serviceability is the ability of a third-party supplier to meet the terms of its contract. This contract will include agreed levels of reliability, maintainability and availability for a configuration item.
  23. Vital business functions (VBF) is _____.
    Vital business functions (VBF) is part of a business process that is critical to the success of the business.
  24. Information security management (ISM) is the process responsible for ensuring that the _____, _____ and _____ of an organization’s assets, information, data and IT services match the agreed needs of the business. Information security management supports business security and has a wider scope than that of the IT service provider, and includes _____ for the entire organization.
    Information security management (ISM) is the process responsible for ensuring that the confidentiality, integrity and availability of an organization’s assets, information, data and IT services match the agreed needs of the business. Information security management supports business security and has a wider scope than that of the IT service provider, and includes handling of paper, building access, phone calls etc. for the entire organization.
  25. Information security policy is the policy that governs _____.
    Information security policy is the policy that governs the organization’s approach to information security management.
  26. Supplier management is the process responsible for _____, _____, and _____.
    Supplier management is the process responsible for obtaining value for money from suppliers, ensuring that all contracts and agreements with suppliers support the needs of the business, and that all suppliers meet their contractual commitments.
  27. Suppliers are categorized based on _____ and _____. Strategic suppliers are _____, with _____. Tactical suppliers are _____ and _____. Operational suppliers are either _____ or _____. Commodity suppliers are both _____ and _____.
    Suppliers are categorized based on value and risk. Strategic suppliers are high value, with a high risk of impact for negative performance. Tactical suppliers are medium value and medium risk. Operational suppliers are either low value or low risk. Commodity suppliers are both low value and low risk.
  28. Capacity management is the process responsible for ensuring that _____. Capacity management considers _____, and is concerned with meeting _____. Capacity management includes three sub-processes: _____, _____, and _____.
    Capacity management is the process responsible for ensuring that the capacity of IT services and the IT infrastructure is able to meet agreed capacity- and performance-related requirements in a cost-effective and timely manner. Capacity management considers all resources required to deliver an IT service, and is concerned with meeting both the current and future capacity and performance needs of the business. Capacity management includes three sub-processes: business capacity management, service capacity management, and component capacity management.
  29. Capacity plan is _____. The plan contains _____, and _____. The plan also contains _____.
    Capacity plan is a plan used to manage the resources required to deliver IT services. The plan contains details of current and historic usage of IT services and components, and any issues that need to be addressed (including related improvement activities). The plan also contains scenarios for different predictions of business demand and costed options to deliver the agreed service level targets.
  30. Business capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for _____.
    Business capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding future business requirements for use in the capacity plan.
  31. Service capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for _____. Information on _____ and _____ are collected, recorded and analyzed for use in the capacity plan.
    Service capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding the performance and capacity of IT services. Information on the resources used by each IT service and the pattern of usage over time are collected, recorded and analyzed for use in the capacity plan.
  32. Component capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for _____. Data is collected, recorded and analyzed for use in the capacity plan.
    Component capacity management is the sub-process of capacity management responsible for understanding the capacity, utilization and performance of configuration items. Data is collected, recorded and analyzed for use in the capacity plan.
  33. IT service continuity management is the process responsible for _____. IT service continuity management ensures that _____, by _____ and _____. IT service continuity management supports business continuity management.
    IT service continuity management is the process responsible for managing risks that could seriously affect IT services. IT service continuity management ensures that the IT service provider can always provide minimum agreed service levels, by reducing the risk to an acceptable level and planning for the recovery of IT services. IT service continuity management supports business continuity management.
  34. Business impact analysis (BIA) is _____. These dependencies may include _____. Business impact analysis defines _____. These requirements include _____.
    Business impact analysis (BIA) is the activity in business continuity management that identifies vital business functions and their dependencies. These dependencies may include suppliers, people, other business processes, IT services etc. Business impact analysis defines the recovery requirements for IT services. These requirements include recovery time objectives, recovery point objectives and minimum service level targets for each IT service.
  35. Risk assessment is the initial steps of risk management: _____, _____, and _____. Risk assessment can be quantitative (based on numerical data) or qualitative.
    Risk assessment is the initial steps of risk management: analyzing the value of assets to the business, identifying threats to those assets, and evaluating how vulnerable each asset is to those threats. Risk assessment can be quantitative (based on numerical data) or qualitative.
  36. Design coordination is the process responsible for _____. Design coordination ensures _____.
    Design coordination is the process responsible for coordinating all service design activities, processes and resources. Design coordination ensures the consistent and effective design of new or changed IT services, service management information systems, architectures, technology, processes, information and metrics.
  37. Availability is the ability of an IT service or other configuration item to _____. Availability is determined by _____. Availability is usually calculated as a percentage. This calculation is often based on _____ and _____, and it is best practice to calculate availability of an IT service using _____.
    Availability is the ability of an IT service or other configuration item to perform its agreed function when required. Availability is determined by reliability, maintainability, serviceability, performance and security. Availability is usually calculated as a percentage. This calculation is often based on agreed service time and downtime, and it is best practice to calculate availability of an IT service using measurements of the business output.
  38. Operational level agreement (OLA) is an agreement between _____ and _____.
    Operational level agreement (OLA) is an agreement between an IT service provider and another part of the same organization.
  39. Service catalog (both two-view and three-view types) is _____, including those available for deployment. The service catalog is part of the service portfolio and contains information about two types of IT service: _____ that are visible to the business; and _____ required by the service provider to deliver _____.
    Service catalog (both two-view and three-view types) is a database or structured document with information about all live IT services, including those available for deployment. The service catalog is part of the service portfolio and contains information about two types of IT service: customer-facing services that are visible to the business; and supporting services required by the service provider to deliver customer-facing services.
  40. A service design package is document(s) defining all _____ through each stage of its lifecycle. A service design package is produced for _____.
    A service design package is document(s) defining all aspects of an IT service and its requirements through each stage of its lifecycle. A service design package is produced for each new IT service, major change or IT service retirement.
  41. An underpinning contract is a contract between _____ and _____. The _____ provides goods or services that support _____. The underpinning contract defines _____.
    An underpinning contract is a contract between an IT service provider and a third party. The third party provides goods or services that support delivery of an IT service to a customer. The underpinning contract defines targets and responsibilities that are required to meet agreed service level targets in one or more service level agreements.

Assessments[edit]

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

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  1. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  2. ITIL Foundation Syllabus
  3. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  4. Gallacher, Liz and Morris, Helen. (2012). ITIL Foundation Exam Study Guide. Sybex. ISBN 9781119942757
  5. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  6. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  7. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  8. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  9. ITIL Foundation Syllabus
  10. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  11. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  12. Gallacher, Liz and Morris, Helen. (2012). ITIL Foundation Exam Study Guide. Sybex. ISBN 9781119942757
  13. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  14. ITIL Translated Glossaries
  15. Gallacher, Liz and Morris, Helen. (2012). ITIL Foundation Exam Study Guide. Sybex. ISBN 9781119942757
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  29. Gallacher, Liz and Morris, Helen. (2012). ITIL Foundation Exam Study Guide. Sybex. ISBN 9781119942757
  30. ITIL Translated Glossaries
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