Human vision and function/Part 3: Vision in real life: case studies

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Part 3: Vision in real life (case studies)[edit]

The aim of this subject area is to apply what you know about they eye so far in order to understand the way in which eye diseases can affect it. You should be able toː

1. Describe common eye diseases as deviations from normal function.

2. Discuss the sociological implications for individuals with decreased vision.

3. Analyse a problem and clearly define and communicate the outcomes that will resolve or manage it.

This topic addresses Learning Outcomes 3, 4 & 5 (3. Describe common eye diseases as deviations from normal function; 4. Discuss the sociological implications for individuals with decreased vision & 5. Analyse a problem and clearly define and communicate the outcomes that will resolve or manage it).

The material will be presented to you in the form of case studies based on one extended family (the Bastoni and Sinclair family). You will utilise Problem Based Learning as your strategy.

Florence Nightingale.

You should work through all the topics in Part 3 in weeks 8-12 of semester, taking approximately 15-18 hours to complete this section.

Watch the short introductory lectorial on this topic.

Problem based learning[edit]

Problem-based learning (PBL) is a learning strategy whereby students learn about a subject through the experience of problem solving.

An example of how PBL works is outlined below. For this example we need to consider the question "What is vision?".

1. Clarify the problem. Be specific. What specifically do we assume must be involved? Answer. The eye.

2. Identify key elements of the problem. What is vision? Well, if the eye, then what about the eye?

3. Visualise the problem or a relevant process or situation. So, if you want to predict the future of the universe, visualise the big bang and the ensuing events. If you want to open a lock without a key, visualise the lock mechanism.

4. Draw a picture or diagram of the problem or a relevant process or situation. A diagram showing elements (eye and brain) and flow of process from eye to brain

5. Create a model of the problem or a relevant process.

6. Imagine being the problem, a key process, or the solution. For example, if you want to understand space and time, you can imagine, as Einstein did, riding a light beam.

7. Simulate or act out a key element of the problem.

8. Consider a specific example. For instance, what is colour? A specific example could be related to 'when do you see it'?

9. Acquire knowledge of relevant domains. For the question"What is light?" the relevant domain is: 'how' or 'when' does it behave (optics/physics).

10. Change perspective. In terms of understanding vision, what could it be like, not to have vision?

11. Consider levels and systems. If the question relates to eye disease, are there other levels i.e: within community etc. that may influence prevalence?

Sinclair and Bastoni family tree

Case Studies[edit]

Now work your way through each of the cases below. A family tree of the characters is shown here to help you understand their relationships.

3.1 Nick Bastoni

3.2 Sam Sinclair

3.3 Joe Bastoni

3.4 Mary Bastoni

3.5 Marion Sinclair

Web-based resources[edit]

The following list of web-based resources will form the basic information sources for your inquiries for the 'Vision in Real Life Case Studies'. Others will be introduced, as necessary.

La Trobe University Library Guide for Orthoptics

The Vision Correction Website

Glossary of Eye Terminology

Orthoptics Australia Useful Links

Vision 2020 Australia