Did the United States need to use atomic weapons to end World War II?

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The Allied victory in World War II came at a high cost to both sides. The Pacific theatre was only won after the United States dropped two atomic bombs on Japan—the only time that nuclear weapons have been used in warfare. Was this decision necessary? Would the Japanese have capitulated due to conventional warfare anyway? Did the use of A-bombs hasten the end and actually save lives? Could the same goals have been achieved with just one of the bombs?

The United States did need to use atomic weapons to end World War II[edit]

The United States did not need to use atomic weapons to end World War II[edit]

  • Argument Argument The Japanese had already engaged in negotiations with the Soviets to end the war, they just needed more time to finalize the details and wrest control of Japanese society from the generals to the emperor.
  • Argument Argument During The Fog of War biography of Robert Mcnarma, United States Secretary of defense, described the fire bombing of Japanese cities and the corresponding sized American cities. The number of cities is staggering large. In one night the United States burned to death 100,000 citizens of Tokyo. A much larger death toll then the combined nuclear attacks. The United States had no problem killing large numbers of Japanese. Ethically or physically. Would it be more moral to kill less Japanese and have 10,000s United States troops slaughtered on the beaches? Would you care to explain that at your impeachment hearings Mr. President? There was no question that the USA would use the nuclear bombs. Too much time, energy and effort went into producing them, to not use them. Could the USA have won the war without the nuclear bombs, yes, but how many more Japanese cities would be destroyed? What would 'victory' look like?

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