Wikiversity:Assume Good Faith

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Green check.png The page documents an official English Wikiversity policy with wide acceptance by participants as a standard you should follow. Please propose and discuss changes to ensure your revisions reflects consensus.
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To assume good faith is a fundamental principle on Wikiversity. As we allow anyone to edit, it follows that we assume that most people who work on the project are trying to help it, not hurt it. If this weren't true, a project like Wikiversity would be doomed from the beginning. This principle is also called the principle of first trust.

When you can reasonably assume that a mistake someone made was a well-intentioned attempt to further the goals of the project, correct it without criticizing. When you disagree with someone, remember that they probably believe that they are helping the project. Consider using talk pages to explain yourself, and give others the opportunity to do the same. This can avoid misunderstandings and prevent problems from escalating.

Newcomers unaware of Wikiversity's unique culture and the mechanics of Wikiversity editing often make mistakes or fail to respect community norms. It is not uncommon for a newcomer to believe that an unfamiliar policy should be changed to match their experience elsewhere. Similarly, many newcomers bring with them experience or expertise for which they expect immediate respect. Behaviors arising from these perspectives are not malicious.

Obviously, editors can't be expected to assume good faith if, despite the best possible interpretation of another's actions, it is clear that these actions are contrary to the project's goals. Actions inconsistent with good faith contributions to the project's goals include vandalism, sockpuppetry, and other clear instances of intentional deceit.

Assuming good faith also does not mean that no action by editors should be criticized, but instead that criticism should not be attributed to malice unless there is specific evidence of malice. Accusing the other side in a conflict of not assuming good faith, without showing reasonable supporting evidence, is another form of failing to assume good faith.

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