Video software

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This learning project allows participants to explore computer software that is useful for working with digital video files.

Cross platform Video Application[edit]

Cross platform Video Applications are available on Linux, MacOSX and Windows. This makes it easy to swap between operating systems without the need to learn a new Video software.

HandBrake[edit]

Handbrake is an open source video transcoder. It is especially useful if you want to convert the video in specific format to upload it to a video platform or downsize it for using the video on mobile devices.

https://handbrake.fr/

OBS Open Broadcaster Software[edit]

In Wikiversity you might want to show, how a specific feature in software can be used. With OBS authors of a learning resource or tutorial can record their activities on the screen and record their audio comment. The final video (a Screencast) will be recorded by OBS as a video.

https://obsproject.com/

Macintosh OSX[edit]

This part of the page describes Apple and third-party software that can be used to process digital media files.

Apple iMovie[edit]

iMovie 7.0 has been released as part of iLife '08 and represents a major change in the iMovie application. The new version of iMovie is not totally backwards compatible with iMovie 6.

iMovie 6.0[edit]

This version of iMovie appears on Macintosh computers as "iMovie HD". Reading: tutorials from Apple.

Apple's video tutorials and built-in help menu support provide the basic information you need to use iMovie. Additional tips and tricks are discussed below.

iMovie projects. When you use iMovie to work with video files, you work within iMovie "projects". These "projects" have hidden files associated with them. Each video clip in an iMovie project is present as a hidden digital video file (file extension .dv). Digital video files use large amounts of disk space. Five minutes of video can use several gigabytes of space on your hard drive. You can quickly end up with iMovie project files that are too large to backup to a DVD. See below for how to segment such large iMovie project files for backup.

Image sizes. The default size for iMovie HD video projects is 720 x 528 pixels. Reading: iMovie Techniques, Tips and Information. See in particular the section, "Tips for Creating Images in Photoshop to Use in iMovie".

Activity[edit]

Open one of your iMovie project files that contains some video. Position the play head at your favorite frame and

External resources[edit]

GarageBand[edit]

GarageBand 3.0 was a major change from earlier versions. If you are interested in using GarageBand for video projects, versions older than 3.0 are much less useful than version 3.0 and more recent.

Terminal[edit]

Terminal is a Macintosh application that has some useful UNIX commands for manipulating the large files that can arise when working with digital video. For example, HDIUTIL can be used to split a large iMovie project into parts that will fit on DVDs. Reading: Make large files span multiple optical discs by Aaron Adams.

Terminal can also be used to convert QuickTime movie files to ogg format video, the only video format allowed for upload at Wikiversity. See Creating Ogg videos.

GraphicConverter[edit]

GraphicConverter is a powerful Macintosh application for working with digital images and video files. For example, you can use GraphicConverter to make animated GIF files or QuickTime movies from a series of images such as those generated by DAZ Studio.

Windows[edit]

Windows Movie Maker[edit]

This is a provided by default at part of the Windows operating system.

OpenShot (OpenSource)[edit]

If you want to use a VideoEditor on Linux, that has equivalent features like Windows Movie Maker, Open Shot as a video editor might be an option for you on Linux. The OpenSource editor is written Python. The main application will be to compose different videos, audio samples and images into a single video with drag and drop features. Due to the Programming Language Python it is easy to port on other Operating Systems. Furthermore swapping between operating systems without the need to learn a new video editor might be a benefit for you for collaborative work in a team.

http://www.openshot.org/

Adobe Premiere Pro (Commercial)[edit]

Adobe Premiere Pro is a non-linear video editor. The current version CS4 offers considerable advantages over the previous one, including digital video editing, full HD support and Blu-ray and Flash video exporting. Features comparison

GNU-Linux[edit]

KDEnlive[edit]

The OpenSource Software KDEnlive has got its name by an acronym: KDE Non-Linear Video Editor. In the very beginning is primarily aimed at the GNU/Linux platform on the Desktop Environment KDE. But also works on Windows (in beta version), BSD and MacOSX (see KDE Downloads). The current work on the Windows port is beta, so it might contain some issues.

https://kdenlive.org/download/

OpenShot[edit]

If you want to use a VideoEditor on Linux, that has equivalent features like Windows Movie Maker, Open Shot as a video editor might be an option for you on Linux. The OpenSource editor is written Python. The main application will be to compose different videos, audio samples and images into a single video with drag and drop features.

http://www.openshot.org/download/

See also[edit]

Video editing software (Wikipedia)

External links[edit]