Trifluoperazine versus placebo for schizophrenia

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Summary
Trifluoperazine is an effective antipsychotic for people with schizophrenia but it increases the risk of extrapyramidal adverse effects.[1]
Outcome Findings in words Findings in numbers Quality of evidence
Global state
Clinical improvement
Follow-up: average 19 weeks
Trifluoperazine increases the chance of being 'improved' when compared to placebo. Data are based on low quality evidence. RR 4.61 (1.54 to 13.84) Low
Relapse or worsening
Follow-up: average 5 months
Trifluoperazine reduces the risk of relapse when compared with placebo. Data are based on low quality evidence. RR 0.34 (0.23 to 0.49) Low
Mental state
Experiencing 'intensified symptoms'
Follow-up: average 16 weeks
At present it is not possible to be confident about the difference between trifluoperazine and placebo for this outcome and data supporting this finding are very limited. RR 1.05 (0.54 to 2.05) Very low
Leaving the study early
- Because of any reason
Follow-up: average 5 months
Trifluoperazine may reduce loss to follow-up, but, at present it is not possible to be confident about the difference between the two treatments and data supporting this finding are very limited. RR 0.67 (0.38 to 1.19) Very low
- Because of severe adverse effects
Follow-up: average 2 months
It is not possible to be confident about the difference between trifluoperazine and placebo. Data supporting this finding are very limited. RR 1.31 (0.22 to 7.8) Very low
Behavior
Any clinically significant agitation or distress
Follow-up: 4 months
There was no clear differences between trifluoperazine and placebo for this outcome. Data supporting this finding are very limited. RR 2.0 (0.19 to 20.72) Very low
Economic outcomes
No included randomized study reported on economic outcomes.

References[edit]