Template:Film School:Storyboarding:Pop Quiz:Answers3

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Answers to the Pop Quiz on thumbnail storyboarding (continued more).
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 15.png

Elisia Johnson says,

My first frame would be Frame #1 because it would establish the location of the story and what characters are involved.
My second shot would be Frame #15 because it shows that the two characters are looking at the poster and it would also allow the audience to get a closer look at what the characters are looking at. It creates suspense because the audience will be wondering what the interest is in this poster - 4 points (01 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 11.png

Syed sibte hassan says,

I would prefer frame no. 21 created by Deimos. Let me explain you why? the reason why is just because of it is not only the scene but also beginning of the film and here we have to tell the audients that where its took place? and what's the atmosphere around this place? and its shows other peoples activities also it is covering each & everything quite nicely so i think it is very suitable as a first shot of the film.
Second shot should be the 11th one because it is showing our both characters quite nicely which is we have to show our both characters now so it is doing good job that’s it. - 4 points (03 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png

Qwidgey says,

My first shot would be frame 21, a wide establishing shot so that the viewer knows who our characters are and what the location is.
My second shot would be frame 3 because you can see who's talking and what the poster that they're talking about. - 4 points (05 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 15.png

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szahra says,

For the first shot I had to decide upon 15 or 3. The reason being that both of those show the poster so that the audience can see what the two people are looking at and also get a glimpse of the 1 persons looking at it. Since (3) shows the two people's faces I was tempted to choose that over (15) but what I like about (15) is how it shows the proximity of the 2 people and that they are both looking at the same poster. From here my second shot will most likely be (4) where the audience gets the front view of the two persons before they start their conversation. - 4 points (05 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 02.png

SBTDS Storyboard Shot 06.png

Elizabethvnv says,

Question 1

First frame: Frame 21 from the options (a wide shot of the outside of the theater with the two characters standing in front of the movie poster.
Reason: This gives us the full information of where they are and therefore why their conversation is relevant.

Question 2

The second shot should begin with a close up of the boy’s face, the boy smiles as he speaks the first line “That was a great movie...” then his face turns puzzled as he speaks the rest, then zoom out while he is still talking so you can see both characters standing side by side.
Picture no 2 for the second frame and first part the young person's first line, then move the camera to picture no 6 for the second part of the young person's first line.- 4 points (16 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png

Igor Verstovsek says,

Question #1 - What is your first frame for this movie. Why?

Shot from a distance - #21. Provides the context for the scene and sets the overall mood of the scene. You can display the dullness, gray colors, etc.

Question #2 - What is your second shot for this movie?

Shot #3 - the shot displays both characters and the poster, so it is consistent with the previous shot. It also retains the same angle as in previous shot (persons are to the left of the camera).
It introduces the characters, focuses on the younger one. It is shot from her height (with the older figure "above"), signaling we will tell the beginning of the story story from the perspective of the younger one. - 4 points (25 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

Matt James says,

Question #1 - What is your first frame for this movie. Why?

My first frame would be 21, the reason for this is that it gives you a good idea of the setting and includes both characters looking at the movie poster also.

Question #2 - What is your second shot for this movie?

My second shot would be 8, becuase it is a closer view of the poster and also gives the chance to see both characters interact with each other when the first bit of dialogue is spoken. - 4 points (29 October 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 15.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png

Cristiana says,

This story is about an old person and a young person who had just saw the movie "Star Wars". Now they are out looking to the wallpapers. For this action i have chose FRAME No.15 because in this frame we can clearly see the two persons and also the wallpapers.This shot is taken from behind to surprise them looking we can see the place where they are and after this shot comes FRAME No. 3. This is perfect this frame show us in the main plan the young person who really looks curious and he was impressed by the movie (we know that this young person is very curious so the camera is focused on him) and next to him is the old person who`s not cut or outside from the frame so this is very nice cause we can catch both and come out with what we are looking for to represent to show the young person that is curious. - 4 points (05 November 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 10.png

Silver Tonto says,

Question #1 - What is your first frame for this movie. Why?

Shot 1 - Establishing shot introducing both characters as well as setting.

Question #2 - What is your second shot for this movie?

Shot 10 - Establishing the premise of the story or subject -the poster will reveal visually that the story is related to the theme of Star Wars. - 4 points (20 November 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 11.png

Anandabrata says,

I would choose, frame 8 as the first one. The reasoning is that I want to establish that they are outside movie theatre, the movie they have watched shows on the poster, it has both characters and their round about ages. My second frame would be 11, I want to get the expressions of the two people and also maintain continuity of the frames, also that they both are not strangers but together. - 4 points (29 November 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

Janis Hartman says,

On the storyboard: The first shot should be #21. This wide shot gives the audience a lot of information. It is night, outside a movie theater, Star Wars is playing and an older person and a younger person stand next to each other. The next shot should be #22. The camera is centered on the young person, (the first to speak), yet includes the old person, whose nonverbal and verbal response is next. The close up makes the scene more intimate and personal. - 4 points (02 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 03.png

Manuelciosici says,

I would choose option 21 but move the camera a little bit more to the right and film the two characters as they exit the movie theater. I think this should be the first frame because it starts while the characters exit the theater. This would my choice for the first scene because it introduces the viewer very easy to the initial situation. The camera would then approach and move into a position similar to the one in frame 3 . The difference between my frame and the third would be that the camera would be distanced a bit a placed a little more to the left oriented slightly towards the poster. This would make both of the characters and the poster clearly visible so that the viewer can engulfed rapidly into the universe the film is creating. - 4 points (04 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 15.png

pruthvirajg says,

QUESTION 1
FRAME 1: I WILL CHOOSE THE 21 FRAME AS THE FIRST ONE FOR MY SHOOT. IT WILL SERVE AS AN ESTABLISHING SHOT BECAUSE IT CAN SHOW LOCATION(THEATER EXT.),SUBJECTS AND THE STREET. WITH THIS FRAME I THINK THAT THE NARRATION CAN BE STARTED WITH THIS ESTABLISHMENT OF CHARACTERS AND LOCATION.
QUESTION 2
FRAME 2: FOR THE SECOND FRAME I WOULD CHOOSE FRAME 15. THIS WOULD BE APT BECAUSE AFTER ESTABLISHING THE LOCATION , WE SHOULD ALSO ESTABLISH THE CHARACTERS AND MAIN POINT OF STORY THE STAR WARS MOVIE(WHICH IS DEPICTED IN THE POSTER). BOTH THE CHARACTERS ARE AMAZED BY MOVIE THEY JUST SAW AND ARE STILL AWSTUCK SO THEY ARE WATCHING THE POSTER. IN THIS ANGLE WE CAN GET GOOD DETAIL OF POSTER AND CHARACTERS - 4 points (09 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 16.png

brynsee says,

Answer #1 - I choose frame #1 as the first frame of the movie because it shows the characters looking at a movie poster from behind.
Answer #2 - I choose frame #16 as the movie's second frame. - 4 points (13 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png

Davidmp4 says,

My first frame would be number 21, to set the location.
Second would be number 1, to set the conversation. (20 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 20.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png

Hdepuydt says,

Answer 1: hot 20 for frame 1: That is the first shot, so you see the faces of the 2 personages. One from the older man,that is looking Old en wise, and the other of the curious kid.
Answer 2: Second would be number 1, to set the conversation. (19 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
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mkatcher says,

I am ashamed to say that I would use number 21 though I don't think I would have the characters outside in the first frame. It seems that everyone wants that one, but I assume that is because it is an excellent establishing shot. My second shot would be number four because it focuses the attention on the character who is first to speak but keeps the other character on screen and in focus. - 4 points (22 December 2007)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

Brandon.weight says,

Question #1
I would choose Shot #21 as the first shot, because it would be evident that there are two people in the story, outside of a movie theater, and looking at a movie poster. It is a good shot for creating the initial setting.
Question #2
I would choose Shot #22 because this time, the viewer will be able to see the facial expressions of th e characters while they are looking at the movie poster. This will also allow for an easy transition into dialogue. - 4 points (27 December 2007)



SBTDS OpeningBlankQ.jpg
SBTDS OpeningBlankQ.jpg

Dmc1981 says,

Question #1
The first shot would be of the the clear night sky, full of stars. The camera would move slowly down to reveal our two main characters stood outside the cinema. The reason I would use this as the opening shot is that it is the same shot used to open the Star Wars films and would would work as a reference to the film which they have just watched. It would also show the location and time of day from the off.
Question #2
The second would be a shot of the poster with the tag line, "Seduced by the Dark Side." The reason being that this is the main theme of the script. - 2 points (29 December 2007)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

Sereyaco says,

Question #1
My frist frame would be frame no. 21 - Because it has a wide shot of a movie theater and it ehances the theme for the scene, its also good if there are few people entering and exitng in the theater.a few camera movment will be good for this scene
Question #2
And my second fram will be frame no. 22 - I like the balance between the wall and the old person, and a few camera movment will be good for this scene. then at first the old person wll be out of focus, then when he starts to speak the camera will be focused to her. i also like that the poster is not that exposed. - 4 points (30 December 2007)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

Aodonnell says,

Question #1
I like #21. It directly shows how where they are at.
Question #2
I like #22 for its angles. - 4 points (14 January 2008)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 15.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 13.png

Venks says,

Question #1
Thinking that the red shirt is the young fellow.
1st scene -15


Question #2
2nd scene -13 - 2 points (18 January 2008)



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SBTDS Storyboard Shot 22.png

jeff w says,

Question #1
First frame #8
It's a decent establishing shot.
Question #2
second frame #22
Helps support the first shot and now we can see the characters faces, mainly the young person who has the first speaking part in the story. - 4 points (24 January 2008)



SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
Marcus mac storyboard shot 2.JPG

Marcus Mac says,

Question #1 & #2
I would start off with shot 21, to establish where they are, then cut to a medium shot from the poster with the characters looking almost directly into the camera, for a more intimate feel during the dialog.(2nd shot attached) - 4 points (28 January 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 01.png
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Abenisio says,

Question #1
The first frame for the movie is going to be frame 1 because you get a full glance at both characters and the poster.


Question #2
For frame 2, I am going with frame 4 because the poster is no longer needed and you gegood shot of both characters with a closer look at the young person who begins dialogue. - 4 points (01 February 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 21.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 16.png

Mashenka says,

Question #1
As my first frame, I would choose the frame #21 (with the front view of the movie theater), because it provides the spectator with all the initial information: the location (exterior, near the movie theater), the movie the characters have just seen, the placement of our characters (standing in front of the small poster). We could also add some people exiting from the movie theater to indicate that the movie has just ended.


Question #2
A good second frame would be the frame # 16, because it helps to concentrate on our character (the Young Person). That's why we do not need to show the Old Person in this frame. I believe frame #16 is better than frames #2 and # 9 because in these frames the Young Person looks straightly at the spectator, but in frame # 16 we see him looking attentively at the movie poster. The camera is slightly above the Young Person, on the point of view of the Old Person. - 4 points (04 February 2008)




SBTDS Storyboard Shot 10.png
SBTDS Storyboard Shot 08.png

veeravikrama says,

Question #1
I would prefer Screenshot 10 as the first shot for my movie.
Why?
We've to communicate to the audience that the characters have just exited from the theater and that too after watching the movie "Star Wars". Hence the excitement starts the moment the audience see poster of 'Star Wars'. As the initial 5 seconds are very crucial, this will paint a very solid picture in the minds of the audience.


Question #2
For the second shot, I would slowly zoom out from the poster to 'Screenshot 8' which shows two people standing facing the poster. This will communicate that two people are standing and thinking something about 'Star Wars', which obviously the audience would also be thinking by now. This will help the audience to relate to the people standing. - 4 points (07 February 2008)