Talk:Aristotle/Doctrine of Change

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I have removed personal commentary on the "Manuscript" from the resource page to here. Commentary was by User:Glimmerguard. It follows in the section below. I have not investigated the editing of the translation.Abd (discusscontribs) 16:46, 28 December 2013 (UTC)

The material appears to be public domain, from its appearance in the MIT classics archive. It is freely available for download there, and no copyright warnings appeared.

Glimmerguard prefatory comments[edit source]

The "Doctrine of Change" manuscript provided here is written two thousand three hundred and fifty years in the past.

Aristotle's doctrine of change is given in the following locations:

Physics.

Book Three, Parts One through Four.

Book Five, Parts One and Two.

Book Six, Parts Four, Five and Six.

The translation used is by R. P. Hardie and R. K. Gaye.

It is a necessary condition of understanding the metaphysics of cosmology that some account of change be provided.

It is not a necessary condition that the description provided by Aristotle as to the matter of change is the one that is studied. But since the description exists as proved by its being here, in this place, then study of Aristotle's argument is most advantageous. I have made any adjustments to punctuation and grammar to ensure smooth flow of reading in this context.

Glimmerguard closing comment[edit source]

This completes the "Doctrine of Change" Manuscript written by the Wizard Aristotle, as provided here.

For an up to date list of articles written under the present theme, please see:

http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Quantum_Indefinite

Remarks[edit source]

"Quantum Indefinite" is not a WV resource, it was moved to User:Glimmerguard/Quantum Indefinite to allow keeping it as a user essay. —Abd (discusscontribs) 16:46, 28 December 2013 (UTC)

This is not a "manuscript." A manuscript would be in the original language, and generally would be ancient. So the title should probably be changed. The resource appears to consist of excerpts from Aristotle's Physics. I have not investigated the principle behind what is excerpted. —Abd (discusscontribs) 17:13, 28 December 2013 (UTC)