Physiology of Exercise 2

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Deutsch: Vereinfachte Darstellung des menschlichen Blutkreislaufs (Ansicht von vorne). English: Simplified diagram of the human Circulatory system in anterior view. Français : Diagramme simplifié du système circulatoire humain en vue antérieure (en Anglais).

This unit builds upon the knowledge gained in Physiology of Exercise 1, focussing on the response of physiological systems to exercise training, including exercise under environmental challenge and elite sports performance. Topics will be covered with reference to both humans and animal research with applied human sporting examples. The physiology of why we fatigue during exercise and sport will be studied in detail.

Learning objectives[edit]

  1. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the physiological factors that influence adaptation to exercise training and sporting performance;
  2. Use examples from a variety of different sports and in different populations to illustrate the role of physiological factors in exercise and sporting performance;
  3. Understand and be able to administer and apply the physiological testing procedures currently available to measure a range of physiological parameters relating to exercise and sport performance.
  4. Generic skills:
  • Communication
  • Information literacy and numeracy
  • Problem solving
  • Effective workplace skills

Prerequisites[edit]

Schedule[edit]

13 Weeks. Two one hour lectures per week, and one two hour practical tutorials per week.

Please feel free to add links and resources to the following topics:

Unit Introduction[edit]

  • Literature review, stats & graphs
  • Course structure
  • Assessment guidelines
  • No practical

Physiology of endurance activity[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Skill acquisition and estimating VO2[edit]

  • Practical
  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Assessing endurance activity[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Skill acquisition and estimating VO2[edit]

  • Practical
  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Training and adaptations in endurance activity[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Submaximal aerobic assessment[edit]

  • Practical
  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Special considerations for endurance activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Maximal aerobic assessment[edit]

  • Practical
  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Physiology of strength, power and speed activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Lactate responses[edit]

  • Practical
  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Assessment of strength, power and speed activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Report writing[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Literature Reviews[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Training and adaptations in strength, power and speed activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Sub-maximal & maximal aerobic assessment + lactate + core temp[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Special considerations for strength, power and speed activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Sub-maximal & maximal aerobic assessment + lactate + core temp[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Physiology of intermittent activities Lab based assessments[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Assessment of intermittent activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Lab based assessments[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Training and adaptations in intermittent activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Special considerations for intermittent activities[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Review of lecture & lab material[edit]

  • Please feel free to add links and resources to this topic

Resources[edit]

Recommended Readings[edit]

  • Powers SK, Howley ET. (2009) Exercise Physiology: Theory and applications to fitness and performance 7th edition. McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. New York. [call number: QP301.P64 2009]
  • Astrand P-O, Rodahl K, Dahl H and Stromme S. (2003) Textbook of Work Physiology – Physiological Basis of Exercise. 4th Ed., Champaign, Il, Human Kinetics. [call number: QP301.A23 2003]
  • Wilmore, J.H., D.L. Costill, and Kenney, W.L., eds. (2008) Physiology of Sport and Exercise. 4th Ed., Champaign, IL, Human Kinetics. [call number: QP301.W6749 2008]
  • Plowman SA, Smith DL (2008) Exercise Physiology for health, fitness and performance (2nd ed). Baltimore, MD: Lipincott Williams and Wilkins. [call number: QP301.P585 2007]
  • Gore CJ. Physiological tests for elite athletes. Australian Sports Commission. Champaign, IL ; Leeds, U.K. : Human Kinetics, c2000. [call number: RC1225.P49 2000]

Assessment[edit]

  • Literature review 35%
  • Laboratory based assessment 35%
  • Final Exam 30%

In order to pass this unit, all assessment items must be attempted and achieve an overall pass grade.

Literature Review[edit]

Submit a literature review on a topic of interest relating to exercise physiology. The literature review should contain the following sections:

  1. Abstract – this brief paragraph should contain a brief statement about the purpose, methods, results, conclusions and clinical relavence.
  2. Introduction – this section should inform the reader what the review is about and why it is important.
  3. Body – this section will “tell the story” and expand upon the information outlined in the introduction. This should be referenced (without the use of quotes). Technical writing is objective, concise and accurate. Avoid long and complex sentences, single sentence paragraphs and excessively long paragraphs. Remember that the first sentence of each paragraph usually states the main idea or topic being discussed. It is expected that the paragraph then goes onto expand and develop the idea. Make sure that the sentences flow.
  4. Conclusion – this section summaries what you have reviewed. There should be no “new” information. This section should reinforce the statements made in the introduction, real-world implications (or why is it important) or even future development/research.
  5. Reference in-text and list – use either APA referencing styles as (author, date) in text and the corresponding reference list in alphabetical order, or a numbered system. APA referencing style is used by the Journal of Sports Sciences, numbered referencing is used by Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. You may use a referencing tool such as Endnote or RefWorks – available free to students from the Library. Students must utilise at least 20 refereed journal articles

Further guideance on writing a literature review can be found at: http://learnonline.canberra.edu.au/mod/resource/view.php?inpopup=true&id=138000

The review should be no more than 2000 words (±10%).

The following rubric should be used as a guide for the marking criteria:

  • Does the title give you insight as to what the article is about? 1
  • Does the abstract contain a brief statement about the purpose, method, results, conclusion and clinical relevance? 1
  • Is the focus of the review clearly stated? 2
  • Logical flow of information: Introduction, main body text, final conclusion, appropriate use of sub-headings (if relevant), inclusion of relevant and labelled figures and tables, logical progression of information presented 4
  • Ability to address the assigned topic: comprehensive and concise coverage of topic. The topic was sufficiently researched & quality information is presented and is free of factual error and irrelevant material. 10
  • Implications for real-world setting: The implications for the target group are appropriate and are based on scientific evidence 4
  • Are alternative views acknowledged? 1
  • Are statements appropriately supported? 1
  • Are gaps in the literature identified? 1
  • At least 20 peer reviewed (journal) references used 2
  • Correct referencing used in reference list 2
  • Referencing within text: correct referencing used (author/date or number) 2
  • Use of effective writing: grammar, spelling, coherent writing, clear explanations, absence of typographical errors, paragraphs used in a clear way to support reading comprehension, correct capitalisation. 2
  • Assignment is an appropriate length (2,000 words) (+ or – 10%) and is an appropriate font and spacing used 2

Laboratory Assessment[edit]

The laboratory assessment will draw on skills attained in Physiology of Exercise 1 and Physiology of Exercise 2. Complete and present a case study to your peers and submit a report targeted towards a coach.

Oral presentation[edit]

A 7 minute presentation of your case study to your peers and maximum 3 minutes of questions. The case study must contain:

  1. an outline of the individual/group assessed (provided)
  2. explanation and justification of the physical assessments chosen for this individual/group
  3. results you might expect from this individual/group for the chosen assessments (you will be required to make-up realistic results based on demographics of the individual/group outlined in the case study)
  4. comparative data for each assessment relevant to your individual/group
  5. interpretation of the results
  6. conclusions and recommendations for the individual/group

The Oral presentation will be worth 20 marks. Fifteen marks from the unit convenor and 5 marks based on peer assessment. Each student will anonymously submit a mark out of 5 for the oral presentation given, which will be collated by the unit convenor and added to the unit convenors mark.

The following rubric should be used as a guide for the oral presentation marking criteria:

  • Introduction – relevant information provided in a concise manner 1
  • Appropriateness and explanation of number and types assessments chosen 2
  • Appropriate results and comparative data identified and presented in a concise easy to understand format 2
  • Interpretation of the results in a concise, easy to understand format 2
  • The appropriateness of your recommendations for the individual/group 3
  • Effective use of presentation aids i.e. PowerPoint 2
  • Presentation skills – clear, concise, confident, engaging the audience, within time limits 3

Written Report[edit]

This report must fit on one single A4 page (you may utilise both sides of paper), with font size 12 and margins of 2.54cm (standard margins). The report must contain:

  1. A brief introduction of the individual/group i.e. name, weight, height, sport, and reason for assessment
  2. Indication of the assessments undertaken and justification for the assessments carried out
  3. Results from one of the assessments and comparative data
  4. Interpretation of these findings
  5. Future recommendations for the individual/group

The written report will attract 15 marks. The following rubric should be used as a guide for the marking criteria:

  • Introduction – relevant information provided in a concise manner 1
  • Appropriateness of number and types assessments chosen 2
  • Explanation of assessments chosen 2
  • Appropriate results and comparative data identified and presented in a concise easy to understand format (maybe tabulated, graphed or written as text) 2
  • Interpretation of the results in a concise, easy to understand format 3
  • The appropriateness of your recommendations for the individual/group 3
  • Presentation (free of typographical errors, formatting, appropriate font and size) 2

Final Exam[edit]

The final exam will be comprehensive, and as such will test the student’s knowledge of material covered in all lectures and laboratories in this course. The exam will last for 3 hours and comprise of multiple choice and short answer questions. No learning resources (textbooks and lecture notes) are allowed in the exam. Non-programmable scientific calculators and unannotated non-electronic dictionary (English/Foreign) are permitted and a 2B pencil (to complete the computer answered sheets) and black/blue pen will be required to adequately complete the exam.

Workload[edit]

The amount of time you will need to spend on study in this unit is around 12 hours per week, for 13 weeks. This time will depend on a number of factors including your prior knowledge, learning skill level and learning style. In planning your time commitments you should note that for a 3cp unit such as this, the total notional workload over the semester or term is assumed to be 150 hours. These hours include time spent in classes.

Feedback[edit]

We welcome feedback and contributions to the development of this Unit. Please use the discussion page for feedback and suggestions.

Based on feedback on the unit received in 2009, the following modifications have been made to the unit:

  • The methods for assessing students work have altered and will now involve three different modalities of assessment: a literature review, case study and exam. These vastly different methods of assessing will ensure all students have the opportunity to excel in this subject.
  • Laboratory format has changed to enhance team work. All laboratory/tutorial sessions will involve problem solving in a team work environment on a weekly basis. Problem solving may be theory based for example case studies, or practically based for example operating fitness testing equipment.
  • Basic statistics will be reviewed in relation to laboratory work, and will be reviewed weekly to sharpen students analytical skills.
  • A problem based learning approach will be employed in many lectures and tutorials. This will enhance student’s problem-solving skills and assist with tackling and overcoming difficult and unfamiliar problems.
  • To further enhance the students written communication skills, a literature review and case study report have been included as assessment items.
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