PCP HIV AIDS Toolkit/Biology of HIV AIDS/Matching Game Template

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PCP HIV AIDS Toolkit Matching Game Template
This page is part of the PCP HIV AIDS Toolkit.

Template for The Matching Game Exercise[edit]

Terms and Definitions[edit]

Trainer's Note: These are for the matching game in Part III, Step 5. Copy enough to make a set of terms and a set of definitions for every six participants. Cut them out and make sets for each group.

Terms[edit]

LYMPHOCYTES
CD4 RECEPTORS
BACTERIA
T4-CELLS
VIRUSES
PATHOGEN
INFECTIOUS DISEASES
ANTIBODIES
ANTIGEN
RECEPTORS

Definitions[edit]

Microscopic single-celled organisms. Some can cause disease in humans by producing toxins that interact negatively with the body, for example: strep throat, tetanus, tuberculosis, and tooth decay.
Specialized molecules located on the surface of every cell that distinguishes one cell type from another. These enable a cell to communicate with the environment or other cells.
Specialized white blood cells involved in the immune response. The body has about two trillion of these. There are two major types: B cells and T cells.
Specific type of T-cell responsible for directing the body’s immune response against infection. This type of cell is the main target of HIV.
Diseases that can spread from one person to another and are caused by foreign organisms or substances that invade the body.
An antigen that causes disease.
Invades a living cell and forces it to make new copies of itself. They often damage or kill the cells they infect, causing disease and sometimes death. Very specific with regard to the types of cells they can enter and reproduce.
Produced by the immune system to attack specific antigens.
Any cell that does not originate in a person’s body. There are millions of examples, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc.
The type of receptor that enables the HIV virus to bind to and enter cells. The T4 cell has many of these receptors.

Answer Key for Trainer[edit]

Lymphocytes Specialized white blood cells involved in the immune response. The body has about two trillion of these. There are two major types: B cells and T cells.
Receptors Specialized molecules located on the surface of some cells that distinguishes one cell type from another. These enable a cell to communicate with the environment or other cells.
CD4 Receptors The type of receptor that enables the HIV virus to bind to and enter cells. The T4 cell has many of these receptors.
T4-cells Specific type of T-cell responsible for directing the body’s immune response against infection. This type of cell is the main target of HIV.
Bacteria Microscopic single-celled organisms. Some can cause disease in humans by producing toxins that interact negatively with the body, for example: strep throat, tetanus, tuberculosis, and tooth decay.
Antibodies Produced by the immune system to attack specific antigens.
Antigen Any cell that does not originate in a person’s body. There are millions of examples, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc.
Pathogen An antigen that causes disease.
Viruses Invade a living cell and force it to make new copies of itself. They often damage or kill the cells they infect, causing disease and sometimes death. Very specific with regard to the types of cells they can enter and reproduce.
Infectious Diseases Diseases that can spread from one person to another and are caused by foreign organisms or substances that invade the body.