Methane

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Discovery[edit]

Methane was first synthesized from carbon and hydrogen in 1904 by a Russian-American chemist, Vladimir Ipatiev (1867-1952).[1]

Properties[edit]

Methane is the major component of natural gas, about 87% by volume. At room temperature and standard pressure, methane is a colorless, odorless gas;[2] the smell characteristic of natural gas as used in homes is an artificial safety measure caused by the addition of an odorant, often methanethiol]] or ethanethiol. Methane has a boiling point of −161 °C (−257.8 °F) at a pressure of one Atmosphere (unit)|atmosphere.[3] As a gas it is flammable only over a narrow range of concentrations (5–15%) in air. Liquid methane does not burn unless subjected to high pressure (normally 4–5 atmospheres).[4]

Quick Facts[edit]

Name: Methane

Formula: CH4

Melting Point:

Boiling Point: -161.6 celsius

Appearance:

Molar Mass:

Shape: tetrahedryl

Reference[edit]

  1. [1]
  2. David A. Hensher, Kenneth J. Button (2003). Handbook of transport and the environment. Emerald Group Publishing. p. 168. ISBN 0080441033. http://books.google.com/books?id=yp3qEgHrsJ4C&pg=PA168. 
  3. NIST Chemistry Webbook
  4. Ayhan Demirbas (2010). Methane Gas Hydrate. Springer. p. 102. ISBN 1848828713. http://books.google.com/books?id=WFefWAq1Sh0C&pg=PA102. 

See Also[edit]