Aquaria/Reefkeeping

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The image shows a Sargassum Triggerfish. Credit: Cliff.

Reefkeeping, or reef-keeping and sometimes reef keeping, is a marine aquarist hobby of creating, maintaining, and actively sustaining a living captive reef, within an aquarium, complete with various life forms common to coral or other types of reefs.

Introduction[edit | edit source]

This is a reef aquarium in Monoco. Credit: Filip Maljkovic.

"An aquarium (plural aquariums or aquaria) is a clear-sided container in which water-dwelling plants and animals (usually fish, and sometimes invertebrates, as well as amphibians, marine mammals, and reptiles) are kept in captivity, often for public display; or it is an establishment featuring such displays."[1]

Audience[edit | edit source]

Scope[edit | edit source]

Science of Reefkeeping[edit | edit source]

In Nature[edit | edit source]

Physics[edit | edit source]

Light[edit | edit source]

Two light levels: photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, ~400-700 nm), PAR of 80 versus 180 µmol m-2 s-1 have been used to grow "crustose coralline algae (CCA), a desired group of benthic calcifying algae", on two "types of rock (initially bare coral rock and rock preconditioned for 12 weeks under low light)".[2]

"In general, pink CCA's developed more quickly than red CCA's, with 4.31-10.44% versus 2.45-4.56% cover after 9 weeks, respectively. Pink CCA grew more quickly on non-preconditioned rock; after 9 weeks of culture, pink CCA showed higher percentage cover and larger colony size on initially bare rock compared to preconditioned rock. In contrast, red CCA showed higher percentage cover and colony density on preconditioned rock. Although higher pink and red CCA colony densities were found at higher light intensity, no effect of irradiance was found on relative CCA cover. In addition, red CCA colony size was larger at the lowest irradiance, for both rock types."[2]

Temperature[edit | edit source]
Water Motion[edit | edit source]

Chemistry[edit | edit source]

Salt[edit | edit source]
Trace Elements[edit | edit source]
Nutrients[edit | edit source]

Biology[edit | edit source]

Food[edit | edit source]
Ecology[edit | edit source]

Physiology[edit | edit source]

Microlife[edit | edit source]

Bacteria[edit | edit source]
Plankton[edit | edit source]

Algae[edit | edit source]

Invertebrates[edit | edit source]

Cnidaria[edit | edit source]
Echinodermata[edit | edit source]
Crustaceans[edit | edit source]

Vertebrates[edit | edit source]

Fish[edit | edit source]
Zebrasoma desjardinii displays its soft dorsal and anal fins. Credit: Hectonichus.{{free media}}

The Aquarium[edit | edit source]

Introduction[edit | edit source]

Chemistry[edit | edit source]

Nitrogen[edit | edit source]
Phosphate[edit | edit source]
Calcium[edit | edit source]
Trace Elements[edit | edit source]

Physics[edit | edit source]

Light[edit | edit source]
Temperature[edit | edit source]
Water Motion[edit | edit source]

Ethics[edit | edit source]

Practical Reefkeeping[edit | edit source]

Introduction[edit | edit source]

General Rules[edit | edit source]

Equipment[edit | edit source]

Introduction[edit | edit source]

Materials[edit | edit source]

Glass[edit | edit source]
Wood[edit | edit source]
Sillicone[edit | edit source]
Plastics[edit | edit source]
Rubber[edit | edit source]
Coatings[edit | edit source]
Metal[edit | edit source]
Blacklisted[edit | edit source]
Ftalates[edit | edit source]
Metals[edit | edit source]

Tank[edit | edit source]

Stand[edit | edit source]

Sump[edit | edit source]

Plumbing[edit | edit source]

Lighting[edit | edit source]

Fluorescent[edit | edit source]
Metal Halide[edit | edit source]
LED[edit | edit source]

Water Movement[edit | edit source]

Pumps[edit | edit source]
Wavemakers[edit | edit source]
Dump[edit | edit source]

Temperature Control[edit | edit source]

Heating[edit | edit source]
Cooling[edit | edit source]

Filtering[edit | edit source]

Mechanical[edit | edit source]
Biological[edit | edit source]
Materials[edit | edit source]

Additives[edit | edit source]

Kalkwasser[edit | edit source]

Sterilization[edit | edit source]

UV[edit | edit source]
Ozone[edit | edit source]

Analysis[edit | edit source]

Introduction[edit | edit source]
Test Kits[edit | edit source]
pH[edit | edit source]
Nitrates[edit | edit source]
Phosphates[edit | edit source]
Calcium[edit | edit source]
Continuous[edit | edit source]
pH[edit | edit source]
Conductivity[edit | edit source]
Light[edit | edit source]
RedOx[edit | edit source]

Electronics[edit | edit source]

Timers[edit | edit source]
Safety[edit | edit source]

Other[edit | edit source]

Food Dispenser[edit | edit source]

Getting Started[edit | edit source]

Planning[edit | edit source]

Types[edit | edit source]
Fish Only[edit | edit source]
Nano[edit | edit source]
SPS[edit | edit source]
Mixed[edit | edit source]
Sizing[edit | edit source]
Examples[edit | edit source]

Equipment Setup[edit | edit source]

Purchasing[edit | edit source]
Building[edit | edit source]
Curing[edit | edit source]

Cycling[edit | edit source]

Algae Removal[edit | edit source]
Testing[edit | edit source]
Stocking[edit | edit source]
Animal Removal[edit | edit source]

Maintenance[edit | edit source]

Introduction[edit | edit source]

Daily[edit | edit source]

Topping Off[edit | edit source]
Inspection[edit | edit source]

Periodically[edit | edit source]

Testing[edit | edit source]
Water Changes[edit | edit source]
Cleaning[edit | edit source]

Annually[edit | edit source]

Holidays[edit | edit source]

Moving[edit | edit source]

Disaster[edit | edit source]

Animal Encounters[edit | edit source]

Pests[edit | edit source]

Crustaceans[edit | edit source]
Mantis Shrimp[edit | edit source]
Hermit Crabs[edit | edit source]
Algae[edit | edit source]

Disease[edit | edit source]

Itch[edit | edit source]

Equipment Failure[edit | edit source]

Leakage[edit | edit source]
Power Outage[edit | edit source]
Overheating[edit | edit source]

Other[edit | edit source]

pH low/high[edit | edit source]
Metal Poisoning[edit | edit source]

Propagation[edit | edit source]

Corals[edit | edit source]

Crustaceans[edit | edit source]

Crustaceans are arthropods. Their skeletons are on the outside of their bodies. Shrimp, crabs, lobsters, barnacles and hermit crabs are all crustaceans. Crustaceans have jointed body parts and often have many legs. Crustaceans have two pairs of antennae. Most crustaceans live in the sea and include animals, such as lobsters and crabs. Two types live on land – rolie polies, also known as isopods, pillbugs or sowbugs, and crayfish. Reference: About Crustaceans

Fish[edit | edit source]

Zebrasoma flavescens swims in an aquarium. Credit: Federico Candoni.{{free media}}
This Mandarinfish (Synchiropus splendidus) is in Muséum Liège (Belgium) aquarium. Credit: Luc Viatour.{{free media}}

Dragonets such as the Mandarinfish on the left are bottom-dwelling fish that constantly hunt tiny invertebrates for food, but in an aquarium most starve to death unless a refugium or place for the invertebrates to reproduce safely without any fish being able to reach them is provided.[3][4]

Related Topics[edit | edit source]

Resources[edit | edit source]

Reefkeeping[edit | edit source]

Biology[edit | edit source]

Aquarium Photography[edit | edit source]

Manufacturers[edit | edit source]

Future[edit | edit source]

Basic science[edit | edit source]

Physics[edit | edit source]

Light[edit | edit source]
The Spectrum[edit | edit source]
Intensity[edit | edit source]
Absorption[edit | edit source]

Hydrodynamics[edit | edit source]

Pressure[edit | edit source]

Temperature[edit | edit source]

Chemistry[edit | edit source]

Basics[edit | edit source]
pH[edit | edit source]
RedOx[edit | edit source]
Calcium[edit | edit source]

Physiology[edit | edit source]

Methodology[edit | edit source]

Introduction[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Stonda (19 April 2005). Aquarium. San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2014-09-05.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Robin de Vries, Tim Wijgerde, Michaël Laterveer (09 December 2015). "Effects of rock preconditioning and irradiance on growth of crustose coralline algae in aquaculture". Advanced Aquarist's Online Magazine (Reefkeeping South Africa). http://www.reefkeeping.co.za/Advanced_Aquarist_s_Online_Magazine/2015/12/09/Feature_Study:_Effects_of_rock_preconditioning_and_irradiance_on_growth_of_crustose_coralline_algae_in_aquaculture. Retrieved 2017-09-20. 
  3. "Mandarins, Psychedelic "Gobies", Dragonets, Scooter Blennies....YAH! Family Callionymidae". Retrieved 2008-12-18.
  4. "...I'd like to buy a Mandarin!".