Linux

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If you are interested in learning how to install a particular Linux distribution, visit the Installation page.

This project is meant to help people understand how the internals of Linux work. By studying the learning materials here you will hopefully come away with a better understanding of source code, programming, Linux, the history of Linux (e.g. History of the Linux kernel), operating systems, and probably other things that only thorough reflection upon the experience can glean.

Contributors[edit]

  • Sjohnson 16:52, 23 August 2007 (UTC) (I'd like to help out by contributing some of my knowledge.)
  • JimD (Mostly working on the Linux kernel source code study guide (below)).
  • CQ Working with BSD also.
  • robertparten Contributing to a fair and concise understanding on how to use Linux and explaining the similarities and differences to other Operating Systems

Linux feature requests[edit]

Have a program, perhaps an executable that can be run to see if Linux will 'just work' on one's system. This executable could check someone's hardware against a database of drivers perhaps. One could also selectively input peripherals to check or even create a hypothetical system to check. --Remi 16:33, 26 October 2007 (UTC)

^^ Already completed. Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron (Live CD Version) shipped with a hardware checker that will test your computers compatibility with Ubuntu/Linux. -Germ

But an application that someone can easily install on Windows without having to reboot could be useful. --Devourer09 17:27, 22 August 2008 (UTC)
I think Wubi is an application that can do this. They ought to use more mirrors, presuming its not a specialized version of Ubuntu. Emesee 18:43, 22 August 2008 (UTC)

Live CD[edit]

A Live CD is a CD which contains a ready-to-use, fully operational copy (called an image) of a version of the Linux operating system. The CD is used to boot the computer in place of the hard drive. Due to the fact that this method does not touch the contents of the hard disk, it is a popular way to test out a new operating system. It will not make any permanent alterations to the system. Usually these Live CDs have installer programs so that if you like what the live CD contains, you can install it on your hard disk by clicking on a link. However, one must click through a fair amount of warning messages before anything is overwritten on the hard disk. See the List of live CDs at Wikipedia.

Virtualization[edit]

You can also run two OS's simultaneously on the same machine. For example, you can install VirtualBox onto your windows or mac system, and then install whatever OS you want into the VirtualBox environment (each install takes up disk space, and the number that you can run at once is limited by RAM - a good graphical linux can run just fine on 256MB, and run a little bit slower on half that). There are other virtualization options: Xen, VMware, etc...

Cross Training[edit]

I'm a big proponent of cross-training. Let's face it, Windows is the big dog, but many other professionals like me relish the idea of developing Linux skills.I'm using a Ubuntu client now. Were I better trained and skilled,I would start deploying Linux servers, then move on to pure Ubuntu networks. I'm comfortable at the PROMPT, so that's not a big deal. We need more correlative training resources,clearly directing Windows trained IT professions to the Linux OS/distros and feature rich tutorials,so we can learn and mature,then move to the shell and exploit Linux diversities.

Please clearly define all acronyms so others can interpret the material with ease

Content to study[edit]

Topic:Linux


External materials[edit]

Linux Professional Institute[edit]

The Linux Professional Institute is an institute which is committed to the development of a global standard in Linux certification. Individuals and organisations wishing to be certified in the use of Linux systems can enroll in courses which meet the requirements of both IT professionals and the organizations that seek to employ people with skills and experience in using, administering and programming on open source distributions. The LPI seeks to be distribution neutral and aims to provide the highest quality resources in order to educate and certify people in the use of Linux distributions.

The LPI provides 3 levels of certification:

Along with the above 3 levels of certification the LPI also provides a certification in partnership with NOVELL: Novell Certificate of Linux Administration

[Wikipedia LPI]

Additional resources[edit]

External links[edit]