JCCAP FDF/2019

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Addresses[edit | edit source]

Future Directions Address 1: "Future Directions in Adversity and Mental Health"[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Kate McLaughlin, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

In Dr. Katie McLaughlin's Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms Linking Childhood Adversity with Psychopathology Across the Life-Course address, she discusses research on the links between adverse early experiences and mental health, with a particular emphasis on the developmental mechanisms linking childhood adversity to the onset of psychopathology.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the address here.

Future Directions Address 2: "Future Directions in Mediators of Treatment"[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Philip Kendall, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

How do psychological therapies work? How can we enhance treatment to improve outcomes? Questions of mediation lie at the heart of these inquiries. In this address, Dr. Philip Kendall delineates some of the issues confronting tests of treatment mediation in youth mental health and suggests future directions in research on addressing these issues.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the address here.

Future Directions Address 3: "Future Directions in Immunology and Mental Health"[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Greg Miller, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

In this address, Dr. Gregory Miller provides an overview of the recently developed neuroimmune network hypothesis and highlights implications and future directions for theory and empirical research on early-life stress and its links with physical and emotional health problems.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the address here.

Future Directions Address 4: "Future Directions in Parent-Child Separation"[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Kathryn Humphreys, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

In this address, Dr. Kate Humphreys reviews salient emerging themes in the scientific literature related to the study and treatment of parent-child separation.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the address here.

Workshops[edit | edit source]

Strategies for Improving Writing Clarity[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Andres De Los Reyes, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

People tend to be drawn to and understand information best when it is communicated to them in the form of a narrative or “story” rather than a list of facts. However, researchers rarely receive formal training on leveraging narrative tools when writing about their academic work. In this workshop, we describe evidence-based strategies for applying narrative structure to academic work, with a focus on preparing a manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed academic journal.

Job Options in Academia[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Susan White, Ph.D and Dr. Matthew Lerner, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

Graduate training in fields relevant to child and adolescent mental health (e.g., Education, Psychiatry, Psychology, and Social Work) prepares trainees for careers in a variety of policy, research, and practice settings. How does a trainee learn about these opportunities and maximize their chances for landing jobs in one or more of these settings? We will provide attendees with a broad overview of the job options available in academia, with a specific focus on strategies for crafting the training and scholarly records that make someone a compelling candidate for these job options.

Preparing a Training Grant[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Deborah A.G. Drabick, Ph.D. and Dr. Tara Peris, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

Submitting a training grant involves considering multiple factors that focus on not only a proposed study but also a concrete plan for developing the skills needed to execute this study. By construction, these applications carry many expectations, requirements, and complicated forms. In this workshop, we leverage our years of experience with extramural funding to clarify the process of submitting a training grant, and provide attendees with concrete tools for submitting successful training grant applications.

Responding to Peer Review[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Andres De Los Reyes, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

You have successfully mastered use of “story” when writing a manuscript, now how do you get it published? Publishing articles involves submitting scholarly manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. A key component of publishing manuscripts involves receiving commentary about your work from peers in your field, and satisfactorily responding to such commentary. Yet, researchers rarely receive formal training on responding to peer review commentary. In this workshop, we describe evidence-based strategies for responding to peer review commentary, including strategies for how to compose cover letters for responding to such commentary.

Job Search and Negotiation[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Deborah A.G. Drabick, Ph.D. and Dr. Tara Peris, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

Do you plan to “go on the market” soon? Where is the best place online to search for job openings? How do you write your cover letter? Where do you find resources to assist you in preparing for the job interview? And when you get that job offer, how do you advocate for yourself and negotiate the right salary, benefits, and/or lab startup package? We leverage our extensive experience on “both sides” of job searches and negotiations to provide attendees with winning strategies for working their way through this multifaceted process.

Preparing a Grant Post-Ph.D[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Joshua Langberg, Ph.D. and Dr. Susan White, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

Submitting your first grant as a Ph.D. can appear on the surface to be a daunting task, with many expectations, requirements, and complicated forms. In this workshop, we leverage years of experience with extramural funding to explain the grant submission process, and provide attendees with concrete tools for submitting successful applications via multiple post-Ph.D. mechanisms, including project grants and K Series applications.

Strategies for Developing a Research Program[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Andres De Los Reyes, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

Our first two writing workshops dealt with applying narrative tools to academic work and responding to peer review commentary, with the key goal of publishing a single journal article. How might you use these tools to connect separate articles together into a larger story? In research, our larger stories are the “research programs” we build from years of work and multiple articles. These are the stories we take with us “on the road” when interviewing for jobs and applying for grants. In this workshop, we discover how narrative devices commonly used in filmmaking actually help us weave related but distinct articles together into the “story” of an entire body of work.

Networking at Conferences[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Deborah A.G. Drabick, Ph.D. and Dr. Matthew Lerner, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

To an early career scientist, attending professional meetings can be an overwhelming experience, with many opportunities to not only learn new things but also connect with like-minded scholars in the field. In this workshop, we demystify the process of networking at conferences, and provide attendees with concrete tools for developing and maintaining professional relationships with conference attendees.

Work-Life Balance[edit | edit source]

Presented by Dr. Joshua Langberg, Ph.D. and Dr. Sarah Racz, Ph.D.

Description[edit | edit source]

Sometimes it feels like everyone in our field is “always on task” and unable to “unplug”. But is that a realistic view of how we balance our work lives with our lives outside of work? In this workshop, we discuss the competing demands placed on us across our various work, family, and social spheres; and strategies to manage these demands in the necessary pursuit of healthy, balanced lives.

Ceremony for the Future Directions Launch Award[edit | edit source]

John L. Cooley[edit | edit source]

  • Received Ph.D. from the University of Kansas
About the award recipient[edit | edit source]

John is a recipient of the 2019 Future Directions Launch Award in Adversity.  After receiving his Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology from University of Kansas in 2018, he worked as a Post-Doctoral Fellow through the Developmental Psychobiology Research Group in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. He is currently a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Texas Tech University, where his lab is guided by two overarching questions: “Why are some children and adolescents more impacted by peer victimization than others?" and "How can we address the mental health needs of peer-victimized youth?" More specifically, my lab is focused on investigating a) factors that influence risk for peer victimization and its associated negative outcomes, b) methods for identifying victims of peer aggression in need of intervention, and c) prevention and intervention approaches.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the remarks here.

Erin Kang[edit | edit source]

  • Ph.D. Candidate at Stony Brook University at the time of the award
About the award recipient[edit | edit source]

Erin received the 2019 Future Directions Launch Award in Treatment. She earned her Ph.D. Clinical Psychology at Stony Brook University under the mentorship of Dr. Matthew Lerner. She is currently a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Montclair State University, where her lab lab focuses on understanding how the processing of social information shapes, and is shaped by, social experience in youth with ASD and related developmental disorders. This focus on social plasticity, or capacity to learn from and adapt to their complex social environments, includes the role of social environment, affective processing, and neural plasticity that underlie this capacity.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the remarks here.

Nicole Lorenzo[edit | edit source]

  • Ph.D. candidate at Florida International University at the time of the award
About the award recipient[edit | edit source]

Nicole received the 2019 Future Directions Launch Award in Treatment.  After receiving her Ph.D. in Clinical Science at Florida International University in 2019, she is currently a postdoctoral fellow at University of Maryland, College Park. Her research focuses on early intervention and the relation between parenting (including parenting practices and parental psychopathology) on early childhood social-emotional and behavioral problems. A secondary line of research is early childhood emotion development, including emotion expression, emotion regulation, and emotion socialization, as well as difficulties in early childhood prosocial behavior and disruptive behaviors. The goal of these research avenues is to aid in the early identification of at-risk children, with the ultimate goal of informing targeted early intervention efforts leveraging parents to improve children’s social-emotional outcomes.

Watch the YouTube video recording of the remarks here.