Greek Language/Diphthongs

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According to linguistics, a diphthong is defined as the structure consisted of two vowels, which are pronounced as two phthongs but in the time of one syllable. In modern Greek there are 7 diphthongs, presented in the following table.


Diphthongs
Pronunciation
Notes
αϊ
[ai]
Pronounced like mine or iron.
αη
Pronounced the same as αϊ.
αϋ
Pronounced the same as αϊ.
οϊ
[oi]
Pronounced like moist or oyster.
οη
Pronounced the same as οϊ.
οϋ
Pronounced the same as οϊ.
εϋ
[ei]
Pronounced like main or same.


You may have noticed that most diphthongs look alike to the two-vowels vowels and combinations ευ and αυ. However, they are distinguished by the fact that over ι and υ there are special signs, similar to the Umlaut of German language. These signs are called diaeresis (Greek: διαλυτικά) and are always used to separate a vowels' digraph, having as a result the independent pronunciation of each vowel the digraph is consisted of.