Automated Feedback and Interactions: Interactions with Automated Feedback

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Automated Feedback and Interactions[edit]

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Interactions without Automated Feedback[edit]

Click-to-Reveal Tabs, Accordions, Carousels[edit]

Interactions in this category are designed to reduce cognitive load on the learner. By hiding text behind categories that must be clicked to reveal what’s behind it, it can help diminish the amount of on-screen text. It also helps categorize data sets that are usually set in numbered or bulleted lists. In the example below, clicking the icon of a lipstick revealed the text.


Example of an Accordion Click-to-Reveal



The other types of click-to-reveal include tabs, accordions, and carousels, which all function in a similar way but are arranged differently. The sample below shows horizontal tabs, and each heading can be a category with text underneath. Many times, images can be added for further illustration.

Example of a Tab Click-to-Reveal


Hotspot[edit]

Hotspot interactions are highly software dependent. Generally, the concept is to click somewhere within an image to get more information. Some authoring tools allow automated feedback in an assessment format, where the user clicks somewhere in the image to identify something. Hotspots can be used to illustrate diagrams, art, architecture, etc., but should be used sparingly because it can be resource heavy.

Example of a Hotspot


Others (Software-Specific)[edit]

Certainly this list is not an exhaustive inventory of all types of interactivity within e-learning courses. Using different programming scripts, an advanced instructional designer can create custom interactions. Some e-learning tools have unique animations and ability for the learner to work within a course. Research different authoring systems to learn more.

Knowledge Check[edit]

It's that time again! Be sure to answer all questions before clicking submit.

1

Which of the following is NOT an example of an automated feedback interaction type?

Click-to-reveal
Multiple-choice
Flash card/Card flip
Matching

2

Which of the following would be an example of automated feedback?

Upon clicking on a hotspot for tomatoes in a garden map image, Erica is provided with information on the growth of tomatoes.
Upon clicking on the definition of mulch, a drop down (accordian) box appears below giving the definition.
Upon selecting a multiple choice answer in an online e-learning quiz about tomato growth, Erica receives an on-screen response congratulating her on her correct choice.
Upon selecting a multiple choice answer in an online e-learning quiz about tomato growth, Erica is prompted to do the next question without any comment on her answer choice.

3

Choose the correct response to fill blank: "Hotspots can be used to illustrate diagrams, art, architecture, etc., but should be used _________ because it can be resource heavy."

Never
Frequently
Sparingly
Always


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