Wright State University Lake Campus/2016-9/Phy1050/log/j0031723

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9/27/16 Assignment: Lab activity on nuclear chemistry[edit]

Finally figured out how to post, Excel lab today and have taken all labs til this point and first exam

[[[Wikipedia:Uranium-238]]] uranium 238

[[[Wikipedia:Zippe-type centrifuge]]]- nuclear centrifuge

===Came to class and learned wikitext18:16, 18 November 2016 (UTC)

feedback activity wed 16 (utc)[edit]

Today we are inserting an image into Wikipedia:Positive feedback

i made this

Exercise in pasting paper from Word into wikitext[edit]

extra credit essay based on housing bubble monday before thanksgiving
 The 2008 housing Bubble started back when the dot.com bubble burst. The federal reserve took treasury notes (T-bills) that they sell to business's  and dropped the interest rates down to one percent and investment banks would not buy these due to no profit. Outside foreign countries sent in capital to lend money out. How a mortgage works is the home buyer goes to a mortgage broker who goes to a lender who then sells the original mortgage to investment bankers who manage stocks, bonds, pension plans, hedge funds etc. They in turn bundle the mortgages into cdo's  and give them a rating in three categories. Safe, average, and risky giving out a percentage by ranking, safe would be 5% versus risky at 11%. The investment banker then sells the cdo's or rated mortgages to investors who are not worried because as long as the homeowner makes payments they make money. With the value of the house up, they can risk a default and still make money offloading the house based on its value. Here is where the problems are and creates a circle of good business (negative effect) to a circle of bad business (positive effect). With T-bills low and plenty of foreign money flooding in the circle of people (brokers, banks, and investors) decided to expand home loans to not so secure home loans and even stop asking for a down payment by simply adding on the interest making investors more happy on the return rate. Selling prime mortgages made money, now selling sub-prime mortgages should bring in more money and add in more houses which make more payment money coming in, specially the higher interest rated sub-prime mortgages.
 The sub-prime mortgage people bought houses that they could not afford and started to default on their loans. This in turn made the banks foreclose and re-sell the house. Simple enough, but the rate which defaulting was happening created to many houses for sale over time and lending banks could not offload the houses because they had to many defaulted loans. Investment bankers were stuck not being able to offload houses or sell any more cdo's because they became a bad investment. Investors were also stuck with houses to offload and would not buy anymore cdo's because they had to many houses to offload. The banks, investment banks, and investors all borrowed money to make this happen. Not enough money coming in and they could not re-pay their loans due to de-faulted houses they could not re-sell. The supply and demand in the housing market flipped with to many houses on the market and the mad scramble to sell cheap was ordered. This sent the value of all houses down, hurting the people who had prime mortgages, thus creating the housing bubble. The other people who had their pensions, stocks, bonds, etc. in with the investment bankers were losing money due to the sub-prime mortgages failing because that is what investment bankers invested in for them hurting the people and businesses who put their retirement plans and investments into the housing section. --edit performed by instructor b/c student placed it in the course log--Guy vandegrift (discusscontribs) 17:38, 24 November 2016 (UTC)

Exercise in pasting paper from Word into wikitext[edit]

extra credit essay based on housing bubble monday before thanksgiving
 The 2008 housing Bubble started back when the dot.com bubble burst. The federal reserve took treasury notes (T-bills) that they sell to business's  and dropped the interest rates down to one percent and investment banks would not buy these due to no profit. Outside foreign countries sent in capital to lend money out. How a mortgage works is the home buyer goes to a mortgage broker who goes to a lender who then sells the original mortgage to investment bankers who manage stocks, bonds, pension plans, hedge funds etc. They in turn bundle the mortgages into cdo's  and give them a rating in three categories. Safe, average, and risky giving out a percentage by ranking, safe would be 5% versus risky at 11%. The investment banker then sells the cdo's or rated mortgages to investors who are not worried because as long as the homeowner makes payments they make money. With the value of the house up, they can risk a default and still make money offloading the house based on its value. Here is where the problems are and creates a circle of good business (negative effect) to a circle of bad business (positive effect). With T-bills low and plenty of foreign money flooding in the circle of people (brokers, banks, and investors) decided to expand home loans to not so secure home loans and even stop asking for a down payment by simply adding on the interest making investors more happy on the return rate. Selling prime mortgages made money, now selling sub-prime mortgages should bring in more money and add in more houses which make more payment money coming in, specially the higher interest rated sub-prime mortgages.
 The sub-prime mortgage people bought houses that they could not afford and started to default on their loans. This in turn made the banks foreclose and re-sell the house. Simple enough, but the rate which defaulting was happening created to many houses for sale over time and lending banks could not offload the houses because they had to many defaulted loans. Investment bankers were stuck not being able to offload houses or sell any more cdo's because they became a bad investment. Investors were also stuck with houses to offload and would not buy anymore cdo's because they had to many houses to offload. The banks, investment banks, and investors all borrowed money to make this happen. Not enough money coming in and they could not re-pay their loans due to de-faulted houses they could not re-sell. The supply and demand in the housing market flipped with to many houses on the market and the mad scramble to sell cheap was ordered. This sent the value of all houses down, hurting the people who had prime mortgages, thus creating the housing bubble. The other people who had their pensions, stocks, bonds, etc. in with the investment bankers were losing money due to the sub-prime mortgages failing because that is what investment bankers invested in for them hurting the people and businesses who put their retirement plans and investments into the housing section. --edit performed by instructor b/c student placed it in the course log--Guy vandegrift (discusscontribs) 17:38, 24 November 2016 (UTC)


Final Report

Jason Scheer English 2100 April 15, 2016


Adolescents, New Age Technology, and Problems


Today’s young adolescents live in a forever changing world of new technology. New age technology has advanced due to the creators’ ability to improve the internet and connecting people to the World Wide Web. We can now text at a click of a button, take our own photos and edit them, make a film within a few hours, get directions at a few clicks, buy or sell anything, and create a whole new social platform of social interaction. And not just within one block radius or a small area, but across the globe. For the purposes of this paper, the term "digital technology," is used for the terms encompassing all screen monitors, gadgets, laptops, cell phones, or anything digital with a screen that allows young adolescents to watch and interact with. With the advancements of new age technology, problems have arisen. Internet addiction, new age communication, brain development, emotional health, and decline of physical health are just a few. “Men have become the tools of their tools” wrote Henry David Thoreau in his 1854 book Walden. The same can be said today about men, women, and especially young adolescents (qtd. in Goldsborough 7). There has not been any advancement that has stood out more than texting at this point in time for new age communication to where it is the vernacular of the day. According to Dokoupil, texting or "text speak," or “text acronymic vernacular,” has diversified texting into the everyday use of children as the primary form of communication. He also states that the average teen processes 3,700 texts a month (Dokoupil, 12). Teens also have acquired a new kind of shorthand with special acronyms such as: OMG = Oh my God; LOL = Laugh out Loud; and BRB = be right back; LMBO=Laugh my butt off. Children’s grammatical form with texting is to abbreviate and write shortened, grammatically incorrect sentences. Young adolescents are communicating with others and illustrates that they can adapt to interpersonal skills. Although young adolescents can communicate and adapt, there are some pit falls like cell phones play a significant role in adolescents distracted driving (Jacobson, Cara, et al. 187). All State Foundation, in 2009, found that 83 percent of teenagers reported using a cell phone while driving (Jacobson, Cara, et al. 187). The same 2009 study revealed that texting was found to increase the risk of a car accident by 23 times, creating a dangerous driving condition (Jacobson, Cara, et al.). Texting has created a new phrase called, "the flight from conversation,” which states that texting helps avoid face to face communication causing young adolescents to not pick up on facial expressions, tone of voice, or body language that they would if they had a face to face conversation giving adolescents the inability to understand "emotional consequences" (Farber 1226). Actor and comedian, Steve Carell, at the commencement speech in 2012 at Princeton University describing his dilemma and feelings on texting and face to face communication said, “When I was in college, I wouldn't "text" a girl to ask her out on a date. I would ask her, in person. One human being to another. And when she said "no," which she always did, I would suffer the humiliation and self- loathing that a young man needs for his, or her, personal growth" (qtd in Farber 1225). It could just be a fear or being "old fashioned," but for those "born digital," the experience of closeness can occur in texting and the choice of words. Even absent tonal quality and body language can convey powerful and interpersonal messages allowing for endless opportunities for connection. Even though texting is a huge problem, one bigger developing issue is internet addiction. The term "Computer Addiction" has been around at least since the personal computer began in the 1970s and early 1980s. The term "Internet Addiction Disorder," or IAD, has been around at least since the mid-1990s, when the Web started becoming mainstream. In the twentieth century Internet Addiction Disorder was suggested by New York City psychiatrist Ivan Goldberg as a joke, parodying the bevy of new psychiatric conditions that had been recently recognized by the American Psychiatric Association (Goldsborough 7). Goldberg mocked the idea of how a person could be addicted to the internet or use of the internet constitutes Internet Disorder with education and work taking up a majority of the time. "Use of technology is essential to make the tasks of life easier; however it's abnormal, excessive, and unnecessary, use leads to addiction and makes life more difficult." (Agarwal & Kumar 170) Based on work and education the excess downtime away from the requirements makes life choices harder to spend the excess downtime away from technology. The further state that “Another way to defining technology addiction is - a habitual and compulsive way of indulgence with technology and deviating from meeting the life's issues" (Agawar & Kumar 171). Many people enjoy getting on the internet to watch movies, connect through social media, buy and sell products, play games, or do various other things. Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project Poll 2011 states that, "93% of teens use or have Facebook" (qtd in. Farber 1225). This shows that a lot of young adolescents are using the internet at some point in their daily lives. Yoo and his team states, “The internet is highly addictive, and it can be abused by anyone” (Yoo, et al 193). Adolescents have a high probability of indulging in obscene materials or games on the internet, as they tend to have more curiosity than self-control (Yoo, et al. 193). Internet addiction attacks those who are younger due to the fact they do not have enough wisdom to stop. “The internet’s remarkable growth of internet consumption is paired inextricably with the rise of its excessive use creating a dysfunctional user involving a loss sense of time while on-line and developing a growing need to be connected more often for longer periods of time” (Lortie 1207). Increased isolation in reality results in negative outcomes. Yoo and his team states that Young adolescents are isolating themselves more and more. "Internet addiction generally causes depression, anxiety, and a sense of isolation, thus a considerable number of individuals with IA experience stress and exhibit low self-esteem” (Yoo, et al.193). However, further research in cognitive and longitudinal studies need to be done. With the advancements in new age technology and the amount of time spent using it, we do not know the full impact on the development of the brain. Young adolescents use the pre-frontal cortex as the main functioning and decision making processor of the brain. Pederson states that, “As young adolescents mature their pre-frontal cortices are developing, the amygdala which is the reactionary impulse part of the lower brain, gets more receptiveness. The amygdala triggers the fight, flight, or freeze reactions versus higher logical thinking” (102). In brain studies, young adolescent’s brains are scanned while solving an emotional problem, causing the amygdala to light up which shows an impulsive reaction. In adults, when presented with the same emotional problem during a brain scan, the frontal lobe section of their brain lights up meaning they are thinking through a problem and making a rational decision (Pederson 103). Most of our interaction with new age technology activates the left brain and does not stimulate the right brain. Texting, for instance, stimulates only one side of the brain to the detriment of children. Since the left brain is linear, it does not take in the “whole” of who you are interacting with (Siegel 2). Internet addiction is related to “microstructural changes in adolescent brains,” such as decreased gray matter volume. Genetic polymorphisms, impairment of neuro-transmitter systems, and anatomic and functional changes have been found in brains of individuals with internet addiction (Jacobson et al. 184). The brain develops with stimulation given to us, which stimulates neurons unraveling allowing genes to create structural change, called “neuro plasticity.” If someone spends seven hours or more in front of a screen or non-verbal interaction time, they are using the left brain to think out linguistic information, but the right brain is passive (Siegel 2). With all the tests and studies being done there is not any causality and further longitudinal research is needed. New age technology has made our lives easier. Sadly, emotional health issues are coming from young adolescent’s from the use of new age technology that starting to appear more and more. Dr. Rosen believes that digital technology coerces us to act in a way “that may be detrimental to our mental wellbeing” (Rosen 142). Checking your emails, messages, or constantly checking your smartphone can lead to obsessive-compulsive disorder creating to what Dr. Rosen refers to as “cyberchondiacs” (Rosen 142). In one brain study, Dr. Rosen explores that he calls the “google effect,” is considered to be the inability to remember facts brought on by the realization that they are all available simply by looking them up on Google (Rosen 202). In Dr. Rosens book, iDisorders, he writes about corresponding psychiatric disorders with new age technology including: narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), addiction, depression, bi-polarity, attention deficit disorder (ADHD), hypochondriasis, eating disorders, paranoid schizophrenia, and voyeurism. At the end of each chapter, Dr. Rosen does propose helpful suggestions of actions to take to counteract the propensity of these disorders. Our range of expression is constrained by our new age technology to where we are not intimately connected or happy anymore. Youth who play a lot of video games, particularly first-person shooter games, tend to have diminished empathy (Rosen 183). The association of depressive symptoms was consistent with the findings of Schimit et al.’s study. The subjects with online video game dependency spent longer hours per week playing games, had higher scores for loneness or isolation, higher scores for depression, lower scores for self-esteem and reduced ability to cope with emotional problems compared with those without dependency (Wei 5). The more use of new age technology stands clear if it is gaming to constant need for communication the direct instant gratification of having there is leading young adolescents to sustain emotional problems. Chronic emotional problems can lead into physical ailments. These ailments can begin minor consequences, but later turn into problematic ailments. New age technology has not been helpful or beneficial to the human body, but has created physical problems. Wei states that, “For the association of online gaming hours and somatic/pain symptoms, it might be explained that excessive game-playing leaded to muscle soreness, dry eyes, sleep deprivation, inadequate exercising, and even changes in dietary habits” (Wei 5). Many adolescents will spend countless hours playing their favorite video game from Friday up to late, Sunday night right up to the Monday, morning school bell. The exposure to an ever creative new age device, game, or communication device is allowing young adolescents to overuse and fall prey to long hours of new age technology. “Excessive use of electronic media is reported to be associated with long-lasting adverse effects on health like obesity, or lack of regular exercise, or unspecific symptoms like tiredness, stress, concentration difficulties and sleep disturbances” (Milde-Busch et al. 1). Lack of sleep might seem minute, but it can bring major, physical health problems. Rosen states that, “Nearly every health problem or concern can be brought on or exacerbated by inadequate sleep: from obesity, to aggression, to hyperactivity. The brain needs sleep time to shut down and restore. The bottom line is that most young adolescents are not getting enough sleep along with adults, and sleep is essential” (Rosen 214). New age technology is essential to our modern, everyday life. Our government, schools, commerce, and personal lives depends on it being at our finger tips. Adolescents use different types of gadgets such as cell phones, tablets, and laptops for activities such as communication, entertainment, and shopping. The invention of these new age technologies have made our lives easier and helpful, but it is the overuse and out of control usage that we must notice and acknowledge. “Young adolescents are not mature enough to understand adverse effects associated with excessive use of these things and they are easily likely to be hooked to modern technologies” (Agawar & Kumar 170). People such as parents, guardians, and doctors all play a crucial role in protecting these young children of tomorrow. We must inform the youth of today of the effects of long-term usage of technology, and teach them how to limit it. There has to be balance in the use and having common information to share with the general public showing problems and what to look for and allow for preventive measures.













Work Cited


Agarwal, Vivek, and Suijit Kumar Kar. “Technology Addiction in Adolescents.” Journal of Indian Association for Child & Adolescent Mental Health 11. 3(2015):170-174. Academic Search Complete. Web. 3 March 2016.

Dokoupil, Tony. “Tweets, Texts, Email, Post: Is the Onslaught Making Us Crazy?” Newsweek 7 July 2012: 24-30. Print

Farber, Barry A., “Children, Technology, Problems, and Preferences.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 68.11 (2012): 1225-1229. PsycInfo. Web 19 Feb. 2016

Goldsborough, R. “Loving Our Devices Too Much.” Tech Directions 74(2015) 6-7. Vocational and Career Collection. Web. 16 Feb. 2016

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. “Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18- Year Olds.” Menlo Park: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Jan. 2010. PDF.

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. “Children’s Media Use and Sleep Problems: Issues and Unanswered Questions.” Menlo Park: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Jan. 2009. PDF.

Jacobson, Cara, et al. “Adolescent Health Implications of New Age Technology.” Current Opinion in Pediatrics 26.5 (n.d.) 605-619. Science Citation Index. Web. 16 Feb. 2016

Lenhart, Amanda, et al. “Teens and Social Media.” Washington, D.C.: Pew Internet & American Life Project, 17 Dec. 2007. PDF.

Lortie, Catherine L., and Matthieu J. Guitton. “Internet Addiction Assessment Tools: Dimensional Structure and Methodological Status.” Addiction 108.7 (2013): 1207-1216. Cinahl. Web 18 Feb. 2016

Marche, Stephen. “Is Facebook Making Us Lonely? (Cover Story)." Atlantic 309.4 (2012): 60. MasterFILE Premier. Web. 15 Apr. 2016.

Milde-Busch Et Al. "The Association Between Use of Electronic Media and Prevalence of Headache in Adolescents: Results from a Population-basedcross-sectional Study." BMC Neurology 10 (2010): 12-21. Web. 16 Feb. 2016

Pederson, H. “Challenging Cyber Bullying: Tips and Strategies for Parents.” San Rafael: Marin Office of Education,16 May. 2012. PDF

Mustafa, Akdag & Cinigi. “The Impact of Internet and Social Media on Kids’ and Parents’ Game Habits.” Epihany 1(2014): 63-89. Humanities and International Complete. Web 19 Feb. 2016

Rosen, Larry D., Nancy A. Cheever, and L. Mark. Carrier. IDisorder: Understanding Our Obsession with Technology and Overcoming Its Hold on Us. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Print.

Siegel, Dan. "The Healthy Mind Platter." Mind Your Brain, Inc. 2010. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Wei, Han-Ting, Mu-Hong Chen, Po-Cheng Huang, and Ya-Mei Bai. "The Association Between Online Gaming, Social Phobia, and Depression: An Internet Survey." BMC Psychiatry 12.1 (2012): 92. Web. 16 Feb. 2016.

Yoo, et al.“Associations Between Overuse Of the Internet And Mental Health In Adolescents.” Nursing & Health Sciences 16.2 (2014): 193-200 8p. Web. 24 Feb. 2016

Talk page of Wikipedia:Positive feedback[edit]

Those present (18:48, 30 November 2016 (UTC)) helped with this.