User:Guy vandegrift/T/CourseDescriptions

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Wright State University Lake Campus/2019-1

MTH2310[edit]

Extended content

The exams cover the following sections of the textbook:

Test1: 1.7, 4.5, 5.6, G,, 5.7, 5.10
Test2: 6.1, 6.2,6.3, 6.4,6.6
Test3: 8.1, 8.2,, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 8.7
Test4: 9.1, 9.2., 9.3, 9.4, 9.5, 9.6, H1, H2

The course project in this course serves the same role that homework would serve in a traditional calculus class. Students will propose new problems in their private wikis and post clear and understandable solutions. Whenever possible, the solution derives the result from first principles, and not a formula found in the book. Handwritten solutions shall be pdf or gif images, while the new problems shoule be in wikitext.

More details[edit]

MTH2310 Calculus II is part of Element 2 of the Wright State Core. After taking this course, students should be able to

  1. Identify the various elements of a mathematical or statistical model.
  2. Determine the values of specific components of a mathematical/statistical model or relationships among various components.
  3. Apply a mathematical/statistical model to a real-world problem.
  4. Interpret and draw conclusions from graphical, tabular, and other numerical or statistical representations of data.
  5. Summarize and justify analyses of mathematical/statistical models for problems, expressing solutions using an appropriate combination of words, symbols, tables or graphs.

Course Objectives:

To study conic sections, functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivatives and integrals of algebraic and trigonometric functions, and applications. In particular, upon completion of this course, you’ll be able to perform the following tasks.

  1. Find limits using L’Hopital’s rule.
  2. Find anti-derivatives by substitution.
  3. Find anti-derivatives by parts.
  4. Be knowledgeable to additional integration techniques, such as partial fractions, tables, and inverse trigonometric functions.
  5. Estimate integrals numerically.
  6. Compute improper integrals.
  7. Find areas, volumes and arc lengths using integrals.
  8. Calculate volumes by the disk method and/or the shell method.
  9. Evaluate the average value of a function using an integral.
  10. Solve integral applications in Physics and Engineering.
  11. Solve integral applications in Economics and Biology.
  12. Model with differential Equations.
  13. Generalize a formula of a sequence using given terms. Determine the convergence or divergence of sequences.
  14. Define series and partial sums. Determine the convergence and divergence.
  15. Determine the convergence/divergence using Integral and Comparison.
  16. Describe some common series and their convergence criteria, such p-series, telescoping series, geometric series, alternating series and etc.
  17. Describe and determine absolute convergence using the Ratio Test.
  18. Describe the power series and identify the radius and interval of convergence.
  19. Represent functions as power series and identify the convergence criteria in terms of radius and intervals.
  20. Expand functions using Maclaurin Series and Taylor Series. Identify the radius and interval of convergence.
  21. Give examples of applications of Taylor Polynomials, such as computing trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions. Give an error estimate and decide the number of terms needed to reach the required accuracy.
  22. Describe the 3D space using the rectangular coordinate system.
  23. Describe vectors, directions and magnitudes. Perform the addition and scalar multiplication of vectors. Provide the geometric interpretation.
  24. Describe the standard basis for the #D space and represent vectors in terms of the standard basis.
  25. Describe and compute the dot product. Explain and give at least one application.
  26. Describe and compute the cross product. Explain and provide one application.
  27. Find equations of lines in the 3D space.
  28. Find the equations of planes in the 3D space.
  29. Describe functions and surfaces in the 3D space.
  30. Convert among rectangular, cylindrical and spherical coordinates.

PHY1050[edit]

Extended content

PHY1050: How things work The physics associated with everyday scientific and technological phenomena and devices, including those associated with the generation, detection, and application of sound, light, and energy (4 credit hours.) There is also a 1 credit required lab that meets on Tuesdays and Thursdays. This is a General Education course with no prerequisites.

There is no textbook. But we will borrow from the following online (and free) resources:

  1. https://www.physicsclassroom.com/ (good high school introduction to classical physics)
  2. https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/How_things_work_college_course (A Wikiversity predecessor to the current course)
  3. http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~orban/physics_coding/hourofcode/ (Youtube video series on using computers to simulate classical motion)
  4. https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Quizbank/HTW (will be the source for five exams)
  5. https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Wright_State_University_Lake_Campus/2018-9/Phy1050 (A tentative schedule for these exams)

The labs and quizzes will follow the general pattern defined by the five midterm tests (T1-T5). Since we have a small class size, we will be more focused on improving the tests than memorizing the answers. Each of these units has a theme:

  1. The first test (T1) covers what is known as classical physics, which is associated with the work of Galileo and Newton during the 17th century. This mathematical view of the world formed the foundations for our understanding of fluids (i.e. weather forecasts, and much of our understanding of chemistry, sound, and light.
  2. The next unit covers the Modern Physics revolution associated with the 20th century. This includes the quantum theory of the atom and Einstein's relativity. We will spend a great deal of time exploring Bell' theorem, which was discovered in 1964 and has been called "the most profound discovery of science" (not everybody agrees.)
  3. The third unit discusses computers, with an emphasis on the history of computers in science dates back to ancient times.
  4. The fourth unit looks at the Industrial Revolution.
  5. Finally we look at the Global Warming controversy. Much of the fourth and fifth units are devoted to reviewing and deepening our understanding of the basic concepts developed in the first three units: Classical Physics, Quantum Physics, and Computer technology.

As we look for ways to improve this course, perhaps to the point where it can evolve into an online course, we shall see how computer technology can be used to automate portions of higher education, as discussed on the Wikiversity page Quizbank. Many of the labs will be devoted to this series of videos that mixes computer technology with classical mechanics:

http://www.physics.ohio-state.edu/~orban/physics_coding/hourofcode/

PHY1060[edit]

Astronomy: Phy1060 is an introductory Astronomy course that emphasizes the solar system and the universe of stars and galaxies. Topics include the earth-moon system, other planets and their satellites, space exploration, theories for the origin of the solar system stellar evolution, astrophysics, and cosmology.

The one-credit lab Phy1060L is a corequisite that focuses on Astronomical observations, experiments, as well as developing new materials based on the based on the OER textbook by OpenStax.

This textbook is available online, as a downloadable pdf file. And it can be purchased for at a modest cost:

This semester will focus on developing the concepts introduced in Quizbank documents found at:

A tentative schedule can be found in the class Notes

Grades:

  • 70% of the grade is based exams. Four midterms will be tentatively scheduled, and a final exam will count twice as much as a midterm. Either your worst midterm exam grade is dropped, or the weight of the final will be reduced to that of a midterm exam (depending on which gives you the highest net exam score.)
  • 20% is based on labs and quizzes. No lab, quiz or test can performed at a later date if you are absent. But, three of your worst performances on labs and quizzes will be automatically dropped.
  • 10% is based on a term paper, which will be submitted electronically to Pilot on or before Friday 19 April 2019.

Getting help

Writing: Because writing is such an important part of a college education, the Student Success Center provides free writing support to all Wright State students, at any stage of your writing process and for any class. I encourage you to visit the SSC for help with any aspect of your writing, from research to revision. Sessions are available M-Th by appointment or walk-in from 10-5 pm and Fridays by appointment only from 10-5. To make an appointment, stop by the SSC (182 Andrews Hall) or call 419-586-0333. For more information about the SSC, their hours, and scheduling, please visit: https://lake.wright.edu/campus-life/student-success-center.

Math: The Student Success Center offers free assistance to students enrolled in mathematics courses within the Wright State Catalog. I encourage you to visit the SSC for help with any aspect of math above DEV. Sessions are available M-Th by appointment or walk-in from 10-5 pm and Fridays by appointment only from 10-5 pm. To make an appointment, stop by the SSC (182 Andrew Hall) or call 419-586-0333. For more information about the SSC, their hours, and scheduling, please visit: https://lake.wright.edu/campus-life/student-success-center.

LTC: The Library & Technology Center provides free access to scholarly resources in all formats to all Wright State students. WSU students can also visit the LTC for assistance with creating or editing multimedia projects i.e. PowerPoint, Voiceovers, Website development, etc., free of charge. The LTC is temporarily located in 182 Andrews Hall. For additional information about the LTC and the services they provide please call (419) 586-0333, or visit the LTC M-Fri from 9am-5pm

Office of Disability Services: If a student has a disability that will require special accommodations, it is essential that he or she discuss it with the instructor and/or The Office of Disability Services (ODS) before or during the first week of the semester. ODS will work with these students on an individual basis to determine what services, equipment, and accommodations would be appropriate regarding their documented needs. Students who may qualify for these types of services should initiate contact with the instructor and/ or ODS as soon as possible to enable the university to meet their needs.  Please call Deanna Springer at 419-586-0366, email deanna.springer@wright.edu or visit ODS (Rm 182 Andrews) for more information.

PHY1110[edit]

Extended content

PHY1110: Fundamental physics of mechanics, is a 4 credit General Education course with a required 1 credit hour lab. Topics include laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, circular and rotational motion, gravity, fluids, mechanical waves and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites: Undergraduate level MTH 1280 Minimum Grade of D or WSU Math Placement Level 40. Corequisites: PHY1110L; PHY1110R.

Textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/college-physics

See also:

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Wright_State_University_Lake_Campus/2018-9/Phy1110
https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Quizbank/College_Physics_Sem_1
https://pilot.wright.edu/d2l/loginh/?target=%2fd2l%2fhome

Study guides for five schedules exams (4 Tests and Final Exam) may be found at:

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Quizbank/College_Physics_Sem_1

This course covers what is known as "classical" physics. Physics is largely a matter of using mathematics to predict the outcome of systems simple enough to permit mathematical modeling. Classical physics is not an exact description of the universe, but it is an excellent approximation under the following conditions: Matter must be moving at speeds less than about 1% of the speed of light, the objects dealt with must be large enough to be seen with a microscope, and only weak gravitational fields, such as the field generated by the Earth, can be involved. Because humans live under such circumstances, classical physics seems intuitively reasonable, while many aspects of modern physics seem bizarre. [1] A portion of this series' second semester (PHY1120) is devoted to modern physics.

PHY1120[edit]

Principles of Physics 2: Phy1120 covers the fundamentals of charge, electric field, magnetism, optics and modern physics. Topics include electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic waves, geometric and wave optics, optical instruments, relativity, quantum theory, and nuclear physics (4 credit hours.) Also required is the lab PHY2210L: Introductory-level laboratory problems (1 credit hour.)

The textbook is provided by OpenStax and is available online, as a downloadable pdf file. And it can be purchased for at a modest cost:

The exams are based on material which can be found at:

This semester will focus on developing the concepts introduced in Quizbank documents found at:

A tentative schedule can be found in the class Notes

Grades:

  • 70% of the grade is based exams. Four midterms will be tentatively scheduled, and a final exam will count twice as much as a midterm. Either your worst midterm exam grade is dropped, or the weight of the final will be reduced to that of a midterm exam (depending on which gives you the highest net exam score.)
  • 20% is based on labs and quizzes. No lab, quiz or test can performed at a later date if you are absent. But, three of your worst performances on labs and quizzes will be automatically dropped.
  • 10% is based on a term paper, which will be submitted electronically to Pilot on or before Friday 19 April 2019.

Getting help

Writing: Because writing is such an important part of a college education, the Student Success Center provides free writing support to all Wright State students, at any stage of your writing process and for any class. I encourage you to visit the SSC for help with any aspect of your writing, from research to revision. Sessions are available M-Th by appointment or walk-in from 10-5 pm and Fridays by appointment only from 10-5. To make an appointment, stop by the SSC (182 Andrews Hall) or call 419-586-0333. For more information about the SSC, their hours, and scheduling, please visit: https://lake.wright.edu/campus-life/student-success-center.

Math: The Student Success Center offers free assistance to students enrolled in mathematics courses within the Wright State Catalog. I encourage you to visit the SSC for help with any aspect of math above DEV. Sessions are available M-Th by appointment or walk-in from 10-5 pm and Fridays by appointment only from 10-5 pm. To make an appointment, stop by the SSC (182 Andrew Hall) or call 419-586-0333. For more information about the SSC, their hours, and scheduling, please visit: https://lake.wright.edu/campus-life/student-success-center.

LTC: The Library & Technology Center provides free access to scholarly resources in all formats to all Wright State students. WSU students can also visit the LTC for assistance with creating or editing multimedia projects i.e. PowerPoint, Voiceovers, Website development, etc., free of charge. The LTC is temporarily located in 182 Andrews Hall. For additional information about the LTC and the services they provide please call (419) 586-0333, or visit the LTC M-Fri from 9am-5pm

Office of Disability Services: If a student has a disability that will require special accommodations, it is essential that he or she discuss it with the instructor and/or The Office of Disability Services (ODS) before or during the first week of the semester. ODS will work with these students on an individual basis to determine what services, equipment, and accommodations would be appropriate regarding their documented needs. Students who may qualify for these types of services should initiate contact with the instructor and/ or ODS as soon as possible to enable the university to meet their needs.  Please call Deanna Springer at 419-586-0366, email deanna.springer@wright.edu or visit ODS (Rm 182 Andrews) for more information.

PHY2400[edit]

General Physics 1: PHY2400 is an introductory survey of mechanics for science and engineering students. Uses of interpreting physical phenomena. Topics include vectors, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotation, oscillation and thermodynamics (4 credit hours.) Also required is the lab PHY2410L: Introductory physics laboratory problems in mechanics, oscillation and thermodynamics (1 credit hour.)

The textbook is open source and can be read online or downloaded as a pdf at zero cost. A paperback copy of each version is available at a modest cost:

  1. https://openstax.org/details/books/university-physics-volume-1
  2. https://openstax.org/details/books/university-physics-volume-2
  3. https://openstax.org/details/books/university-physics-volume-3 (will not be covered in the first semester course)

A tentative schedule can be found in the class Notes

A good way to study for the exams is:

  1. file:Study-calc1Bnk.pdf (first-day handout)
  2. file:All-calc1Bnk.pdf (contains multiple versions of numerical questions)


Other useful resources:

Solutions to most quiz questions can be found at



Grades:

  • 70% of the grade is based exams. Four midterms will be tentatively scheduled, and a final exam will count twice as much as a midterm. Either your worst midterm exam grade is dropped, or the weight of the final will be reduced to that of a midterm exam (depending on which gives you the highest net exam score.)
  • 20% is based on labs and quizzes. No lab, quiz or test can performed at a later date if you are absent. But, three of your worst performances on labs and quizzes will be automatically dropped.
  • 10% is based on a term paper, which will be submitted electronically to Pilot on or before Friday 19 April 2019.

Getting help

Writing: Because writing is such an important part of a college education, the Student Success Center provides free writing support to all Wright State students, at any stage of your writing process and for any class. I encourage you to visit the SSC for help with any aspect of your writing, from research to revision. Sessions are available M-Th by appointment or walk-in from 10-5 pm and Fridays by appointment only from 10-5. To make an appointment, stop by the SSC (182 Andrews Hall) or call 419-586-0333. For more information about the SSC, their hours, and scheduling, please visit: https://lake.wright.edu/campus-life/student-success-center.

Math: The Student Success Center offers free assistance to students enrolled in mathematics courses within the Wright State Catalog. I encourage you to visit the SSC for help with any aspect of math above DEV. Sessions are available M-Th by appointment or walk-in from 10-5 pm and Fridays by appointment only from 10-5 pm. To make an appointment, stop by the SSC (182 Andrew Hall) or call 419-586-0333. For more information about the SSC, their hours, and scheduling, please visit: https://lake.wright.edu/campus-life/student-success-center.

LTC: The Library & Technology Center provides free access to scholarly resources in all formats to all Wright State students. WSU students can also visit the LTC for assistance with creating or editing multimedia projects i.e. PowerPoint, Voiceovers, Website development, etc., free of charge. The LTC is temporarily located in 182 Andrews Hall. For additional information about the LTC and the services they provide please call (419) 586-0333, or visit the LTC M-Fri from 9am-5pm

Office of Disability Services: If a student has a disability that will require special accommodations, it is essential that he or she discuss it with the instructor and/or The Office of Disability Services (ODS) before or during the first week of the semester. ODS will work with these students on an individual basis to determine what services, equipment, and accommodations would be appropriate regarding their documented needs. Students who may qualify for these types of services should initiate contact with the instructor and/ or ODS as soon as possible to enable the university to meet their needs.  Please call Deanna Springer at 419-586-0366, email deanna.springer@wright.edu or visit ODS (Rm 182 Andrews) for more information.

PHY2410[edit]

Extended content

PHY2410: Introductory survey of electricity and magnetism. Uses calculus in interpreting physical phenomena. Topics include electric field and potential, currents, DC circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, and optics.

General Physics II is a General Education 4 credit hour course with a required 1 credit hour lab. Prerequisites: Undergraduate level PHY 2400 Minimum Grade of D and Undergraduate level MTH 2300 Minimum Grade of D and Undergraduate level MTH 2310 Minimum Grade of D (MTH 2310 can be taken concurrently). Corequisites: PHY2410L (mandatory attendance); PHY2410R. Each student is enrolled in either the Tuesday or Thursday section. Depending on how these sections are filled, it may or may not be possible to permit students to switch sections.

Textbooks

https://openstax.org/details/books/university-physics-volume-2
https://openstax.org/details/books/university-physics-volume-3

See also

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Wright_State_University_Lake_Campus/2018-9/Phy2410
https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Quizbank/University_Physics_Semester_2
https://pilot.wright.edu/d2l/loginh/?target=%2fd2l%2fhome

The following sections in OpenStax University Physics are covered in this course: Unit 2: Electricity and Magnetism

From VOLUME II
Chapter 5: Electric Charges and Fields
Chapter 6: Gauss’s Law
Chapter 7: Electric Potential
Chapter 8: Capacitance
Chapter 9: Current and Resistance
Chapter 10: Direct-Current Circuits
Chapter 11: Magnetic Forces and Fields
Chapter 12: Sources of Magnetic Fields
Chapter 13: Electromagnetic Induction
Chapter 14: Inductance
Chapter 15: Alternating-Current Circuits
Chapter 16: Electromagnetic Waves
From VOLUME III
Chapter 1: The Nature of Light
Chapter 2: Geometric Optics and Image Formation
Chapter 3: Interference
Chapter 4: Diffraction

Footnotes[edit]

  1. https://cnx.org/contents/Ax2o07Ul@13.1:OSViBgOw@8/Physics-An-Introduction