User:Guy vandegrift/Quizbank/Archive1/How things work/Study guide 2

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HTW T2_Study[edit]

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HTW T2_Study-v1s1[edit]

1. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and NOT somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

___ a) at a specific frequency
___ b) above a threshold frequency
___ c) above a threshold intensity
___ d) above a threshold wavelength


2. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and the electron was somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

___ a) above a threshold intensity
___ b) above a thresholdfrequency
___ c) above a threshold wavelength
___ d) at a specific frequency


3. In the photoelectric effect, how was the maximum kinetic energy measured?

___ a) by measuring the wavelength of the light
___ b) by measuring the distance between the electrodes
___ c) by measuring the voltage required to prevent the electrons from passing between the two electrodes.


4. The Industrial Revolution began shortly before

___ a) World War I (1914)
___ b) the American revolution (1776)
___ c) the American civil war (1861)


5. Cartwright built two textile factories. One of them

___ a) is still in use today
___ b) two of these are true
___ c) burned down
___ d) was transported to Germany
___ e) was sabotaged by workers


6. The purpose of Eli Whitney's cotton gin was to

___ a) clean cotton
___ b) remove seeds
___ c) pick cotton
___ d) spin cotton
___ e) weave cotton


7. Manchester acquired the nickname __________ during the early 19th century owing to its sprawl of ______

___ a) Cokopolis, coke processing plants
___ b) Coalopolis, coal mines
___ c) Cottonopolis, textile factories
___ d) Weavopolis, Weaving factories


8. A major change in the metal industries during the era of the Industrial Revolution was the replacement of wood and other bio-fuels with coal. Compared to wood, coal required

___ a) less labour to mine, but was less abundant (until the Rineland coal fields were discovered).
___ b) about the same labour to mine, but was more abundant than wood.
___ c) less labour to mine and was also more abundant.


9. Henry Cort developed rolling, which is 15 times _____ than ______

___ a) faster, puddling
___ b) cheaper, puddling
___ c) faster, hammering
___ d) cheaper, hammering


10. Puddling involved

___ a) stirring with a long rod and was never successfully mechanised.
___ b) the use of coke instead of coal and led to much strong iron
___ c) the use of coke instead of coal greatly reduced the cost of producing pig iron
___ d) stirring with a long rod and became much cheaper when steam engines replaced manual stirring


11. For most of the period of the Industrial Revolution, the majority of industrial power was supplied by

___ a) water and wind.
___ b) water and steam.
___ c) steam and wind.


12. The Miner's Friend

___ a) was electrical lighting
___ b) transported miners
___ c) pumped water
___ d) provided ventilation


13. According to Wikipedia, the first large machine tool was used to

___ a) plane rails for railroads
___ b) drill coal mines
___ c) bore cylinders for steam engines steam engines.
___ d) shape plates for ship hulls


14. During the Industrial Revolution, the cost of producing sulfuric acid greatly improved by

___ a) replacing iron containers with glass containers
___ b) replacing glass containers with iron containers
___ c) replacing lead containers with glass containers
___ d) replacing glass containers with lead containers


15. The Industrial Revolution lasted just under _____ years

___ a) 500
___ b) 100
___ c) 200
___ d) 300
___ e) 400


16. Early uses for sulphuric acid included

___ a) removing rust and bleaching cloth
___ b) making cement and bleaching cloth
___ c) producing dyes and bleaching cloth
___ d) producing dyes and making cement
___ e) removing rust and making cement


17. During the Industrial Revolution, the best Chemists were trained in

___ a) United States
___ b) Great Britain
___ c) Italy
___ d) Germany
___ e) Sweden


18. The dominant industry of the Industrial Revolution in terms of employment, output and invested capital was

___ a) ship building
___ b) railroads
___ c) military spending
___ d) farm equipment
___ e) textiles


19. What impact did the industrial revolution have on living standards of ordinary people, according to Wikipedia?

___ a) little or no growth in the first half, but enormous growth in the second half of the industrial revolution.
___ b) the question is a subject of controversy
___ c) sustained growth, for the first time in history
___ d) little or no growth until much later (19th and 20th centuries)


20. The industrial revolution began in

___ a) Germany
___ b) Great Britain
___ c) United States
___ d) simultaneously in a variety of European nations
___ e) simultaneously in Europe and the United States


21. Which is NOT one of the three areas of development that helped initiate the industrial revolution?

___ a) iron making
___ b) steam power
___ c) assembly lines
___ d) textiles


22. The Calico Acts were initially designed to protect

___ a) large manufacturers
___ b) small manufacturers
___ c) the woollen industry
___ d) domestic cotton production


23. On the eve of the Industrial Revolution, when the textile industry was largely a cottage industry, women did the ______ and men did the _______. If a loom was used, the work done by the women required ______ person hours.

___ a) spinning, weaving, fewer
___ b) spinning, weaving, more
___ c) weaving, spinning, fewer
___ d) weaving, spinning, more


24. On the eve of the Industrial Revolution, when the textile industry was largely a cottage industry, men did the ______ and women did the _______. If a loom was used, the work done by the men required ______ person hours.

___ a) spinning, weaving, fewer
___ b) spinning, weaving, more
___ c) weaving, spinning, fewer
___ d) weaving, spinning, more


25. What fraction of the world's electricity was produced by nuclear power in 2012?

___ a) 33%
___ b) 3%
___ c) 63%
___ d) 13%


26. Chadwicks discovery of the neutron was significant because

___ a) neutrons are stable
___ b) neutrons are slow
___ c) neutrons permit induced radiation


27. Neutrons and protons both have "strong" short range interactions with the nucleus. Why can't slow protons be used to cause nuclei to undergo fission?

___ a) protons are positively charged
___ b) slow protons can induce fission but they are too expensive to produce
___ c) protons move at the speed of light
___ d) slow protons are attracted to the nucleus


28. Fermi used _______ to create what he thought was _______

___ a) "moonshine";   fast neutrons
___ b) slow neutrons;   "moonshine"
___ c) transuranic (heavy) elements;   a new source of slow neutrons
___ d) slow neutrons;   a new element heavier than uranium (called a transuranic element)


29. Fermi thought he had discovered ________, when he actually discovered ________

___ a) fusion;   hesparium
___ b) hesperium;   fission
___ c) hesperium;   fusion
___ d) fission;   hesparium


30. Which was developed first, nuclear power generation or nuclear weapons?

___ a) nuclear power generation
___ b) nuclear weapons
___ c) they were developed simultaneously


31. The Manhattan project made

___ a) uranium and enriched plutonium
___ b) plutonium and enriched hesparium
___ c) plutonium and enriched uranium


32. The Atomic Age, published in 1945, predicted ...

___ a) widespread radiation poisoning
___ b) a world government to prevent nuclear war
___ c) nuclear war
___ d) that fossil fuels would go unused


33. In 1953, "Atoms for Peace" was

___ a) a presidential speech warning of the need for nuclear arms agreements
___ b) a protest movement centered in US universities
___ c) a congressional committee
___ d) a presidential speech promoting nuclear energy production


34. The first nuclear power plant to contribute to the grid was situated in

___ a) Russia
___ b) Oak Ridge
___ c) Great Britain
___ d) Virginia


35. According to Wikipedia, the prediction made in 1954 that electricity would someday be "too cheap to meter" was

___ a) an argument that fossil fuels are so abundant that we don't need nuclear energy
___ b) an effort to promote nuclear fusion as an energy source
___ c) an effort to promote nuclear fission as an energy source


36. How does Wikipedia assess the prospects of commercial fusion power production before 2050?

___ a) expected
___ b) impossible
___ c) likely
___ d) unlikely


37. The third worst nuclear disaster occurred in Russia (1957) and was kept secret for 30 years

___ a) true
___ b) false


38. More US nuclear submarines sank due to nuclear accidents than did Russian submarines

___ a) true
___ b) false


39. The worst nuclear disaster on record occurred in Russia

___ a) true
___ b) false


40. The worldwide number of nuclear reactors and their net capacity grew steadily from 1960, and

___ a) briefly fell sharply after Three Mile Island (1979), rose again, and again fell after Chernobyl (1986)
___ b) leveled off between Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986).
___ c) fluctuated randomly but with a strong correlation with the world economy and price of oil
___ d) did not begin to level off until Chernobyl (1986)


41. In terms of lives lost per unit of energy generated, evidence suggests that nuclear power has caused ______ fatalities per unit of energy generated than the other major sources of energy.

___ a) more
___ b) less
___ c) comparable


42. According to Wikipedia, the amount of green house gasses associated with the construction and maintenance of nuclear power plants is ________ than the emissions associated with other renewable sources (wind, solar, and hydro power.)

___ a) greater
___ b) less
___ c) about the same


43. Estimates of additional nuclear generating capacity to be built by 2035 fell by ______ percent after the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011.

___ a) 10
___ b) 50
___ c) 90


44. From the figure depicting percentage of power produced by nuclear power plants, we see that the proper ranking from greatest to least reliance on nuclear power for three nations is

___ a) United States, France, with Turkey least reliant.
___ b) France ,Turkey , with the United States least reliant.
___ c) France, United States, with Turkey least reliant.
___ d) United States, Turkey, France least reliant.


45. It was discovered that radioactive elements released immense amounts of energy according to the principle of mass–energy equivalence in the ______

___ a) late 19th century
___ b) early 19th century
___ c) early 20th century


46. Chadwick's discovery of the neutron was significant because neutrons

___ a) are an excellent fuel for nuclear power
___ b) can be used to create radioactive material at a low price
___ c) are not radioactive


47. Ernest Rutherford's "moonshine" was

___ a) what he called the idea of harnessing nuclear power
___ b) what he called alpha particles
___ c) what he called the idea of relying on fossil fuels
___ d) what called neutrons


48. In a PWR reactor, the water is kept under high pressure

___ a) to reduce the heat required to boil it
___ b) to prevent it from boiling
___ c) to slow down the neutrons
___ d) only in the reactor core


49. A 2008 report from Oak Ridge National Laboratory concluded that the dose to the public from radiation from properly run nuclear plants is ___________ the radiation created by burning coal

___ a) 10 times less than
___ b) about the same as
___ c) 100 times more than
___ d) 10 times more than
___ e) 100 times less than


50. One concern is that long term nuclear waste management is now being performed by a number of private waste management companies

___ a) true
___ b) false


51. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico

___ a) is currently taking nuclear waste from production reactors
___ b) was originally a research and development facility but is now under private ownership
___ c) can no longer nuclear waste from production reactors because it is full


52. In the United States, reprocessing of spent Uranium

___ a) is not allowed due to waste management concerns
___ b) is not allowed due to nuclear weapon proliferation concerns
___ c) provides 20% of our fuel needs and allows the United States to export nuclear fuel
___ d) provides 5% of our fuel needs which is consumed within the United states


53. The reprocessing of spent Uranium worsens the problem of long term waste storage

___ a) true
___ b) false


54. The reprocessing of spent Uranium helps alleviate the problem of long term waste storage

___ a) true
___ b) false


55. Nuclear power plants typically have

___ a) high capital costs and low fuel costs
___ b) low capital costs and high fuel costs
___ c) high capital costs and high fuel costs
___ d) low capital costs and low fuel costs


56. How many latent (cancer) deaths are estimated to result from the Three Mile Island accident?

___ a) from 0 to 1000
___ b) zero
___ c) from 4000 to 25,000


57. It has been estimated that if Japan had never adopted nuclear power, the use of other fuels would have caused more lost years of life.

___ a) true
___ b) false


58. It has been estimated that farmland lost due to Fukushima accident will be again useful for farming in 40-60 years

___ a) true
___ b) false


59. Fuel rods spend typically ______ total now inside the reactor, generally until _____ of their uranium has been fissioned

___ a) 6 years;   3%
___ b) 6 months;   3%
___ c) 6 months;   30%
___ d) 6 years;   30%


60. It has been estimated that farmland lost due to Fukushima accident will not be farmed for centuries

___ a) true
___ b) false


61. The Megatons to Megawatts Program

___ a) converts weapons grade uranium into fuel for commercial reactors, and is considered a success
___ b) converts weapons grade uranium into fuel for commercial reactors, and is considered a failure
___ c) purchases spent fuel that could otherwise be used to make weapons, and is considered a success
___ d) purchases spent fuel that could otherwise be used to make weapons, and is considered a failure


62. After about __________ in a spent fuel pool the spent fuel can be moved to dry storage casks or reprocessed.

___ a) 50 years
___ b) 5 years
___ c) 5 months


63. Uranium is approximately ______________ than silver in the Earth's crust.

___ a) 4 times less common
___ b) 40 times more common
___ c) 4 times more common
___ d) 40 times less common


64. Reactors that use natural (unenriched) uranium are

___ a) considered impossible
___ b) are likely to emerge in the next few decades
___ c) are already in use


65. Fast breeder reactors use uranium-238, an isotope which constitutes _____ of naturally occurring uranium

___ a) 99%
___ b) 60%
___ c) 30%
___ d) 1 %
___ e) 3%


66. One concern about fast breeder reactors is that the uranium reserves will be exhausted more quickly

___ a) true
___ b) false


67. High-level radioactive waste management is a daunting problem because

___ a) the isotopes are short-lived
___ b) the isotopes are long-lived
___ c) they cannot be stored underground


68. A 2008 report from Oak Ridge National Laboratory concluded that the dose to the public from radiation from coal plants is ___________ the radiation nuclear plants (excluding the possibility of accidental discharges of radioactive material

___ a) 100 times less than
___ b) 100 times more than
___ c) about the same as
___ d) 10 times more than
___ e) 10 times less than


Key to HTW T2_Study-v1s1[edit]

1. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and NOT somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

- a) at a specific frequency
- b) above a threshold frequency
+ c) above a threshold intensity
- d) above a threshold wavelength


2. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and the electron was somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

- a) above a threshold intensity
- b) above a thresholdfrequency
- c) above a threshold wavelength
+ d) at a specific frequency


3. In the photoelectric effect, how was the maximum kinetic energy measured?

- a) by measuring the wavelength of the light
- b) by measuring the distance between the electrodes
+ c) by measuring the voltage required to prevent the electrons from passing between the two electrodes.


4. The Industrial Revolution began shortly before

- a) World War I (1914)
+ b) the American revolution (1776)
- c) the American civil war (1861)


5. Cartwright built two textile factories. One of them

- a) is still in use today
+ b) two of these are true
- c) burned down
- d) was transported to Germany
- e) was sabotaged by workers


6. The purpose of Eli Whitney's cotton gin was to

- a) clean cotton
+ b) remove seeds
- c) pick cotton
- d) spin cotton
- e) weave cotton


7. Manchester acquired the nickname __________ during the early 19th century owing to its sprawl of ______

- a) Cokopolis, coke processing plants
- b) Coalopolis, coal mines
+ c) Cottonopolis, textile factories
- d) Weavopolis, Weaving factories


8. A major change in the metal industries during the era of the Industrial Revolution was the replacement of wood and other bio-fuels with coal. Compared to wood, coal required

- a) less labour to mine, but was less abundant (until the Rineland coal fields were discovered).
- b) about the same labour to mine, but was more abundant than wood.
+ c) less labour to mine and was also more abundant.


9. Henry Cort developed rolling, which is 15 times _____ than ______

- a) faster, puddling
- b) cheaper, puddling
+ c) faster, hammering
- d) cheaper, hammering


10. Puddling involved

+ a) stirring with a long rod and was never successfully mechanised.
- b) the use of coke instead of coal and led to much strong iron
- c) the use of coke instead of coal greatly reduced the cost of producing pig iron
- d) stirring with a long rod and became much cheaper when steam engines replaced manual stirring


11. For most of the period of the Industrial Revolution, the majority of industrial power was supplied by

+ a) water and wind.
- b) water and steam.
- c) steam and wind.


12. The Miner's Friend

- a) was electrical lighting
- b) transported miners
+ c) pumped water
- d) provided ventilation


13. According to Wikipedia, the first large machine tool was used to

- a) plane rails for railroads
- b) drill coal mines
+ c) bore cylinders for steam engines steam engines.
- d) shape plates for ship hulls


14. During the Industrial Revolution, the cost of producing sulfuric acid greatly improved by

- a) replacing iron containers with glass containers
- b) replacing glass containers with iron containers
- c) replacing lead containers with glass containers
+ d) replacing glass containers with lead containers


15. The Industrial Revolution lasted just under _____ years

- a) 500
+ b) 100
- c) 200
- d) 300
- e) 400


16. Early uses for sulphuric acid included

+ a) removing rust and bleaching cloth
- b) making cement and bleaching cloth
- c) producing dyes and bleaching cloth
- d) producing dyes and making cement
- e) removing rust and making cement


17. During the Industrial Revolution, the best Chemists were trained in

- a) United States
- b) Great Britain
- c) Italy
+ d) Germany
- e) Sweden


18. The dominant industry of the Industrial Revolution in terms of employment, output and invested capital was

- a) ship building
- b) railroads
- c) military spending
- d) farm equipment
+ e) textiles


19. What impact did the industrial revolution have on living standards of ordinary people, according to Wikipedia?

- a) little or no growth in the first half, but enormous growth in the second half of the industrial revolution.
+ b) the question is a subject of controversy
- c) sustained growth, for the first time in history
- d) little or no growth until much later (19th and 20th centuries)


20. The industrial revolution began in

- a) Germany
+ b) Great Britain
- c) United States
- d) simultaneously in a variety of European nations
- e) simultaneously in Europe and the United States


21. Which is NOT one of the three areas of development that helped initiate the industrial revolution?

- a) iron making
- b) steam power
+ c) assembly lines
- d) textiles


22. The Calico Acts were initially designed to protect

- a) large manufacturers
- b) small manufacturers
+ c) the woollen industry
- d) domestic cotton production


23. On the eve of the Industrial Revolution, when the textile industry was largely a cottage industry, women did the ______ and men did the _______. If a loom was used, the work done by the women required ______ person hours.

- a) spinning, weaving, fewer
+ b) spinning, weaving, more
- c) weaving, spinning, fewer
- d) weaving, spinning, more


24. On the eve of the Industrial Revolution, when the textile industry was largely a cottage industry, men did the ______ and women did the _______. If a loom was used, the work done by the men required ______ person hours.

- a) spinning, weaving, fewer
- b) spinning, weaving, more
+ c) weaving, spinning, fewer
- d) weaving, spinning, more


25. What fraction of the world's electricity was produced by nuclear power in 2012?

- a) 33%
- b) 3%
- c) 63%
+ d) 13%


26. Chadwicks discovery of the neutron was significant because

- a) neutrons are stable
- b) neutrons are slow
+ c) neutrons permit induced radiation


27. Neutrons and protons both have "strong" short range interactions with the nucleus. Why can't slow protons be used to cause nuclei to undergo fission?

+ a) protons are positively charged
- b) slow protons can induce fission but they are too expensive to produce
- c) protons move at the speed of light
- d) slow protons are attracted to the nucleus


28. Fermi used _______ to create what he thought was _______

- a) "moonshine";   fast neutrons
- b) slow neutrons;   "moonshine"
- c) transuranic (heavy) elements;   a new source of slow neutrons
+ d) slow neutrons;   a new element heavier than uranium (called a transuranic element)


29. Fermi thought he had discovered ________, when he actually discovered ________

- a) fusion;   hesparium
+ b) hesperium;   fission
- c) hesperium;   fusion
- d) fission;   hesparium


30. Which was developed first, nuclear power generation or nuclear weapons?

- a) nuclear power generation
+ b) nuclear weapons
- c) they were developed simultaneously


31. The Manhattan project made

- a) uranium and enriched plutonium
- b) plutonium and enriched hesparium
+ c) plutonium and enriched uranium


32. The Atomic Age, published in 1945, predicted ...

- a) widespread radiation poisoning
- b) a world government to prevent nuclear war
- c) nuclear war
+ d) that fossil fuels would go unused


33. In 1953, "Atoms for Peace" was

- a) a presidential speech warning of the need for nuclear arms agreements
- b) a protest movement centered in US universities
- c) a congressional committee
+ d) a presidential speech promoting nuclear energy production


34. The first nuclear power plant to contribute to the grid was situated in

+ a) Russia
- b) Oak Ridge
- c) Great Britain
- d) Virginia


35. According to Wikipedia, the prediction made in 1954 that electricity would someday be "too cheap to meter" was

- a) an argument that fossil fuels are so abundant that we don't need nuclear energy
+ b) an effort to promote nuclear fusion as an energy source
- c) an effort to promote nuclear fission as an energy source


36. How does Wikipedia assess the prospects of commercial fusion power production before 2050?

- a) expected
- b) impossible
- c) likely
+ d) unlikely


37. The third worst nuclear disaster occurred in Russia (1957) and was kept secret for 30 years

+ a) true
- b) false


38. More US nuclear submarines sank due to nuclear accidents than did Russian submarines

- a) true
+ b) false


39. The worst nuclear disaster on record occurred in Russia

- a) true
+ b) false


40. The worldwide number of nuclear reactors and their net capacity grew steadily from 1960, and

- a) briefly fell sharply after Three Mile Island (1979), rose again, and again fell after Chernobyl (1986)
+ b) leveled off between Three Mile Island (1979) and Chernobyl (1986).
- c) fluctuated randomly but with a strong correlation with the world economy and price of oil
- d) did not begin to level off until Chernobyl (1986)


41. In terms of lives lost per unit of energy generated, evidence suggests that nuclear power has caused ______ fatalities per unit of energy generated than the other major sources of energy.

- a) more
- b) less
+ c) comparable


42. According to Wikipedia, the amount of green house gasses associated with the construction and maintenance of nuclear power plants is ________ than the emissions associated with other renewable sources (wind, solar, and hydro power.)

- a) greater
- b) less
+ c) about the same


43. Estimates of additional nuclear generating capacity to be built by 2035 fell by ______ percent after the Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011.

- a) 10
+ b) 50
- c) 90


44. From the figure depicting percentage of power produced by nuclear power plants, we see that the proper ranking from greatest to least reliance on nuclear power for three nations is

- a) United States, France, with Turkey least reliant.
- b) France ,Turkey , with the United States least reliant.
+ c) France, United States, with Turkey least reliant.
- d) United States, Turkey, France least reliant.


45. It was discovered that radioactive elements released immense amounts of energy according to the principle of mass–energy equivalence in the ______

- a) late 19th century
- b) early 19th century
+ c) early 20th century


46. Chadwick's discovery of the neutron was significant because neutrons

- a) are an excellent fuel for nuclear power
+ b) can be used to create radioactive material at a low price
- c) are not radioactive


47. Ernest Rutherford's "moonshine" was

+ a) what he called the idea of harnessing nuclear power
- b) what he called alpha particles
- c) what he called the idea of relying on fossil fuels
- d) what called neutrons


48. In a PWR reactor, the water is kept under high pressure

- a) to reduce the heat required to boil it
+ b) to prevent it from boiling
- c) to slow down the neutrons
- d) only in the reactor core


49. A 2008 report from Oak Ridge National Laboratory concluded that the dose to the public from radiation from properly run nuclear plants is ___________ the radiation created by burning coal

- a) 10 times less than
- b) about the same as
- c) 100 times more than
- d) 10 times more than
+ e) 100 times less than


50. One concern is that long term nuclear waste management is now being performed by a number of private waste management companies

- a) true
+ b) false


51. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico

+ a) is currently taking nuclear waste from production reactors
- b) was originally a research and development facility but is now under private ownership
- c) can no longer nuclear waste from production reactors because it is full


52. In the United States, reprocessing of spent Uranium

- a) is not allowed due to waste management concerns
+ b) is not allowed due to nuclear weapon proliferation concerns
- c) provides 20% of our fuel needs and allows the United States to export nuclear fuel
- d) provides 5% of our fuel needs which is consumed within the United states


53. The reprocessing of spent Uranium worsens the problem of long term waste storage

- a) true
+ b) false


54. The reprocessing of spent Uranium helps alleviate the problem of long term waste storage

+ a) true
- b) false


55. Nuclear power plants typically have

+ a) high capital costs and low fuel costs
- b) low capital costs and high fuel costs
- c) high capital costs and high fuel costs
- d) low capital costs and low fuel costs


56. How many latent (cancer) deaths are estimated to result from the Three Mile Island accident?

- a) from 0 to 1000
+ b) zero
- c) from 4000 to 25,000


57. It has been estimated that if Japan had never adopted nuclear power, the use of other fuels would have caused more lost years of life.

+ a) true
- b) false


58. It has been estimated that farmland lost due to Fukushima accident will be again useful for farming in 40-60 years

- a) true
+ b) false


59. Fuel rods spend typically ______ total now inside the reactor, generally until _____ of their uranium has been fissioned

+ a) 6 years;   3%
- b) 6 months;   3%
- c) 6 months;   30%
- d) 6 years;   30%


60. It has been estimated that farmland lost due to Fukushima accident will not be farmed for centuries

+ a) true
- b) false


61. The Megatons to Megawatts Program

+ a) converts weapons grade uranium into fuel for commercial reactors, and is considered a success
- b) converts weapons grade uranium into fuel for commercial reactors, and is considered a failure
- c) purchases spent fuel that could otherwise be used to make weapons, and is considered a success
- d) purchases spent fuel that could otherwise be used to make weapons, and is considered a failure


62. After about __________ in a spent fuel pool the spent fuel can be moved to dry storage casks or reprocessed.

- a) 50 years
+ b) 5 years
- c) 5 months


63. Uranium is approximately ______________ than silver in the Earth's crust.

- a) 4 times less common
+ b) 40 times more common
- c) 4 times more common
- d) 40 times less common


64. Reactors that use natural (unenriched) uranium are

- a) considered impossible
- b) are likely to emerge in the next few decades
+ c) are already in use


65. Fast breeder reactors use uranium-238, an isotope which constitutes _____ of naturally occurring uranium

+ a) 99%
- b) 60%
- c) 30%
- d) 1 %
- e) 3%


66. One concern about fast breeder reactors is that the uranium reserves will be exhausted more quickly

- a) true
+ b) false


67. High-level radioactive waste management is a daunting problem because

- a) the isotopes are short-lived
+ b) the isotopes are long-lived
- c) they cannot be stored underground


68. A 2008 report from Oak Ridge National Laboratory concluded that the dose to the public from radiation from coal plants is ___________ the radiation nuclear plants (excluding the possibility of accidental discharges of radioactive material

- a) 100 times less than
+ b) 100 times more than
- c) about the same as
- d) 10 times more than
- e) 10 times less than


Attribution (for quiz questions) under CC-by-SA license
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Quantum_mechanics/Photoelectric_effect/Quiz&oldid=1395828
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=How_things_work_college_course/Industrial_Revolution_quiz&oldid=1230172
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/How_things_work_college_course/Nuclear_power_quizzes
Study guide
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Quantum_mechanics/Photoelectric_effect&oldid=1231
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Industrial_Revolution&oldid=618322687
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Nuclear_power&oldid=619329035