User:Guy vandegrift/Quizbank/Archive1/College Physics/II T4study

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TrigPhysT4_151021_Study[edit]

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TrigPhysT4_151021_Study-v1s1[edit]

1. Which lens has the shorter focal length?

___ a) Ray drawing eye schematic01.svg
___ b) Ray drawing eye schematic.svg
___ c) They have the same focal lengh.


2. Ray drawing eye schematic01.svg If this represents the eye looking at an object, where is this object?

___ a) at infinity
___ b) One focal length in front of the eye
___ c) Two (of the other answers) are true
___ d) very far away
___ e) directly in front of the eye (almost touching)


3. After passing through a the lens of a camera or the eye, the focal point is defined as where the rays meet.

___ a) true
___ b) false


4. Ray drawing eye schematic01.svg Mr. Smith is gazing at something as shown in the figure to the left. Suppose he does not refocus, but attempts to stare at the star shown in the figures below. Which diagram depicts how the rays from the star would travel if he does not refocus?

___ a) Ray drawing eye Wrong Answer.svg
___ b) Ray drawing eye schematic02.svg
___ c) Ray drawing eye schematic alternate.svg


5.
Lens1b.svg
Shown is a corrective lens by a person who needs glasses. This ray diagram illustrates
___ a) how a nearsighted person might see a distant object
___ b) how a farsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort
___ c) how a farsighted person might see a distant object
___ d) how a nearsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort


6.
Lens1 leftRight reversed.svg
Shown is a corrective lens by a person who needs glasses. This ray diagram illustrates
___ a) how a farsighted person might see a distant object
___ b) how a nearsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort
___ c) how a nearsighted person might see a distant object
___ d) how a farsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort


7. In optics, normal means

___ a) perpendicular to the surface
___ b) to the right of the optical axis
___ c) parallel to the surface
___ d) to the left of the optical axis


8. The law of reflection applies to

___ a) telescopes but not microscopes
___ b) only light in a vacuum
___ c) curved surfaces
___ d) flat surfaces
___ e) both flat and curved surfaces


9. When light passes from air to glass

___ a) it bends away from the normal
___ b) the frequency decreases
___ c) it does not bend
___ d) the frequency increases
___ e) it bends towards the normal


10. When light passes from glass to air

___ a) it bends towards the normal
___ b) the frequency decreases
___ c) it does not bend
___ d) the frequency increases
___ e) it bends away from the normal


11. An important principle that allows fiber optics to work is

___ a) total internal reflection
___ b) partial internal absorption
___ c) the invariance of the speed of light
___ d) total external refraction
___ e) the Doppler shift


12. The focal point is where

___ a) rays meet whenever they pass through a lens
___ b) rays meet whenever they are forming an image
___ c) the center of the lens
___ d) rays meet if they were parallel to the optical axis before striking a lens
___ e) rays meet if they are parallel to each other


13. An object is placed 6.3 cm to the left of a diverging lens with a focal length of 8.9 cm. How far is the image from the lens?

___a) 1.17 x 100 cm
___b) 2.07 x 100 cm
___c) 3.69 x 100 cm
___d) 6.56 x 100 cm
___e) 1.17 x 101 cm


14. An object is placed 3.55 cm to the left of a converging lens with a focal length of 6.8 cm. How far is the image from the lens?

___a) 4.18 x 100 cm
___b) 7.43 x 100 cm
___c) 1.32 x 101 cm
___d) 2.35 x 101 cm
___e) 4.18 x 101 cm


15. An object of height 0.67 cm is placed 107 cm behind a diverging lens with a focal length of 70 cm. What is the height of the image?

___a) 2.65 x 10-1 cm
___b) 3.18 x 10-1 cm
___c) 3.82 x 10-1 cm
___d) 4.58 x 10-1 cm
___e) 5.49 x 10-1 cm


16. An object is placed 12.1 cm to the left of a diverging lens with a focal length of 16.9 cm. On the side, at a distance of 6.7 cm from the diverging lens is a converging lens with focal length equal to 4 cm. How far is the final image from the converging lens?

___a) 5.64 x 100 cm
___b) 1.78 x 101 cm
___c) 5.64 x 101 cm
___d) 1.78 x 102 cm
___e) 5.64 x 102 cm


17. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and NOT somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

___ a) at a specific frequency
___ b) above a threshold intensity
___ c) above a threshold wavelength
___ d) above a threshold frequency


18. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and the electron was somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

___ a) at a specific frequency
___ b) above a threshold intensity
___ c) above a thresholdfrequency
___ d) above a threshold wavelength


19. In the photoelectric effect, how was the maximum kinetic energy measured?

___ a) by measuring the voltage required to prevent the electrons from passing between the two electrodes.
___ b) by measuring the wavelength of the light
___ c) by measuring the distance between the electrodes


20. Excepting cases where where quantum jumps in energy are induced in another object (i.e., using only the uncertainty principle), which would NOT put a classical particle into the quantum regime?

___ a) low speed
___ b) low mass
___ c) high speed
___ d) confinement to a small space


21. How does the Bohr atom differ from Newton's theory of planetary orbits?

___ a) The force between proton and electron is not attractive for the atom, but it is for planets and the sun.
___ b) electrons make elliptical orbits while planets make circular orbits
___ c) planets make elliptical orbits while the electron makes circular orbits
___ d) The force between planets and the sun is not attractive for the atom, but it is for proton and electron.


22. What are the units of Plank's constant?

___ a) energy x time
___ b) mass x velocity x distance
___ c) none of the above
___ d) momentum x distance
___ e) all of the above


23. What are the units of Plank's constant?

___ a) all of the above
___ b) momentum x distance x mass
___ c) none of the above
___ d) mass x velocity
___ e) energy x time


24. How would you describe Old Quantum Theory

___ a) complete but not self-consistent
___ b) neither complete nor self-consistent
___ c) complete and self-consistent
___ d) self-consistent but not complete


25. The first paper that introduced quantum mechanics was the study of

___ a) protons
___ b) energy
___ c) light
___ d) electrons


26. What are examples of energy?

___ a)
___ b) all of the above
___ c) heat
___ d) mgh where m is mass, g is gravity, and h is height


27. What are examples of energy?

___ a) all of the above
___ b)
___ c) heat
___ d) momentum


28. What was Plank's understanding of the significance of his work on blackbody radiation?

___ a) he knew it would someday win him a Nobel prize
___ b) he eventually convinced his dissertation committee that the theory was correct
___ c) the thought it was some sort of mathematical trick
___ d) he was afraid to publish it for fear of losing his reputation


29. What was "spooky" about Taylor's 1909 experiment with wave interference?

___ a) The light was so dim that the photoelectric effect couldn't occur
___ b) The light was so dim that only one photon at a time was near the slits.
___ c) The light was dim, but it didn't matter because he was blind.
___ d) The interference pattern mysteriously disappeared.


30. Approximately how often does a supernovae occur in a typical galaxy?

___ a) once every 50 years
___ b) once every 5 years
___ c) once a 5 months


31. If a star were rushing towards Earth at a high speed

___ a) there would be a blue shift in the spectral lines
___ b) there would be a red shift in the spectral lines
___ c) there would be no shift in the spectral lines


32. An example of a standard candle is

___ a) a supernova in a distant galaxy
___ b) all of these are standard candles
___ c) any part of the nighttime sky that is dark
___ d) any part of the nighttime sky that is giving off light


33. If a galaxy that is 10 Mpc away is receding at 700km/s, how far would a galaxy be receding if it were 20 Mpc away?

___ a) 350km/s
___ b) 1400km/s
___ c) 700km/s


34. The "apparent" magnitude of a star is

___ a) How bright it would be if it were not receding due to Hubble expansion
___ b) How bright it would be if you were exactly one light year away
___ c) How bright it is as viewed from Earth


35. In the essay "Why the sky is dark at night", a graph of velocity versus distance is shown. What is odd about those galaxies in the Virgo cluster (circled in the graph)?

___ a) they are not receding away from us
___ b) they have a wide variety of speeds
___ c) the cluster is close to us
___ d) they all have nearly the same speed


36. Why was it important to observe supernovae in galaxies that are close to us?

___ a) they have less of a red-shift, and interstellar gas absorbs red light
___ b) because supernovea are impossible to see in distant galaxies
___ c) we have other ways of knowing the distances to the nearby galaxies; this gives us the opportunity to study supernovae of known distance and ascertain their absolute magnitude.
___ d) it is easier to measure the doppler shift, and that is not always easy to measure.


37. What if clouds of dust blocked the light from distant stars? Could that allow for an infinite and static universe?

___ a) No, there are clouds, but they remain too cold to resolve the paradox
___ b) No, the clouds would get hot
___ c) No, if there were clouds, we wouldn't see the distant galaxies
___ d) Yes, that is an actively pursued hypothesis


Key to TrigPhysT4_151021_Study-v1s1[edit]

1. Which lens has the shorter focal length?

- a) Ray drawing eye schematic01.svg
+ b) Ray drawing eye schematic.svg
- c) They have the same focal lengh.


2. Ray drawing eye schematic01.svg If this represents the eye looking at an object, where is this object?

- a) at infinity
- b) One focal length in front of the eye
+ c) Two (of the other answers) are true
- d) very far away
- e) directly in front of the eye (almost touching)


3. After passing through a the lens of a camera or the eye, the focal point is defined as where the rays meet.

- a) true
+ b) false


4. Ray drawing eye schematic01.svg Mr. Smith is gazing at something as shown in the figure to the left. Suppose he does not refocus, but attempts to stare at the star shown in the figures below. Which diagram depicts how the rays from the star would travel if he does not refocus?

- a) Ray drawing eye Wrong Answer.svg
+ b) Ray drawing eye schematic02.svg
- c) Ray drawing eye schematic alternate.svg


5.
Lens1b.svg
Shown is a corrective lens by a person who needs glasses. This ray diagram illustrates
+ a) how a nearsighted person might see a distant object
- b) how a farsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort
- c) how a farsighted person might see a distant object
- d) how a nearsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort


6.
Lens1 leftRight reversed.svg
Shown is a corrective lens by a person who needs glasses. This ray diagram illustrates
- a) how a farsighted person might see a distant object
- b) how a nearsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort
- c) how a nearsighted person might see a distant object
+ d) how a farsighted person might see an object that is too close for comfort


7. In optics, normal means

+ a) perpendicular to the surface
- b) to the right of the optical axis
- c) parallel to the surface
- d) to the left of the optical axis


8. The law of reflection applies to

- a) telescopes but not microscopes
- b) only light in a vacuum
- c) curved surfaces
- d) flat surfaces
+ e) both flat and curved surfaces


9. When light passes from air to glass

- a) it bends away from the normal
- b) the frequency decreases
- c) it does not bend
- d) the frequency increases
+ e) it bends towards the normal


10. When light passes from glass to air

- a) it bends towards the normal
- b) the frequency decreases
- c) it does not bend
- d) the frequency increases
+ e) it bends away from the normal


11. An important principle that allows fiber optics to work is

+ a) total internal reflection
- b) partial internal absorption
- c) the invariance of the speed of light
- d) total external refraction
- e) the Doppler shift


12. The focal point is where

- a) rays meet whenever they pass through a lens
- b) rays meet whenever they are forming an image
- c) the center of the lens
+ d) rays meet if they were parallel to the optical axis before striking a lens
- e) rays meet if they are parallel to each other


13. An object is placed 6.3 cm to the left of a diverging lens with a focal length of 8.9 cm. How far is the image from the lens?

-a) 1.17 x 100 cm
-b) 2.07 x 100 cm
+c) 3.69 x 100 cm
-d) 6.56 x 100 cm
-e) 1.17 x 101 cm


14. An object is placed 3.55 cm to the left of a converging lens with a focal length of 6.8 cm. How far is the image from the lens?

-a) 4.18 x 100 cm
+b) 7.43 x 100 cm
-c) 1.32 x 101 cm
-d) 2.35 x 101 cm
-e) 4.18 x 101 cm


15. An object of height 0.67 cm is placed 107 cm behind a diverging lens with a focal length of 70 cm. What is the height of the image?

+a) 2.65 x 10-1 cm
-b) 3.18 x 10-1 cm
-c) 3.82 x 10-1 cm
-d) 4.58 x 10-1 cm
-e) 5.49 x 10-1 cm


16. An object is placed 12.1 cm to the left of a diverging lens with a focal length of 16.9 cm. On the side, at a distance of 6.7 cm from the diverging lens is a converging lens with focal length equal to 4 cm. How far is the final image from the converging lens?

+a) 5.64 x 100 cm
-b) 1.78 x 101 cm
-c) 5.64 x 101 cm
-d) 1.78 x 102 cm
-e) 5.64 x 102 cm


17. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and NOT somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

- a) at a specific frequency
+ b) above a threshold intensity
- c) above a threshold wavelength
- d) above a threshold frequency


18. If the electron behaved as a classical (non-quantum) particle and the electron was somehow connected to a spring inside the metal, then one would expect that photoelectrons would be emitted _______

+ a) at a specific frequency
- b) above a threshold intensity
- c) above a thresholdfrequency
- d) above a threshold wavelength


19. In the photoelectric effect, how was the maximum kinetic energy measured?

+ a) by measuring the voltage required to prevent the electrons from passing between the two electrodes.
- b) by measuring the wavelength of the light
- c) by measuring the distance between the electrodes


20. Excepting cases where where quantum jumps in energy are induced in another object (i.e., using only the uncertainty principle), which would NOT put a classical particle into the quantum regime?

- a) low speed
- b) low mass
+ c) high speed
- d) confinement to a small space


21. How does the Bohr atom differ from Newton's theory of planetary orbits?

- a) The force between proton and electron is not attractive for the atom, but it is for planets and the sun.
- b) electrons make elliptical orbits while planets make circular orbits
+ c) planets make elliptical orbits while the electron makes circular orbits
- d) The force between planets and the sun is not attractive for the atom, but it is for proton and electron.


22. What are the units of Plank's constant?

- a) energy x time
- b) mass x velocity x distance
- c) none of the above
- d) momentum x distance
+ e) all of the above


23. What are the units of Plank's constant?

+ a) all of the above
- b) momentum x distance x mass
- c) none of the above
- d) mass x velocity
- e) energy x time


24. How would you describe Old Quantum Theory

- a) complete but not self-consistent
+ b) neither complete nor self-consistent
- c) complete and self-consistent
- d) self-consistent but not complete


25. The first paper that introduced quantum mechanics was the study of

- a) protons
- b) energy
+ c) light
- d) electrons


26. What are examples of energy?

- a)
+ b) all of the above
- c) heat
- d) mgh where m is mass, g is gravity, and h is height


27. What are examples of energy?

+ a) all of the above
- b)
- c) heat
- d) momentum


28. What was Plank's understanding of the significance of his work on blackbody radiation?

- a) he knew it would someday win him a Nobel prize
- b) he eventually convinced his dissertation committee that the theory was correct
+ c) the thought it was some sort of mathematical trick
- d) he was afraid to publish it for fear of losing his reputation


29. What was "spooky" about Taylor's 1909 experiment with wave interference?

- a) The light was so dim that the photoelectric effect couldn't occur
+ b) The light was so dim that only one photon at a time was near the slits.
- c) The light was dim, but it didn't matter because he was blind.
- d) The interference pattern mysteriously disappeared.


30. Approximately how often does a supernovae occur in a typical galaxy?

+ a) once every 50 years
- b) once every 5 years
- c) once a 5 months


31. If a star were rushing towards Earth at a high speed

+ a) there would be a blue shift in the spectral lines
- b) there would be a red shift in the spectral lines
- c) there would be no shift in the spectral lines


32. An example of a standard candle is

+ a) a supernova in a distant galaxy
- b) all of these are standard candles
- c) any part of the nighttime sky that is dark
- d) any part of the nighttime sky that is giving off light


33. If a galaxy that is 10 Mpc away is receding at 700km/s, how far would a galaxy be receding if it were 20 Mpc away?

- a) 350km/s
+ b) 1400km/s
- c) 700km/s


34. The "apparent" magnitude of a star is

- a) How bright it would be if it were not receding due to Hubble expansion
- b) How bright it would be if you were exactly one light year away
+ c) How bright it is as viewed from Earth


35. In the essay "Why the sky is dark at night", a graph of velocity versus distance is shown. What is odd about those galaxies in the Virgo cluster (circled in the graph)?

- a) they are not receding away from us
+ b) they have a wide variety of speeds
- c) the cluster is close to us
- d) they all have nearly the same speed


36. Why was it important to observe supernovae in galaxies that are close to us?

- a) they have less of a red-shift, and interstellar gas absorbs red light
- b) because supernovea are impossible to see in distant galaxies
+ c) we have other ways of knowing the distances to the nearby galaxies; this gives us the opportunity to study supernovae of known distance and ascertain their absolute magnitude.
- d) it is easier to measure the doppler shift, and that is not always easy to measure.


37. What if clouds of dust blocked the light from distant stars? Could that allow for an infinite and static universe?

- a) No, there are clouds, but they remain too cold to resolve the paradox
+ b) No, the clouds would get hot
- c) No, if there were clouds, we wouldn't see the distant galaxies
- d) Yes, that is an actively pursued hypothesis


Attribution (for quiz questions) under CC-by-SA license
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Physics_equations/25-Geometric_Optics/Q:vision&oldid=1378615
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Physics_equations/25-Geometric_Optics/Q:thinLens&oldid=1378617
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Quantum_mechanics/Photoelectric_effect/Quiz&oldid=1395828
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=How_things_work_college_course/Quantum_mechanics_timeline/Quiz&oldid=1396075
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Why_is_the_Sky_Dark_at_Night/quiz&oldid=1396006
Study guide
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Physics_equations/Sheet/All_chapters
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Light_and_optics
http://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Physics_equations/Sheet/All_chapters
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Quantum_mechanics/Photoelectric_effect&oldid=1231
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=How_things_work_college_course/Quantum_mechanics_timeline&oldid=1383060
http://en.wikiversity.org/w/index.php?title=Why_is_the_Sky_Dark_at_Night&oldid=1248646