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  • Gamma-ray astronomy is radiation astronomy applied to the various extraterrestrial gamma-ray sources, especially at night. It is usually conducted above
    120 KB (13,629 words) - 03:08, 1 February 2016
  • being measured." A gamma-ray burst has occurred somewhere nearby to Earth. The burst at maximum intensity lasted 100 s. While gamma-rays are absorbed by
    23 KB (2,136 words) - 04:00, 30 January 2016
  • of gamma-ray burst. 11. True or False, In 2005, ESO telescopes detected, for the first time, the visible light following a short-duration burst and
    11 KB (738 words) - 03:08, 1 February 2016
  • error circle are stars (*), additional X-ray sources (X), a gamma-ray burst source (gammaBurst), and a dark nebula (DkNeb). The image at the top right
    23 KB (2,974 words) - 04:17, 30 January 2016
  • considered to happen before." "The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) ... detects sudden flares of gamma-rays produced by gamma ray bursts and solar flares. Its scintillators
    97 KB (11,410 words) - 03:14, 1 February 2016
  • The first gamma-ray source in Scutum is unknown. The field of gamma-ray astronomy is the result of observations and theories about gamma-ray sources detected
    24 KB (3,308 words) - 02:28, 1 February 2016
  • first gamma-ray source in Triangulum Australe is unknown. The field of gamma-ray astronomy is the result of observations and theories about gamma-ray sources
    23 KB (3,234 words) - 02:28, 1 February 2016
  • and cosmic gamma-ray burst experiment (GRB) had 3 main objectives: study and monitor solar flares, detect and localize cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and in-situ
    42 KB (4,935 words) - 00:14, 1 February 2016
  • considered to happen before." "The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) ... detects sudden flares of gamma-rays produced by gamma ray bursts and solar flares. Its scintillators
    143 KB (16,580 words) - 03:03, 1 February 2016
  • its infancy." "In 2009, [the] Fermi Gamma Ray Telescope in Earth orbit observed [an] intense burst of gamma rays corresponding to positron annihilations
    31 KB (3,294 words) - 03:17, 1 February 2016
  • being measured." A gamma-ray burst has occurred somewhere nearby to Earth. The burst at maximum intensity lasted 100 s. While gamma-rays are absorbed by
    144 KB (16,074 words) - 00:15, 1 February 2016
  • overlap with either "Gamma rays" or "UV"? Look through the SIMBAD list again to see if either "gamma", "gam", "gB" for gamma-ray burst, or UV, EUV, or XUV
    28 KB (3,484 words) - 02:30, 1 February 2016
  • the time." ... In 2009, [the] Fermi Gamma Ray Telescope in Earth orbit observed [an] intense burst of gamma rays corresponding to positron annihilations
    17 KB (1,706 words) - 04:15, 3 February 2016
  • False, The distribution of gamma-ray bursts is tetratropic. 75. Which of the following are cold dark matter gamma rays? 76. Complete the text:
    43 KB (1,914 words) - 03:05, 1 February 2016
  • sources within this error circle are stars, other X-ray sources, a gamma-ray burst source, and a dark nebula. In the theory of source astronomy comes
    108 KB (12,256 words) - 00:17, 1 February 2016
  • combination of H-alpha and infrared is also used and is green in color. A gamma-ray burst (GRB) may have an afterglow at longer wavelengths. Specifically, GRB
    99 KB (12,044 words) - 04:26, 3 February 2016
  • neutrino losses [may have an] impact on the red giant branch (RGB)". A gamma-ray burst (GRB) may have an afterglow at longer wavelengths. Specifically, GRB
    125 KB (14,083 words) - 03:16, 1 February 2016
  • 2014-01-10.  Bill Keel (October 2003). "Jets, Superluminal Motion, and Gamma-Ray Bursts". Tucson, Arizona USA: University of Arizona. Retrieved 2014-03-19
    27 KB (2,799 words) - 04:51, 30 January 2016
  • Earth (section Gamma rays)
    the time." ... In 2009, [the] Fermi Gamma Ray Telescope in Earth orbit observed [an] intense burst of gamma rays corresponding to positron annihilations
    60 KB (6,528 words) - 02:01, 7 February 2016
  • radiation at radio frequencies, i.e. above ∼ 100MHz." "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays associated with extremely energetic explosions that
    76 KB (8,119 words) - 03:11, 1 February 2016

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